EU Publishes Measures to Strengthen EU Cybersecurity Structures and Capabilities

On September 13, 2017, the European Commission and the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy published a Joint Communication to the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union on “Resilience, Deterrence and Defence: Building strong cybersecurity for the EU” (“Joint Communication”).

Source: EU Publishes Measures to Strengthen EU Cybersecurity Structures and Capabilities

CIPL Issues Comments on the Proposal for an EU ePrivacy Regulation

The Centre for Information Policy Leadership (“CIPL”) issued a white paper on the Proposal for an ePrivacy Regulation. The White Paper comments on the European Commission’s proposal to replace and modernize the privacy framework for electronic communications contained in the current ePrivacy Directive and to align it with the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”).

Source: CIPL Issues Comments on the Proposal for an ePrivacy Regulation in the European Union : : Privacy & Information Security Law Blog

Monitoring employees’ communications: the final word

An employee had used his employer’s Yahoo! messenger service (intended for work use) for personal communications, including with his fiancé and brother. His employer monitored those communications and sacked him for misuse of its messenger service. Did that monitoring of his private communications breach his privacy rights under Article 8 ECHR? No, said the Romanian courts, and Strasbourg’s Fourth Chamber said likewise. But on a further appeal to the Grand Chamber of the ECHR, that assessment has been reversed: the last word is that Article 8 was indeed breached here.

Source: Monitoring employees’ communications: the final word – Panopticon Panopticon

Three Types of Data in the GDPR

The paper aims to determine how the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) could be read in harmony with Article 29 Working Party’s Opinion on anonymisation.

Source: Bridging Policy, Regulation, and Practice? A Techno-Legal Analysis of Three Types of Data in the GDPR by Runshan Hu, Sophie Stalla-Bourdillon, Mu Yang, Valeria Schiavo, Vladimiro Sassone :: SSRN

Why do big hacks happen? Blame Big Data!

Equifax, one of the largest credit reporting agencies, revealed on Thursday that it was hacked back in May, exposing the personal data of up to 143 million people. The data accessed by hackers contains extremely sensitive information like social security numbers, birth data, consumer’s names, driver’s license numbers and credit card numbers.

Source: Why do big hacks happen? Blame Big Data | Jathan Sadowski | Opinion | The Guardian

The Equifax Breach Exposes America’s Identity Crisis

Social Security numbers, which have been around since the 1930s, have only one intended purpose: to track US citizens’ earnings and contributions to the Social Security program. However, universality of SSN ownership has in turn led to the SSN’s adoption by private industry as a unique identifier. Unfortunately, this universality has led to abuse.

Source: The Equifax Breach Exposes America’s Identity Crisis | WIRED

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