Schools are using AI to track their students

Any US school that receives federal funding is required to have an internet-safety policy. As school-issued tablets and Chromebook laptops become more commonplace, schools must install technological guardrails to keep their students safe.

While some simply block inappropriate websites, others turn to Safety Management Platforms (SMPs) that use natural-language processing to scan through the millions of words typed on school computers. If a word or phrase might indicate bullying or self-harm behavior, it gets surfaced for a team of humans to review. But even in an age of student suicides and school shootings, when do security precautions start to infringe on students’ freedoms?

Source: Schools are using AI to track their students — Quartz

U.S. government seeks Facebook help to wiretap Messenger

The U.S. government is trying to force Facebook to break the encryption in its popular Messenger app so law enforcement may listen to a suspect’s voice conversations in a criminal probe, three people briefed on the case said, resurrecting the issue of whether companies can be compelled to alter their products to enable surveillance.

Source: Exclusive: U.S. government seeks Facebook help to wiretap Messenger – sources | Reuters

Report: 90% of Visitors to EU domains grant GDPR Consent

A recent report published by consent management platform Quantcast Choice has revealed that, for European Union (EU) domains an average consent rate over 90 percent is being experienced. Around 81 percent of all users said yes to everything. The remaining 8 percent said yes to some things.

Source: Quantcast Report: 90% of Visitors to EU domains grant GDPR Consent – Compliance Junction

We underestimate the threat of facial recognition technology at our peril

Data could be used to draw conclusions about who you are, what you believe, what you have done – and what you might do in the future. The lack of safeguards combined with the centralisation of a massive amount of information raises the potential for abuse and ever-expanding mission creep.

Read article: We underestimate the threat of facial recognition technology at our peril | Cynthia Wong | Opinion | The Guardian

Google escapes Irish data privacy investigation over tracking scandal

Ireland’s data protection commissioner is not currently investigating Google’s data-tracking controversy as the tech giant has not yet officially incorporated its data protection reside. While Google indicated that Ireland was to be its ‘one stop shop’ data protection jurisdiction in the wake of the EU’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) law, it has not yet finalised this registration process with the Irish DPC’s office.

Source: Google escapes Irish data privacy investigation over tracking scandal – Independent.ie

California Privacy Protection Act will impact Ad Tech

On June 28, the California Legislature hastily passed the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA). The law, which takes effect in less than 1 ½ years, Jan. 1, 2020, ushers in a GDPR-light approach here in the United States. No more buffer. No more distant regulators unable or unwilling to reach US companies on their home turf. If they haven’t already done so, the time for ad tech companies to change the way they store and process data is fast approaching.

Read article: Should Ad Tech Panic Over The California Privacy Protection Act Now Or Later? | AdExchanger

Hackers Turned an Amazon Echo Into a Spy Bug

Researchers found they could turn the smart speakers into surveillance devices—if they could get their own attack tool on the same Wi-Fi. However, Echo owners shouldn’t panic: the hackers already alerted Amazon to their findings, and the company pushed out security fixes in July.

Source: Hackers Turned an Amazon Echo Into a Spy Bug | WIRED

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