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Top 10 data security predictions for 2020

Data classification firm Titus has unveiled its “Top 10 Data Security Predictions for 2020″ – timely insights based on surveys and conversations with both public and private enterprises around the world as well as executive participation at major events.

Full article: #Privacy: Top ten data security predictions for 2020

Microsoft updates terms on data privacy amid EU probe

Microsoft said it was updating the privacy provisions of its commercial cloud contracts after European regulators found its deals with European Union institutions failed to protect data in line with EU law.

The EDPS, the EU’s data watchdog, opened an investigation in April to assess whether Microsoft’s contracts with the European Commission and other EU institutions met data protection rules. It raised concerns about compliance in October.

Source: Microsoft updates terms on data privacy amid EU probe – Reuters

Over 100K malicious sites using valid certificates

New research has uncovered suspicious retail look-alike domains using valid certificates.

Research conducted by Venafi, analysed suspicious domains targeting 20 major retailers in the US, UK, France, Germany and Australia. Over 100,000 lookalike domains using valid TLS certificates, to appear safe and trustworthy, were identified.

Source: #Privacy: Over 100K malicious sites using valid certificates

French Supervisory Authority publishes guidance on facial recognition

On November 15, 2019, the French Supervisory Authority (CNIL) published guidance on the use of facial recognition. The guidance is primarily directed at public authorities in France that want to experiment with facial recognition.

The guidance warns that this technology risks leading to biased results and sets out three general requirements for deploying facial recognition on an experimental basis.

First, facial recognition can only be used if there is an established need to implement an authentication mechanism that ensures a high level of reliability, and there are no other less intrusive means that would be appropriate. Second, the experimental use of facial recognition must respect the rights of individuals. Third, the use of facial recognition on an experimental basis must have a precise timeline and be based on a rigorous methodology setting out the objectives pursued and the criteria for success.

Source: French Supervisory Authority publishes guidance on facial recognition

Website privacy options aren’t much of a choice since they’re hard to find and use

Many sites offer the ability to ‘opt out’ of targeted advertisements, but doing so isn’t easy. Simplifying and standardizing opt-outs would help improve privacy on the web.

Privacy policy language is inconsistent and ambiguous. Key terms aren’t standardized across privacy policies on different sites. That makes it difficult for users to scan or search for key words or phrases that might help them understand their options.

Once someone does manage to opt-out, it’s not always clear what will happen. Even when the choices are clear, the pages are not always easy to use.

Full article: Website privacy options aren’t much of a choice since they’re hard to find and use

The NSA says it stopped tracking cellphone locations without a warrant

Last year the Supreme Court ruled, in a 5-4 decision, that a search warrant is required for law enforcement to perform cellphone tower searches to track someone’s location.

A letter sent by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) to Senator Ron Wyden affirming that ever since that Carpenter decision, the “Intelligence community” has not sought cell-site location data or GPS records without a warrant.

Source: The NSA says it stopped tracking cellphone locations without a warrant | Engadget

Amid privacy backlash, China’s DJI unveils drone-to-phone tracking

China’s DJI, the world’s largest commercial drone maker, said it is developing technology that would allow the public to track the registrations of drones in flight using just a smartphone, amid a broader industry push to make such data available.

The push for remote identification technology comes amid regulatory calls for greater oversight of drone flight, on fears that untraceable, unmanned aircraft could be used for spying or accidentally disrupt commercial flights.

Source: Amid privacy backlash, China’s DJI unveils drone-to-phone tracking – Reuters

Facebook Earns $132.80 From Your Data per Year

The newly released files indicate that between 2013 and 2015, moves that Facebook touted as protecting consumer privacy—like stopping Six4Three and other companies from accessing the names, photos, and likes of their users’ Facebook friends—were really about safeguarding the economic value of consumers’ data.

Leaked documents reveal that Facebook’s average revenue per user in the United States and Canada totaled $132.80 in the past four quarters—seven times more than the $18.70 average revenue per U.S. and Canadian user in 2013. But more importantly, Facebook executives worried that new social networks and messaging apps could get started using Facebook’s data as a jumping-off point.

 

Source: Facebook’s Six4Three Pikinis lawsuit emails explain why your data is so valuable.

Google restricts contextual ad targeting

Google has taken steps to limit data sharing for targeted adverts as it comes under increasing pressure to do more to protect the privacy of users.

The changes to its advertising technology follow an intervention from the European Union and mean that Google will no longer inform advertisers about the type of content where their ad could appear.

Source: Google restricts contextual ad targeting | The Drum

The Risks Of Law Enforcement Use Of Facial Recognition Software

Facial recognition is truly a one-of-a-kind technology — and we should treat it as such. Our faces are central to our identities, online and off, and they are difficult to hide.

the use of facial recognition technology by law enforcement is particularly problematic due to its invasiveness and increasing pervasiveness. Americans are losing due-process protections, and even law-abiding citizens cannot confidently engage in free association, free movement and free speech without fear of being tracked.

Full article: Who Stole My Face? The Risks Of Law Enforcement Use Of Facial Recognition Software | Above the Law

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