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US court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptops

A federal court in Boston has ruled that warrantless U.S. government searches of the phones and laptops of international travelers at airports and other U.S. ports of entry violate the Fourth Amendment.

Tuesday’s ruling in U.S. District Court came in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation on behalf of 11 travelers whose smartphones and laptops were searched without individualized suspicion at U.S. ports of entry.

Source: Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptops

Inherently identifiable: Is it possible to anonymize health and genetic data?

Nearly 25 million people have taken an at-home DNA testing kit and shared that data with one of four ancestry and health databases.

With this proliferation of genetic testing and biometric data collection, there should be an increased scrutiny of the practices used to deidentify this data. Biometric data, namely genetic information and health records, is innately identifiable.

But can biometric data ever truly be anonymized, what are the methods of deidentification and best practices, and the current state of biometric data under the EU General Data Protection Regulation?

Full article: Inherently identifiable: Is it possible to anonymize health and genetic data?

DNS-over-HTTPS will eventually roll out in all major browsers

All six major browser vendors have plans to support DNS-over-HTTPS (or DoH), a protocol that encrypts DNS traffic and helps improve a user’s privacy on the web.

The DoH protocol has been one of the year’s hot topics. It’s a protocol that, when deployed inside a browser, it allows the browser to hide DNS requests and responses inside regular-looking HTTPS traffic.

Source: DNS-over-HTTPS will eventually roll out in all major browsers, despite ISP opposition | ZDNet

ICO concerned by mass health data-sharing with advertisers

The UK’s data regulator has expressed deep concerns over reports that some of the most popular health websites are sharing sensitive data with advertisers across the world.

The majority of prominent health websites embed tracking cookies in users’ browsers without explicit consent to allow third-party companies to track them while surfing the internet.

This data is then transmitted to a swathe of advertising platforms including Amazon and Facebook, with the majority of data sent to Google’s DoubleClick targeted ad platform. This includes information like medical symptoms, diagnoses, drug names and fertility information.

Source: ICO concerned by mass health data-sharing with advertisers | IT PRO

Consumer Data Privacy Rights: Emerging Tech Blurs Lines

Data privacy is a fundamental right for Americans – but new emerging technologies like drone, IoT and facial recognition are introducing gray areas.

Lawmakers for their part are taking steps to enforce regulatory efforts for data privacy – but still have a long way to go.

Full article: Consumer Data Privacy Rights: Emerging Tech Blurs Lines | Threatpost

As Apple stakes out an aggressive pro-privacy stance, Google occupies middle ground

The ad industry has been bracing for more privacy-focused upheaval in the coming months, from lawmakers and data regulators or from privacy-zealous browsers. As Google has put forward alternative plans for a privacy-focused and ad-funded web, it has also been asking the industry for feedback. This is a markedly different approach to Apple’s muscular stance of ultimate user privacy by default.

Google, as a predominantly ad-funded business with a lot more skin in the game, is revealing itself to be much more collaborative with the industry as it’s forming its approach. , Google has been exploring what restricted third-party cookie use in Chrome would look like by releasing industry research on how it would impact publisher revenue, laying out proposals for building a more private web, and using machine learning to manage ad frequency.

Full article: As Apple stakes out an aggressive pro-privacy stance, Google occupies middle ground – Digiday

EU could introduce political ad rules for Facebook and Twitter

Vera Jourova, EU commissioner for justice, consumers and gender equality, said in a CNBC interview lawmakers in Brussels will introduce rules for more transparency in political campaigning. Companies including Facebook and Twitter will have to obey them.

Legislation around political ads would bolster the EU’s efforts to take a leading role regulating the world’s biggest technology companies on issues ranging from disinformation to competition and data privacy.

Source: EU could introduce political ad rules for Facebook and Twitter

Most organisations still misunderstand cloud security

A report based on a survey of over 700 respondents from the United States, Canada and UK, foundthat 60% of respondents misunderstand the shared responsibility model for cloud security and incorrectly believe the cloud provider is responsible for securing privileged access.

Furthermore, 68% of organisations are not employing a common security model or enforcing least privilege access to reduce risk, and the majority list security as their main challenge with cloud migrations.

Source: #Privacy: Most organisations still misunderstand cloud security, report reveals

Data Protection Commissioner investigating micro-targeting on social media

The Data Protection Commissioner Helen Dixon has said her office is conducting a number of investigations into the micro-targeting of individuals on large social media platforms as it raised issues of compliance with new General Data Protection Regulation rules.

Current investigations are open into the use of platforms, data brokers, and ad exchanges. Micro-targeting individuals with specific content has the potential of amplifying the harmful effects of disinformation. Commissioner hopes to conclude all investigations by next year.

Source: Data Protection Commissioner investigating micro-targeting on social media

Data and privacy could be competition concerns

The Justice Department’s top antitrust official warned tech giants on Friday that amassing vast quantities of consumers’ data could create competition concerns in the eyes of federal regulators, marking the U.S. government’s latest shot across the bow at Silicon Valley and its size.

Makan Delrahim, the chief of the department’s antitrust division, said people’s private information had become the lucrative “oil” for the digital age — and its misuse could threaten to harm consumers and corporate competitors.

While Delrahim did not mention any specific company by name, the comments could have vast implications at a moment when the agency is investigating tech giants including Google.

Source: DOJ issues new warning to big tech: Data and privacy could be competition concerns – The Washington Post

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