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Tag Archives for " Amazon "

Think about privacy the next time you ask Alexa the weather

More and more people are starting to think twice before asking Alexa for the daily forecast. According to a recent PwC survey, 38 percent of participants chose not to purchase a smart device because they “don’t want something listening in on [their lives] all the time.” Additionally, 28 percent of respondents are “concerned about privacy issues with [their] data/security.”

Full article: Think about privacy the next time you ask Alexa the weather

Facial recognition: Apple, Amazon, Google and the race for your face

Facial recognition is a blossoming field of technology that is at once exciting and problematic. If you’ve ever unlocked your iPhone by looking at it, or asked Facebook or Google to go through an unsorted album and show you pictures of your kids, you’ve seen facial recognition in action.

But at the very least, facial recognition raises questions of privacy. Experts have concerns ranging from the overreach of law enforcement, to systems with hidden racial biases, to hackers gaining access to your secure information.

Full article: Facial recognition: Apple, Amazon, Google and the race for your face – CNET

Amazon Is Pushing Facial Technology That a Study Says Could Be Biased

Over the last two years, Amazon has aggressively marketed its facial recognition technology to police departments and federal agencies as a service to help law enforcement identify suspects more quickly.

However, in new tests, Amazon’s system had more difficulty identifying the gender of female and darker-skinned faces than similar services from IBM and Microsoft.

Source: Amazon Is Pushing Facial Technology That a Study Says Could Be Biased – The New York Times

Facebook and Google back changes to laws which break encryption

Industry groups including the representative of tech giants Facebook, Google, Twitter and Amazon, have backed several Labor amendments to the Australia’s encryption bill.

Under Labor’s plan, law enforcement agencies would require a fresh warrant before ordering tech companies to assist or build a new capability to access electronic communications and the bill’s prohibition against creating a “systemic weakness” would be strengthened.

Source: Facebook and Google back Labor changes to laws which break encryption | Technology | The Guardian

Amazon hit with major data breach

Amazon has suffered a major data breach that caused customer names and email addresses to be disclosed on its website, just two days ahead of Black Friday.

The firm said the issue was not a breach of its website or any of its systems, but a technical issue that inadvertently posted customer names and email addresses to its website.

Source: Amazon hit with major data breach days before Black Friday

Amazon is at the center of a debate over public safety versus privacy

As more devices such as voice assistants, home security cameras, appliances and even doorbells come online, the trove of intimate data that technology companies hold is increasing exponentially. People are voluntarily bringing in devices that record their conversations, track their heart rates, and comings-and-goings — all of which produces more intimate and real-time potential evidence that law enforcement might want to help solve crimes.

Full article: The Cybersecurity 202: Amazon is now at the center of a debate over public safety versus privacy – The Washington Post

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Gets Reputation Hit After Data Blunders

Facebook is the least trustworthy of all major tech companies when it comes to safeguarding user data, according to a new national poll conducted for Fortune, highlighting the major challenges the company faces following a series of recent privacy blunders.

Only 22% of Americans said that they trust Facebook with their personal information, far less than Amazon (49%), Google (41%), Microsoft (40%), and Apple (39%).

Full article: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Gets Reputation Hit After Data Blunders | Fortune

Amazon fires employee for allegedly sharing customer email addresses

An Amazon employee was fired after sharing customers’ email addresses with an unnamed third-party seller, in violation of company policies. Amazon said only email addresses were taken by the employee, not any other customer information. The company has already started emailing affected customers about the incident.

A third-party seller is a merchant that sells on Amazon’s website, though the company declined to provide additional information about this seller. It said the seller has been blocked from Amazon.

Source: Amazon fires employee for allegedly sharing customer email addresses – CNET

China reportedly infiltrated Apple and other US companies using ‘spy’ chips on servers

U.S-based server motherboard specialist Supermicro was compromised in China where government-affiliated groups are alleged to have infiltrated its supply chain to attach tiny chips, some merely the size of a pencil tip, to motherboards which ended up in servers deployed in the U.S. The goal was to gain an entry point within company systems to potentially grab IP or confidential information. While the micro-servers themselves were limited in terms of direct capabilities, they represented a “stealth doorway” that could allow China-based operatives to remotely alter how a device functioned to potentially access information.

Source: China reportedly infiltrated Apple and other US companies using ‘spy’ chips on servers | TechCrunch

Silicon Valley finally pushes for data privacy laws at Senate hearing

Amazon, Apple, Google, and others endorsed federal data privacy laws Wednesday, but experts argue consumer voices were lacking It seems Silicon Valley and Congress can finally agree on something after all – the need for data privacy regulation.

Source: Silicon Valley finally pushes for data privacy laws at Senate hearing

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