Browsers aim to thwart tracking

New protections in Apple’s Safari and Mozilla’s Firefox browsers aim to prevent companies from turning “cookie” data files used to store sign-in details and preferences into broader trackers that take note of what you read, watch and research on other sites.

Source: Apple, Firefox browsers aim to thwart Facebook, Google tracking

Data Protection in the Event of a “No Deal Brexit”

As part of its preparations for a “no deal” scenario when the Article 50 negotiating period comes to an end on 29 March 2019, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (“DDCMS”) has released guidance on “Data protection if there’s no Brexit deal”.

The UK will become a “third country” on its exit from the European Union, which means that unhindered cross-border transfers of data will no longer automatically be able to take place between the UK and the EU.

Source: Data Protection in the Event of a “No Deal Brexit”

Building consumer trust and overcoming privacy barriers with on-device AI

New data and privacy legislation is helping to protect and give consumers what they want: less irrelevant marketing junk. However, with less access to online behaviours and little understanding of offline personas, it is becoming more difficult for brands to understand their consumer needs.  In order for brands to be able to communicate relevant and personalised content, a middle ground needs to be met.

Full article: Building consumer trust and overcoming privacy barriers with on-device AI

Child abuse algorithms: from science fiction to cost-cutting reality

In an age of austerity, and a climate of fear about child abuse, perhaps it is unsurprising that social workers have turned to new technology for help.

Local authorities are beginning to ask whether big data could help to identify vulnerable children. Could a computer program flag a problem family, identify a potential victim and prevent another Baby P or Victoria Climbié?

Source: Child abuse algorithms: from science fiction to cost-cutting reality | Society | The Guardian

Here’s how GDPR is already changing web design

When Europe’s sweeping privacy regulations (called GDPR) took effect in May, it was unclear just how much the new rules would affect this completely ubiquitous fact of life on the internet, but a report from the Reuters Institute gives us an early look: Among news sites–which tend to use the most cookies, since they’re dependent on ad dollars–cookies are down by 22%.

Source: Third-party cookies have dropped by 22% since GDPR took effect

The growing role of second party data in marketing

May we see second party data have a growing role in marketing today if secure platforms are to enable such marketplaces to emerge? In an age where data is THE hot commodity, the trading of first party data between publishers, brands and like-minded organisations is a welcome and natural opportunity.

Read article: The growing role of second party data in marketing

GDPR Italian Implementing Decree Has Been Published

On 4 September, the Legislative Decree no. 101 of 10 August 2018 (the “Decree”) for the national implementation of General Data Protection Regulation (EU) 2016/679 (the “GDPR”) has been published in the Official Journal . The approach of the legislator was to maintain the structure of former Legislative Decree 196/2003 (the “Privacy Code”) which, however, has been extensively amended and integrated, and now contains only some residual provisions in addition to those of the GDPR which are directly applicable.

Source: GDPR Italian Implementing Decree Has Been Published

Apple will replace TouchID with FaceID

The new iPhones announced on Wednesday, the iPhone XS, the XS Max, and the XR, only use FaceID, TouchID’s heir apparent. FaceID was introduced in 2017 in a perhaps less flawless fashion.

“Unlocking it is as easy as looking at it and swiping up,” Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering Craig Federighi said as the then-brand-new $999 iPhone X failed to unlock. “And you know—let’s try that again.”

Source: Apple Killed TouchID Live In Front of Thousands of Eyewitnesses – Motherboard

E-signatures can prove conclusion of data processing agreements

The use of electronic signatures (e-signatures) can prove that data processing contracts have been concluded and their terms agreed to, the EU’s justice commissioner has said. Věra Jourová said that it is possible for data processing contracts to be entered into digitally, but that it is not necessary for those agreements to be signed electronically for them to have effect.

Source: E-signatures can prove conclusion of data processing agreements

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