Hackers infect 500,000 consumer routers all over the world with malware

Hackers have infected more than 500,000 home and small-office routers around the world with malware that can be used to collect communications, launch attacks on others, and permanently destroy the devices with a single command.

Source: Hackers infect 500,000 consumer routers all over the world with malware | Ars Technica

UK Data Protection Act  enters into force tomorrow

The UK Data Protection Bill received Royal Assent on 23 May and its main provisions will commence on 25 May 2018. The UK Act is not limited to GDPR provisions but also covers national security issues and transposes the EU Law Enforcement Directive.

With regard to GDPR derogations, the age for a child’s consent in relation to information society services will be 13 instead of 16 in the GDPR. Whilst the GDPR does not require organisations to notify to the supervisory authority, the UK Act imposes a notification fee to be paid to the ICO.

Source: UK Data Protection Act receives Royal Assent and enters into force tomorrow – Privacy Laws & Business

Irish Data Protection Bill in Final Committee Stage Before the Irish Legislature

On May 16, 2018, the Irish Data Protection Bill 2018 entered the final committee stage in Dáil Éireann (the lower house and principal chamber of the Irish legislature). The Bill was passed by the Seanad (the upper house of the legislature) at the end of March 2018.

Source: Irish Data Protection Bill in Final Committee Stage Before the Irish Legislature

GDPR is upon us: are you ready for what comes next?

The wait is finally over—this Friday the European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will come into force. For many readers of this post, a huge amount of work will have been done in recent months in building up to compliance with the new regime.

Source: GDPR is upon us: are you ready for what comes next?

Spanish court admits emails from internal investigation as evidence

A judicial decision, issued by the employment division of the Spanish Supreme Court, has confirmed the admissibility as evidence, to justify a dismissal, of the emails of the dismissed employee obtained in the course of an internal investigation.

This decision has its origin in a claim for unfair dismissal filed by an employee of a Spanish company which had been dismissed by the company for committing very serious infringements of the Spanish Workers’ Statute – it was proven that the dismissed employee had accepted a bribe from one of the company’s suppliers.

Source: Spanish court admits emails from internal investigation as evidence

Amazon Is Under Fire for Selling Controversial Facial Recognition Tech to Police

The American Civil Liberties Union and other privacy activists are asking Amazon to stop marketing a powerful facial recognition tool to police, saying law enforcement agencies could use the technology to “easily build a system to automate the identification and tracking of anyone.”

Source: ACLU to Amazon: Don’t Market Face Recognition Tech to Police | Time

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