fbpx

Pirate Bay Founder Launches Anonymous Domain Registration Service

Pirate Bay founder Peter Sunde has launched domain registration service Njalla, which offers site owners full anonymity. Njalla acts as middleman adding extra layer of protection – customers don’t buy the domain names themselves, they let the Njalla do it for them.

Source: Pirate Bay Founder Launches Anonymous Domain Registration Service

Data protection boss vows she will use new powers to fine firms up to €20m

In the interview Irish Data Protection Commissioner Helen Dixon reveals intention to use powers given by new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) to issue fines of up to €20 million or 4% of a company’s annual turnover.

Source: Data protection boss vows she will use new powers to fine firms up to €20m

British Cops Will Scan Every Fan’s Face at the Champions League Final

South Wales Police is piloting facial recognition at one of Europe’s biggest sporting events despite significant criticism against the technology from fans.

Cameras will potentially be scanning the faces of an estimated 170,000 visitors. Cameras also will capture plus many more thousands of people in the Cardiff city center on UEFA Champions League match day.

Captured images will then be compared in real time to 500,000 custody images stored in the police information and records management system alerting police to any “persons of interest”.

Source: British Cops Will Scan Every Fan’s Face at the Champions League Final

Singapore, Japan, Korea among least prepared for new EU data laws

More than half of firms in Singapore, Japan, and South Korea express concerns they will not be able to meet the May 25, 2018, deadline for GDPR compliance, while a quarter of their peers in Australia and US fear shutting down as a result.

Source: Singapore, Japan, Korea among least prepared for new EU data laws

New European Union Financial Rules to Give U.S. Consumers Protection as Well

Thanks to new set of regulations in the European Union, customers of U.S. financial institutions – banks, credit-card companies and insurance companies – soon will enjoy better protection of their personal data.

The General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will force companies to be more transparent about the type of data they collect on individuals, how that data is used and when personal information is exposed in a breach.

GDPR takes effect in May 2018 and will apply to all companies that process data on EU citizens, even if they are located outside EU. It is also expected that large multinational companies, including financial institutions, operating in multiple jurisdictions will adopt single set of rules throughout their operations, rather than try to enforce multiple sets of rules across locations.

Source: New European Union Financial Rules to Give U.S. Consumers Protection as Well

Preparing to Comply with the GDPR: Start Now, Plan to Invest

In May of 2018, Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) will take effect throughout the European Union. GDPR will set data protection standards for the EU and brings with it significant consequences for companies in EU or those who has business there. To understand the risk exposure, companies are currently in the process of assessing their compliance with the upcoming regulation in light of the potential maximum exposure.

Source: Preparing to Comply with the GDPR: Start Now, Plan to Invest

Article 29 Working Party Issues Guidance on Data Protection Impact Assessments

Article 29 Working Party has published draft guidance on data protection impact assessments (DPIA). Its full text of is available on the Working Party’s website. Comments to draft guidance can be submitted by 23 May 2017.

Source: Article 29 Working Party Issues Guidance on Data Protection Impact Assessments

Privacy watchdog: businesses that demand personal data in return for services run foul of new EU data protection laws

In his opinion on ePrivacy Regulation, European Data Protection Supervisor Giovanni Buttarelli indicated that businesses that require consumers to provide data about themselves in return for access to their services they offer will not have valid consent to process that information under GDPR.

Source: Privacy watchdog: businesses that demand personal data in return for services run foul of new EU data protection laws

State of the Cyber Nation: UK Government Report on Cybersecurity Breaches

On 19 April 2017, the UK Government’s Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) published a report on cybersecurity breaches and how they affected UK companies in the last year.

According to the report in the past year 51% of all UK businesses that hold personal data on customers identified at least one cybersecurity breach.

The report also indicates that a many of UK companies have not implemented comprehensive cybersecurity policies or strong safeguards to protect against cyber attacks.

Source: State of the Cyber Nation: UK Government Report on Cybersecurity Breaches

Court to Facebook: Stop harvesting users’ WhatsApp personal data without consent

Facebook has lost its bid to collect the personal data of WhatsApp users in Germany — for now.

In August last year, Facebook-owned WhatsApp changed its terms and privacy policy to say that the parent company would gain access to users’ telephone numbers and other pieces of data, such as the mobile operating system being used, the user’s phone number, and screen resolution.

The idea was to improve Facebook’s ad targeting and to make it easier for the social network to suggest friend connections.

Source: Court to Facebook: Stop harvesting users’ WhatsApp personal data without consent

>