Encryption May Lower Fines Under New EU Privacy Regime

New EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes with high fines – up to 20 million Euros or 4% of company’s global annual revenue – whatever is higher. Though, companies can lower the risk of massive fines by encrypting personal data. Also, companies that encrypt personal data will also be exempt from the GDPR’s new mandatory data breach notification provisions.

Source: Encryption May Lower Fines Under New EU Privacy Regime

You Cannot Encrypt Your Face

Ability to dissent and to do it anonymously was central to fight for independence and founding of the United States. However, latest facial recognition technology, used to fight crime, may eliminate people’s ability to be anonymous. It tracks our body, not devices we use, and is able to identify us from far away and without us knowing it.

Source: You Cannot Encrypt Your Face

Big Data analytics in Europe – the reports of its death are greatly exaggerated

Some say that new EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) is not fit for modern age of Big Data, artificial intelligence (“AI”) and machine learning. They assume that GDPR rules will kill Big Data in Europe.

While it is correct that GDPR will “level up” requirements, it won’t kill Big Data, AI or machine learning or make it illegal. GDPR will require business to about what they’re doing with data but will not prohibit from processing it.

Source: Big Data analytics in Europe – the reports of its death are greatly exaggerated

40,000 Tinder pics scraped into big data service

Developer Stuart Colianni had built a a set of 40,000 facial images by scraping the Tinder dating service arguing that publicly available facial datasets are generally too small to be useful. Dataset with photos was published on Kaggle, but later deleted because of strong criticism.

Source: 40,000 Tinder pics scraped into big data service

Facebook transparency report signals need for privacy guidelines

Facebook released its latest Global Government Requests Report covering the second half of 2016. The report shows that over first half 2016 requests for account data increased by nine percent. Half of the data requests are from law enforcement in the U.S. containing a non-disclosure order that prohibited Facebook from notifying the user on request.

Source: Facebook transparency report signals need for privacy guidelines

Privacy-Related Worries Are Keeping Users From Using E-Commerce, Survey At UNCTAD Finds

A global survey on internet security and trust found users are worried about privacy, and in particularly wary of cybercriminals, internet companies, and governments. This lack of trust is hurting the potential of electronic commerce, the survey revealed.

Source: Privacy-Related Worries Are Keeping Users From Using E-Commerce, Survey At UNCTAD Finds

The Impossible Project of Evading Urban Surveillance

Even in the middle of major city, it’s possible to go off the grid. Last year, theAtlantic profiled a family in Washington, D.C., that harvests their entire household energy from a single, 1-kilowatt solar panel on a patch of cement in their backyard. Insulated, light-blocking blinds keep upstairs bedrooms cool at the peak of summer; in winter, the family gets by with low-tech solutions, like curling up with hot water bottles. “It’s a bit like camping,” one family member said.

Source: The Impossible Project of Evading Urban Surveillance – CityLab

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