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Browser Fingerprinting: An Introduction and the Challenges Ahead

In the past few years, a technique called browser fingerprinting has received a lot of attention because of the risks it can pose to privacy.

What is it? How is it used? What is Tor Browser doing against it?

In this blog post is answer to these questions: Browser Fingerprinting: An Introduction and the Challenges Ahead | Tor Blog

Facebook: Charting a Way Forward on Privacy and Data Portability

To build portability tools people can trust and use effectively, online services need clear rules about what kinds of data should be portable and who is responsible for protecting that data as it moves to different services.

To address that, Facebook has published a white paper that sets forth five questions about data portability and privacy that we hope will help advance a global conversation.

The paper can be downloaded here.

Source: Charting a Way Forward on Privacy and Data Portability | Facebook Newsroom

A huge database of Facebook users’ phone numbers found online

Hundreds of millions of phone numbers linked to Facebook accounts have been found online.

The exposed server contained more than 419 million records over several databases on users across geographies, including 133 million records on U.S.-based Facebook users, 18 million records of users in the U.K., and another with more than 50 million records on users in Vietnam.

Source: A huge database of Facebook users’ phone numbers found online | TechCrunch

What the focus on the AdTech industry and cookies means for your organisation

Any organisation involved in digital advertising is accountable for the online targeting solution they use.

As a website publisher, you have to determine how your cookie banner will collect consent from your visitors, meaning that you are responsible for this technical solution.

Full article: Gemserv: What the focus on the AdTech industry and cookies means for your organisation

How long should it take to risk-score a privacy incident?

If you’ve been in the privacy world for any amount of time, you recognize there has been a marked increase in the speed at which our world operates.

New threats to our data are introduced every day. With the expanding scope of what constitutes protected and sensitive data, the number of privacy cases we must manage at any given time is increasing. Privacy professionals are being asked to do more and faster than ever.

Full article: How long should it take to risk-score a privacy incident?

US authorities impose $170m fine on YouTube for data privacy violation

YouTube has been hit with a record-breaking $170m (£139m) fine by regulators in the US for breaking children’s data privacy laws.

Authorities in New York will receive $34m of the landmark penalty. The Federal Trade Commission reached the settlement with Google, YouTube’s owner, after the video-streaming site was deemed to have collected data on children under the age of 13 without parental consents being in place, leading to youngsters receiving targeted advertising online.

Source: #privacy: USA authorities impose $170m fine on YouTube for data privacy violation

Build an Online Presence Without Giving Up Privacy

Every social network might as well be LinkedIn.

Every hiring manager will do a Google search on your name, most companies keep an eye on your social networks, and in several industries, you’re expected to have an online presence. With all this online performance, is it possible to retain some semblance of privacy?

Source: Opinion | Build an Online Presence Without Giving Up Privacy – The New York Times

Facebook will no longer scan user faces by default

It will roll out the Face Recognition privacy setting globally over the next several weeks.

Facebook is making facial recognition in photos opt-in by default. Starting today, it’s rolling out its Face Recognition privacy setting, which it first introduced in December 2017, to all users. If you have Face Recognition turned on, Facebook will notify you if someone uploads a photo of you, even if you aren’t tagged. You can then tag yourself, stay untagged, or report the photo if it’s something you want taken down.

Source: Facebook will no longer scan user faces by default – The Verge

Annual global data breach costs to exceed $5 trillion by 2024

The annual cost of worldwide data breaches will surpass $5 trillion by 2024, according to a newly published Juniper Research report.

Current yearly cost totals sit at $3 trillion, which means the jump to $5 trillion in five years represents an average annual growth of 11 percent.

Juniper’s forecast also anticipates that most breaches through 2024 will target small- and medium-sized enterprises with budgets that are insufficient to adequately defend against cyber threats.

Source: Annual global data breach costs to exceed $5 trillion by 2024: report

German court decides that GDPR consent can be tied to receiving advertising

On June 27, 2019, the High Court of Frankfurt decided that a consent for data processing tied to a consent for receiving advertising can be considered as freely given under the GDPR.

The claimant’s consent had been obtained in connection with his participation in a sweepstakes contest. The court decided that bundling consent for advertising with the participation in a sweepstakes contest does not prevent it from being “freely given”. According to the court, “freely given” consent is a consent that is given without “coercion” or “pressure”.

Source: Participation in a raffle of consent to future e-mail advertising

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