Tag Archives for " algorithm "

Algorithms and artificial intelligence: CNIL’s report on the ethical issues

Numerous initiatives on the governance of artificial intelligence are currently being undertaken. In this context, this report aims at giving an overview of the main ethical matters which are raised, and to increase the collective awareness on these issues in civil society.

Source: Algorithms and artificial intelligence: CNIL’s report on the ethical issues

Facial recognition system had 7 percent hit rate at 2017 Champions League Final

NEC system trialled at UEFA Champions League Final by South Wales Police produced almost 2,300 false positives.

South Wales Police said the high number of false positives at the Cardiff final was due to poor quality images supplied by UEFA, Interpol, and other agencies; an old NEC algorithm; and it being the first major deployment.

Source: Facial recognition system had 7 percent hit rate at 2017 Champions League Final | ZDNet

Questions We Need To Be Asking Before Deciding an Algorithm is the Answer

Across the globe, algorithms are quietly but increasingly being relied upon to make important decisions that impact our lives.

This includes determining the number of hours of in-home medical care patients will receive, whether a child is so at risk that child protective services should investigate, if a teacher adds value to a classroom or should be fired , and whether or not someone should continue receiving welfare benefits.

Source: Math Can’t Solve Everything: Questions We Need To Be Asking Before Deciding an Algorithm is the Answer

The privacy pro’s guide to explainability in machine learning

With the GDPR’s implementation date looming, there has been much discussion about whether the regulation requires a “right to an explanation” from machine learning models.

Regardless of the regulation’s effects on machine learning, however, the practical implications of attempting to explain machine learning models presents significant difficulties.

Source: The privacy pro’s guide to explainability in machine learning

The tyranny of algorithms is part of our lives

Credit scores already control our finances. With personal data being increasingly trawled, our politics and our friendships will be next.

For the past couple of years a big story about the future of China has been the focus of both fascination and horror. It is all about what the authorities in Beijing call “social credit”, and the kind of surveillance that is now within governments’ grasp. The official rhetoric is poetic.

According to the documents, what is being developed will “allow the trustworthy to roam everywhere under heaven while making it hard for the discredited to take a single step”.

Source: The tyranny of algorithms is part of our lives: soon they could rate everything we do | John Harris | Opinion | The Guardian

Fairness and Accountability Design Needs for Algorithmic Support in High-Stakes Public Sector Decision-Making

Calls for heightened consideration of fairness and accountability in algorithmically-informed public decisions—like taxation, justice, and child protection—are now commonplace. How might designers support such human values? We interviewed 27 public sector machine learning practitioners across 5 OECD countries regarding challenges understanding and imbuing public values into their work.

Source: [1802.01029] Fairness and Accountability Design Needs for Algorithmic Support in High-Stakes Public Sector Decision-Making

Unfairness By Algorithm: Distilling the Harms of Automated Decision-Making

Analysis of personal data can be used to improve services, advance research, and combat discrimination. However, such analysis can also create valid concerns about differential treatment of individuals or harmful impacts on vulnerable communities.

Source: Unfairness By Algorithm: Distilling the Harms of Automated Decision-Making

In the United States, computers help decide who goes to jail

Every day, judges across the United States face harrowing decisions: How many years should they give the bipolar woman convicted of murder? Should they jail the young—possibly innocent—man awaiting trial, or release him on bail, where he could commit a crime? Facing overflowing dockets, courts are increasingly using computer-based tools to help make those choices. Now, a new study suggests that one widely used tool—an algorithm that calculates “risk scores” for defendants in sentencing or bail hearings—is no better than people armed with a few key pieces of information.

Source: In the United States, computers help decide who goes to jail. But their judgment may be no better than ours | Science | AAAS

Privacy in 2018: Expect the unexpected

Making predictions for the year ahead is possibly as desirable as unreliable. In a world of unlimited data and advanced science, it would be tempting to think that the future is already written. Algorithms and artificial intelligence will show us what lies ahead with immaculate accuracy. Or perhaps not. At least not yet. To say that the world is in turmoil is an understatement and the same is true of the world of privacy and data protection, which makes predicting the future particularly tricky. But since the urge to plan, budget and prepare for what is likely to happen next is so real, now is a good time to pause, reflect about what’s going on, and make some predictions for 2018.

Source: Privacy in 2018: Expect the unexpected

Report on the ethical matters raised by algorithms and artificial intelligence

Public awareness around the role of algorithms and artificial intelligence in our everyday lives has been rising subsequently in the past few months: the role of social media in the U.S. presidential election is an example of such an interest.

Source: How can humans keep the upper hand? Report on the ethical matters raised by algorithms and artificial intelligence

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