How firms you have never interacted with can target your Facebook

Advertisers are seemingly able to access accounts with no input from the user.

On one of Facebook’s myriad setting screens, a place where few dare tread, is a list of places you’ve probably never heard of, all of whom insist that they know you. It’s emblematic of the data protection issues Facebook is struggling to address in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, of the fact that these problems spread far beyond Facebook, and of the easy solutions the company could take if only it had the courage.

Source: How firms you have never interacted with can target your Facebook | Technology | The Guardian

A flaw-by-flaw guide to Facebook’s new GDPR privacy changes

Facebook is about to start pushing European users to speed through giving consent for its new GDPR privacy law compliance changes. There are a ton of small changes, so we’ll lay out each with our criticisms.

Facebook’s consent flow starts well enough with the screen above offering a solid overview of why it’s making changes for GDPR and what you’ll be reviewing. But with just an “X” up top to back out, it’s already training users to speed through by hitting that big blue button at the bottom.

Source: A flaw-by-flaw guide to Facebook’s new GDPR privacy changes | TechCrunch

Arron Banks, the insurers and my strange data trail

Carole Cadwalladr just wanted to insure her car. Six months later, she found a mass of personal details held by a firm she had never contacted that is run by Leave.EU’s biggest donor, Arron Banks. How did it get there?

Source: Arron Banks, the insurers and my strange data trail | Technology | The Guardian

Facebook’s Blow To Third-Party Data Makes First-Party Data Even More Crucial

Facebook’s move to shut down its Partner Categories program helps it look good in the court of public opinion, shores up some loose ends with respect to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and possibly drives more profitability for the business as it removes partners that were sharing in the ad buy dollars.

Will the sunsetting of the Partner Categories program be a game-changer for companies that have long relied on a combination of first-party and third-party data to make their advertising more effective?

Source: Facebook’s Blow To Third-Party Data Makes First-Party Data Even More Crucial | AdExchanger

Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent Crime

Citizens may object to their social media mining by law enforcement, but the practice can keep the public safe.

Police departments should continue to monitor social media to inform law enforcement. After all, social media sites are full of data that can make police interventions more effective, from posts about crimes in progress to damning evidence offered freely by criminals and even live videos of crimes. However, in designing these initiatives, police departments need to pay closer attention to the Constitution as well as the needs of citizens.

Source: Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent Crime | WIRED

How One Location-Based Data Firm Is Preparing for GDPR

Mobile location firms that collect latitude and longitude stats have been particularly scrutinized because the data is considered personal under GDPR, requiring that consumers consent to providing companies with their information—which could potentially creep consumers out if they know their location is being mined for advertising.

Los Angeles location firm Factual is aiming to mitigate GDPR’s risks by scraping all of its data collected on European citizens. It will then get to work rebuilding its database by asking for consumers’ “explicit consent.” The company’s contracts now also require that partners have obtained data explicitly.

Source: How One Location-Based Data Firm Is Preparing for GDPR – Adweek

EU Commission proposes making fingerprints mandatory in ID cards

Identity cards held by EU citizens will be required to include digital images of the holder’s fingerprints as part of a crackdown on fraudulent documents used by criminals and extremists, the European Commission has proposed.

In a proposal likely to make waves in countries such as Germany, whose history has made data privacy a guarded asset, the Commission wants to do away with paper-based identity documents that are easy to falsify and can be used to enter the bloc from non-EU countries.

Source: EU Commission proposes making fingerprints mandatory in ID cards

Facebook enlists conservative help to resist privacy rules

An email seeking U.S. groups’ assistance against EU-style regulations came as Mark Zuckerberg was preparing to testify to Congress.

Facebook asked conservative groups for help last week in heading off The company’s outreach comes as the European Union is preparing to enforce strict new privacy rules that take effect in late May. Among other things, the EU’s rules allow regulators to impose fines as high as 4 percent of a company’s global revenues for serious violations.

Source: Facebook enlists conservative help to resist privacy rules – POLITICO

Denmark considers ‘data ethics council’ in wake of Facebook scandal

Minister for employment Troels Lund Poulsen has backed suggestions that an ethics council for the use of data could be established by the Danish state.

The idea has been raised by environmentalist party Alternative, which has proposed that areas such as privacy, data protection, artificial intelligence and data laws could come under the remit of the ethics council.

A similar ethics body, the Danish Council of Ethics (Det Etiske Råd), already exists for healthcare matters.

Source: Denmark considers ‘data ethics council’ in wake of Facebook scandal – The Local

Essential structures for GDPR compliance

The European Union’s new General Data Protection Regulation will go into force May 25, after six years of preparation. The main challenge for corporations will be assessing their current information collection and storage systems against the new regulations and ensuring compliance before the deadline.

Nine data protection experts from Germany, Belgium, The Netherlands, Italy, U.K., U.S., Luxembourg, Sweden and France discuss how they are helping their clients reach GDPR compliance and emphasize some of the structures businesses should put in place to avoid a crippling fine.

Source: Countdown to GDPR: Part 1 — Essential structures for GDPR compliance

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