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Apple Defends Delay of Privacy Feature, Slams Facebook

Apple Inc. on Thursday slammed Facebook Inc. and other internet giants for their ad-targeting practices in response to a letter questioning a decision by the iPhone maker to delay a new privacy feature.

Apple’s letter defended the company’s decision to delay an iPhone feature that requires users to give explicit permission before letting apps track them for advertising purposes. The enhancement was added as part of the company’s iOS 14 operating system in September, but a requirement that all apps use it was delayed until early 2021 after several developers, including Facebook, said the change would hurt their businesses.

Source: Apple Defends Delay of Privacy Feature, Slams Facebook – Bloomberg

LAPD Bans Use Of Commercial Facial Recognition

The Los Angeles Police Department has banned the use of commercial facial recognition systems.

The LAPD, the third-largest police department in the United States, issued a moratorium on the use of third-party facial recognition software on Nov. 13

News showed that its officers were using Clearview AI, a facial recognition platform that has taken data from Facebook and other social media platforms.

Source: LAPD Bans Use Of Commercial Facial Recognition

799 data breaches notified by Ireland’s Government departments in 2019

The Department of Social Protection was responsible for nearly half the data protection breaches notified by Government departments across the whole of last year.

However, the department, currently headed up by Fine Gael’s Heather Humphreys, declined to outline how many of these breaches were brought before the Data Protection Commission (DPC), the only government department to do so.

Source: 799 data breaches notified by Government departments in 2019

UK-Japan deal dismantles UK’s privacy protections

UK quietly commits to weakening restrictions on data transfers by accepting lower privacy standards in new trade deal.

The recent UK-Japan deal negotiated by Elizabeth Truss commits the UK to weakening restrictions on data transfers by accepting lower privacy standards. These commitments are aligned with those in other trade agreements the government wishes to sign. Yet this strategy has never been voted on, analysed or even explained to parliament.

Source: UK-Japan deal dismantles UK’s privacy protections

TikTok expands parental controls to include search, commenting and account privacy

TikTok announced it’s expanding its parental control feature set known as Family Pairing to give parents additional tools to manage various aspects of their teen’s account as well as their privacy on the social video platform.

The new tools will allow parents to set their teen’s account to private, control whether their Liked Videos are visible to others, control who can comment on the teen’s videos and even decide whether the teen is allowed to use TikTok’s search feature.

Source: TikTok expands parental controls to include search, commenting and account privacy | TechCrunch

New Report Finds That Criminals Leverage AI for Malicious Use – And It’s Not Just Deep Fakes

A jointly developed new report by Europol, the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI) and Trend Micro looking into current and predicted criminal uses of artificial intelligence (AI) was released today.

The report provides law enforcers, policymakers and other organisations with information on existing and potential attacks leveraging AI and recommendations on how to mitigate these risks.

The report concludes that cybercriminals will leverage AI both as an attack vector and an attack surface. Deep fakes are currently the best-known use of AI as an attack vector. However, the report warns that new screening technology will be needed in the future to mitigate the risk of disinformation campaigns and extortion, as well as threats that target AI data sets.

Source: New Report Finds That Criminals Leverage AI for Malicious Use – And It’s Not Just Deep Fakes

Microsoft promises to challenge all government requests for customer data

Microsoft has vowed to challenge all requests that any government or security agency makes to access its customers’ data, and will even compensate firms where it’s forced to legally grant access.

The firm will challenge every government request for public sector or enterprise customer data, from any government, where there’s a lawful basis for doing so. Where customer data is handed to authorities in violation of GDPR, Microsoft will provide financial compensation to affected customers, it has said.

Source: Microsoft promises to challenge all government requests for customer data | IT PRO

Google is adding end-to-end encryption to its Android Messages app

“We recognize that your conversations are private,” says Google.

Google is upping the security for at least some of the conversations on its Messages app by adding end-to-end encryption.

It will be rolling out end-to-end encryption on Messages, starting with one-on-one conversations between people using the Rich Communication Services-based version of the app.

Source: Google is adding end-to-end encryption to its Android Messages app | ZDNet

DHS Plans to Start Collecting Eye Scans and DNA

US Department of Homeland Security is planning to collect unprecedented levels of biometric information from immigration applicants and their sponsors — including U.S. citizens.

While some types of applicants have long been required to submit photographs and fingerprints, a rule currently under consideration would require practically everyone applying for any kind of status, or detained by immigration enforcement agents, to provide iris scans, voiceprints and palmprints, and, in some cases, DNA samples. A tangled web of defense and surveillance contractors, which operate with little public oversight, have already begun to build the infrastructure that would be needed to store these records.

Source: DHS Plans to Start Collecting Eye Scans and DNA

How regulators can get facial recognition technology right

As facial recognition technology (FRT) spreads, regulators have tools to ensure that this technology does not result in inaccurate or biased outcomes.

Policymakers can ensure that responsible protocols are in place to validate that facial recognition technology works as billed and to inform decisions about whether and how to use FRT. In building a framework for responsible testing and development, policymakers should empower regulators to use stronger auditing authority and the procurement process to prevent facial recognition applications from evolving in ways that would be harmful to the broader public.

Full article: How regulators can get facial recognition technology right

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