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In the battle against coronavirus, personal privacy is at risk

As countries around the world fight the spread of the coronavirus, several governments are using technology to monitor quarantines — particularly of people coming in from overseas. Israel this week approved the use of cellphone tracking technology to monitor suspected coronavirus patients — an option normally used only for counterterrorism.

But there are concerns that tracking measures to contain the pandemic could pave the way for greater government surveillance. In Israel, for example, Opposition politicians and constitutional experts criticized the tracking measures, not only for their invasion of privacy but also for the lack of parliamentary oversight in pushing them through.

Source: In the battle against coronavirus, personal privacy is at risk – CNN

Half a million private, legal and financial documents leaked online

An unsecured database has leaked over 500,000 highly sensitive documents leaving many at risk of fraud and theft.

The database appears to be linked to an iOS and Android app, MCA Wizard, which is developed by two fintech companies Argus Capital Funding and Advantage Capital Funding.

Source: #Privacy: Half a million private, legal and financial documents leaked online

Clearview AI Reportedly Worked On a Mug Shot Repository to Go With Its Face Recognition App

The controversial facial recognition firm Clearview AI has already landed in hot water for purportedly letting both law enforcement and rich investors play around in its database of billions of photos scraped from the public internet.

However, a new report suggests the company didn’t just stop there. Apparently, at one point Clearview AI aimed to compile a nationwide repository of mug shots from the last 15 years.

Source: Clearview AI Reportedly Worked On a Mug Shot Repository to Go With Its Face Recognition App

This Filter Makes Your Photos Invisible to Facial Recognition

Digital cloaking, and how you can reclaim a modicum of digital privacy.

A.I. researchers are starting to think about how technology can solve the problem it created. Algorithms with names like “PrivacyNet” and “AnonymousNet” and “Fawkes” now offer a glimmer of refuge from the facial recognition algorithms trawling the public web.

Full article: This Filter Makes Your Photos Invisible to Facial Recognition

Five billion records exposed in open ‘data breach database’

More than five billion records were exposed after a Keepnet Labs Elasticsearch “data breach database” housing a trove of security incidents from the last seven years was left unprotected.

the leak is potentially one of the biggest to date. Information exposed from Keepnet Lab’s Elasticsearch database is more than enough fodder for hackers to launch targeted phishing attacks, engage in account takeover fraud, or even make a profit by selling the data on the dark web.

Source: Five billion records exposed in open ‘data breach database’ | SC Media

Fighting AI Bias

Artificial intelligence (AI) has amazing potential to change the world, and we’ve only just begun to scratch the surface. In financial services, AI will help banks make loans more quickly and fairly, reduce the incidences of credit card fraud and help keep banking networks safe from hackers.

But innovations such as AI constantly test the bounds of what is acceptable, responsible and ethical. There’s always tension between what is next and what is right. And as we manage that tension in AI and machine learning, everyone from data scientists to boardroom executives must focus deeply on outcomes and the people who will be most affected by the decisions emerging from AI algorithms.

Full article: Forbes Insights: Fighting AI Bias—Digital Rights Are Human Rights

To Track Virus, Governments Weigh Surveillance Tools That Push Privacy Limits

As the country scrambles to control the virus, government agencies are putting in place or considering a range of tracking and surveillance technologies that test the limits of personal privacy.

The technologies include everything from geolocation tracking that can monitor the locations of people through their phones to facial-recognition systems that can analyze photos to determine who might have come into contact with individuals who later tested positive for the virus.

Source: To Track Virus, Governments Weigh Surveillance Tools That Push Privacy Limits – WSJ

Ring’s work with police lacks solid evidence of reducing crime

Amazon pushes Ring as a crime-fighting tool. Data from three of Ring’s earliest police partnerships doesn’t back up that claim.

The data shows that crime continued to fluctuate, and analysts said that while many factors affect crime rates, such as demographics, median income and weather, Ring’s technology likely wasn’t one of them.

Source: Ring’s work with police lacks solid evidence of reducing crime – CNET

USA: Senator introduces comprehensive federal data privacy bill

U.S. Senator, Jerry Moran, announced, on 12 March 2020, that he had introduced a bill for the Consumer Data Privacy and Security Act of 2020.

The Bill aims to establish a clear federal standard for data privacy protection, giving businesses a uniform standard rather than a patchwork of state laws, as it would expressly pre-empt any provision of a law, rule, regulation, or other requirement of any state or locality to the extent that such provision relates to the privacy or security of personal data.

Source: USA: Senator introduces comprehensive federal data privacy bill

Google Says It Doesn’t ‘Sell’ Your Data. Here’s How the Company Shares, Monetizes, and Exploits It.

Although big tech companies like Google keep the lights on by harvesting and monetizing your personal data, they can be quick to mince words and deny the strawman scenario of exchanging hard drives full of your data for a suitcase of money.

Google, the adtech oligarch, devourer of data, surveyor of souls, That Which Knows All That Is Known, has decided that it doesn’t sell data. So what is happening with all of that data, which Google says it’s not selling, but from which it makes tens of billions of dollars a year?

Read full article: Google Says It Doesn’t ‘Sell’ Your Data. Here’s How the Company Shares, Monetizes, and Exploits It. | Electronic Frontier Foundation

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