The Facebook Privacy Setting That Doesn’t Do Anything at All

For years, Facebook has left a privacy setting on its site that addresses a problem that no longer exists.

But the fact that Facebook never bothered to update that critical corner of its privacy settings, years after those changes went into effect, is downright baffling—and speaks to a general a lack of seriousness in the company’s attitude toward data transparency.

Source: The Facebook Privacy Setting That Doesn’t Do Anything at All | WIRED

Cloud data privacy for businesses unclear after Supreme Court drops Microsoft case

The case led to the CLOUD Act, which requires tech companies comply with court orders for data stored in the US and overseas.

After the passage of the CLOUD Act, the federal government attained a new warrant, which replaced the original warrant served on Microsoft in 2013. The court concluded Tuesday that there is no longer a “live dispute” between the US and Microsoft based on the legal changes, and directed the district court to dismiss the case.

Source: Cloud data privacy for businesses unclear after Supreme Court drops Microsoft case – TechRepublic

Facebook starts to roll out GDPR notifications and consent requests

The company may have an uphill battle ahead to get users to share personal data.

Facebook previously announced that it would apply General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) privacy protections and rules globally to all its users. This was a major decision — partly practical, partly principled and partly public relations. Yesterday, the company began to explain how it will start implementation of the new guidelines.

Source: Facebook starts to roll out GDPR notifications and consent requests – MarTech Today

A Short History of Mark Zuckerberg’s Privacy Gaffes at Facebook

Facebook has been updating its privacy settings for more than a decade. Will this time be different?

Maybe these tools will put users in control of our personal information once and for all, and as a result, we will trust Facebook to protect our data better in the future. But if history is any guide, we’ll see this episode again, judging by this not-at-all exhaustive list of the times Zuckerberg has apologized for giving you privacy jitters, and assured you it would all be absolutely fine, eventually.

Source: A Short History of Mark Zuckerberg’s Privacy Gaffes at Facebook | WIRED

Privacy as an Afterthought: ICANN’s Response to the GDPR

Almost three years ago, the global domain name authority ICANN chartered a working group to consider how to build a replacement for the WHOIS database, a publicly-accessible record of registered domain names.

Because it includes the personal information of millions of domain name registrants with no built-in protections for their privacy, the legacy WHOIS system exposes registrants to the risk that their information will be misused by spammers, identity thieves, doxxers, and censors.

Source: Privacy as an Afterthought: ICANN’s Response to the GDPR

Initial Observations on the European Commission’s E-Evidence Proposals

On April 17, the European Commission (EC) published its long-awaited draft legislation on E-Evidence (“E-Evidence”) to facilitate cross-border demands for internet users’ communications content and metadata.

Commissioners Jourova (Justice), Avramopoulos (Home Affairs), and King (Security) proposed two separate pieces of legislation: (i) a Regulation (“Regulation”) that enables law enforcement authorities in European Union (EU) Member States to issue production orders on communications and cloud providers based in other Member States or based outside of the European Union, regardless of where the data is located; and (ii) a Directive (“Directive”) that would require Member States to enact legislation compelling providers that offer services in an EU Member State to establish a legal representative in an EU Member State for the receipt of cross-border demands.

Source: Initial Observations on the European Commission’s E-Evidence Proposals

How Europe’s ‘breakthrough’ privacy law takes on Facebook and Google

Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation is forcing big changes at tech’s biggest firms – even if the US isn’t likely to follow suit.

Despite the political theatre of Mark Zuckerberg’s congressional interrogations last week, Facebook’s business model isn’t at any real risk from regulators in the US. In Europe, however, the looming General Data Protection Regulation will give people better privacy protections and force companies including Facebook to make sweeping changes to the way they collect data and consent from users – with huge fines for those who don’t comply.

Source: How Europe’s ‘breakthrough’ privacy law takes on Facebook and Google | Technology | The Guardian

Cops Around the Country Can Now Unlock iPhones, Records Show

A Motherboard investigation has found that law enforcement agencies across the country have purchased GrayKey, a relatively cheap tool for bypassing the encryption on iPhones, while the FBI pushes again for encryption backdoors.

Source: Cops Around the Country Can Now Unlock iPhones, Records Show – Motherboard

How does California’s Erasure Law stack up against the EU’s right to be forgotten

While most are familiar with the European Union’s right to be forgotten, many fewer are aware that in 2015, California enacted the Online Eraser Law, which many are touting as the “Right To Be Forgotten Lite” as it allows minors to “erase” their content online.

But, is California’s law actually RTBF Lite? Here’s how it stacks up against the European Union’s right to be forgotten.

Source: How does California’s Erasure Law stack up against the EU’s right to be forgotten

China’s facial-recognition cameras caught suspect tryiing to blend in with 60,000 concertgoers

The man’s unlikely capture became the latest example of China’s growing use of facial recognition technology.

The 31-year-old man, wanted by police, had thought playing a numbers game would be enough to allow him to fade into anonymity.

Source: A suspect tried to blend in with 60,000 concertgoers. China’s facial-recognition cameras caught him. – The Washington Post

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