Tag Archives for " anonymity "

China’s facial-recognition cameras caught suspect tryiing to blend in with 60,000 concertgoers

The man’s unlikely capture became the latest example of China’s growing use of facial recognition technology.

The 31-year-old man, wanted by police, had thought playing a numbers game would be enough to allow him to fade into anonymity.

Source: A suspect tried to blend in with 60,000 concertgoers. China’s facial-recognition cameras caught him. – The Washington Post

How to Delete Your Google Search History in a Few Easy Steps

Deleting your Google web browser history and Google Google search history is one way to limit how much data you allow to be collected about you on the internet. Even if you’re someone who already uses Google’s incognito web browser, you’re still not being kept completely anonymous online.

Believe it or not, there are other web browsers out there besides Google, they are just much less well-known. One example of a search engine that prioritizes user privacy is DuckDuckGo, which is essentially a Google that doesn’t track you online.

Source: How to Delete Your Google Search History in a Few Easy Steps | Money

Four cents to deanonymize: Companies reverse hashed email addresses

Your email address is an excellent identifier for tracking you across devices, websites and apps. Even if you clear cookies, use private browsing mode or change devices, your email address will remain the same.

Due to privacy concerns, tracking companies including ad networks, marketers, and data brokers use the hash of your email address instead, purporting that hashed emails are “non-personally identifying”, “completely private” and “anonymous”. But this is a misleading argument, as hashed email addresses can be reversed to recover original email addresses. In this post we’ll explain why, and explore companies which reverse hashed email addresses as a service.

Source: Four cents to deanonymize: Companies reverse hashed email addresses

Undercover officers need protection from Greenpeace? You’re joking

Anonymity for the police is a privilege. I was undercover for years and can see this privilege is being abused in the spycops inquiry.

“Unlike the officers in the spycops inquiry, I faced real danger and I wasn’t guaranteed anonymity”, says the author and former police officer Neil Woods.

Source: Undercover officers need protection from Greenpeace? You’re joking | Neil Woods | Opinion | The Guardian

Michigan genomic research lab protects data with de-identifier, multilayer platform

The ability to share massive amounts of anonymized human genomic data between accredited hospitals and medical centers is a tremendously important advancement in medicine. However, this genetic treasure trove unleashes a slew of concerns, including the potential for bad actors to hack databases.

Source: Michigan genomic research lab protects data with de-identifier, multilayer platform | Healthcare IT News

The criminals are moving towards privacy coins

Bitcoin is losing its luster with some of its earliest and most avid fans — criminals — giving rise to a new breed of virtual currency.

Privacy coins such as monero, designed to avoid tracking, have climbed faster over the past two months as law enforcers adopt software tools to monitor people using bitcoin. A slew of analytic firms such as Chainalysis are getting better at flagging digital hoards linked to crime or money laundering, alerting exchanges and preventing conversion into traditional cash.

Source: The Criminal Underworld Is Dropping Bitcoin for Another Currency – Bloomberg

How “anonymous” wifi data can still be a privacy risk

The thorny issue of tracking of location data without risking individual privacy is very neatly illustrated via a Freedom of Information (FOI) request asking London’s transport regulator to release the “anonymized” data-set it generated from a four week trial last year when it tracked metro users in the UK capital via wi-fi nodes and the MAC address of their smartphones as they traveled around its network.

Source: How “anonymous” wifi data can still be a privacy risk – TechCrunch

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