2.6bn records have been exposed in data breaches so far this year

While the volume of data breaches has actually decreased from last year, exposed records remain stubbornly high. The report shows that 2,308 publicly announced data breaches occurred, with 2.6bn records exposed along the way.

Source: 2.6bn records have been exposed in data breaches so far this year

Google Chrome flaw puts privacy at risk

A security vulnerability in Google Chrome and all browsers that run the Blink browser engine could enable malicious actors to uncover private data in Facebook and other platforms. A potential attacker could use side channel methodology to abuse filtering functions in websites to deduce information such as age, gender, likes and location history of a Facebook user, for example, by using audio and video HTML tags to generate requests to the target site and then monitoring the progress events generated by these requests.

Source: Google Chrome flaw puts privacy at risk

Australian Law Draft Requires Companies to share Encryption Data

The Australian government has proposed a new law that would force tech companies that have encrypted data relevant to an investigation to hand over the information they have stored when requested by law enforcement. Companies that don’t comply could face fines up to $7.3 million and people involved in not complying could face jail time.

Source: Proposed Australian Law Threatens Apple and Facebook’s Privacy Policies | Fortune

Fighting cybercrime with A.I.

Cybersecurity start-up Darktrace, which uses artificial intelligence to fight cybercrime against corporations. Its artificial intelligence takes inspiration from something distinctly organic: the way the human immune system fights illness. Its machine learning understands normal patterns of behavior of every user and every device connected to a corporate network.

Source: Billion-dollar start-up Darktrace is fighting cybercrime with A.I.

Why companies shouldn’t wait for regulation to step up their privacy practices

It shouldn’t take legislation to motivate companies to re-examine what they do with personal data. All Internet companies must take a stand for privacy. They can do so by stepping up their privacy practices and following a “privacy code of conduct.”

Source: Why companies shouldn’t wait for regulation to step up their privacy practices | TheHill

Hackers Can Turn Body Cameras Into Malware Spewing Machines

Once lauded as tools to enhance police accountability, body cameras have been facing increasing scrutiny from privacy advocates, and now one researcher has identified them as cybersecurity time bombs.

Speaking to Wired ahead of a Def Con presentation, Josh Mitchell, a consultant at the security firm Nuix, demonstrated that many body cameras are vulnerable to hacking, making several different nightmare scenarios possible: officers themselves could be tracked while wearing the cameras, footage could be doctored or deleted entirely, and the cameras could be hijacked to spread ransomware or other malicious code throughout police networks.

Source: Hackers Can Turn Body Cameras Into Malware Spewing Machines, Security Expert Says

Why consumer messaging apps raise business data security fears?

Consumer apps such as WhatsApp are widely used by businesses as a free and easy method of mobile communication, but they have a downside – they aren’t fully secure and they aren’t GDPR compliant when used in the work place. In July 2018 WhatsApp was named by mobile device security company, Appthority , as one of the apps most often blacklisted by businesses.

Read article: The app trap: Why consumer messaging apps raise business data security fears

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