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Tag Archives for " anonymity "

Does anonymization or de-identification require consent under the GDPR?

Data de-identification has many benefits in the context of the EU General Data Protection Regulation.

One of the recurring questions is whether consent is required to anonymize or de-identify data. In this article, we make the case that no consent is required for anonymization or other forms of de-identification.

Full article: Does anonymization or de-identification require consent under the GDPR?

Austrian DPA takes “result-oriented perspective” in data erasure decision

The Austrian data protection authority (‘DSB’) published, on 30 January 2019, its decision, dated 5 December 2018, on the right to data erasure, further to an individual’s complaint.

In particular, the DSB highlighted that the complainant had alleged that an unnamed insurance company had infringed his right to data erasure by only deleting data stored for marketing purposes and anonymising the remainder.

Full article: Austria: DSB takes “result-oriented perspective” in data erasure decision

Does anonymization or de-identification require consent under the GDPR?

Data de-identification has many benefits in the context of the EU General Data Protection Regulation . One of the recurring questions is whether consent is required to anonymize or de-identify data. In this article, we make the case that no consent is required for anonymization or other forms of de-identification.

Full article: Does anonymization or de-identification require consent under the GDPR?

‘Data is a fingerprint’: why you aren’t as anonymous as you think online

So-called ‘anonymous’ data can be easily used to identify everything from our medical records to purchase histories. By analysing a mobile phone database of the approximate locations (based on the nearest cell tower) of 1.5 million people over 15 months (with no other identifying information) it was possible to uniquely identify 95% of the people with just four data points of places and times. About 50% could be identified from just two points.

Source: ‘Data is a fingerprint’: why you aren’t as anonymous as you think online | World news | The Guardian

Are there risks of using public clinical trial data under GDPR?

Given that clinical trial documents contain personally identifying health information about trial participants, it is necessary to anonymize these documents. While there are efforts among the agencies to harmonize their anonymization guidance and practices, they are governed by different privacy laws and are implementing quite a different anonymization methodology. This raises the question of what the risks would be to the users of these public clinical trial documents if the anonymization performed for a public data release was not adequate and the public documents still have a high risk of re-identification?

Read full article: Are there risks of using public clinical trial data under GDPR?

Top EU Court Embraces Anonymity for Litigants

Starting with July 1 the European Court of Justice (CJEU) no longer plans to identify people who are the subject of future preliminary rulings by replacing, in all its public documents, the name of natural persons involved in the case by initials. However, the court emphasized it retains the right to derogate from this plan “in the event of an express request from a party or if the particular circumstances of the case so justify.” There is no plan to alter how the court handles hearings or other proceedings that do not involve publications.

Source: Top EU Court Embraces Anonymity for Litigants

China’s facial-recognition cameras caught suspect tryiing to blend in with 60,000 concertgoers

The man’s unlikely capture became the latest example of China’s growing use of facial recognition technology.

The 31-year-old man, wanted by police, had thought playing a numbers game would be enough to allow him to fade into anonymity.

Source: A suspect tried to blend in with 60,000 concertgoers. China’s facial-recognition cameras caught him. – The Washington Post

How to Delete Your Google Search History in a Few Easy Steps

Deleting your Google web browser history and Google Google search history is one way to limit how much data you allow to be collected about you on the internet. Even if you’re someone who already uses Google’s incognito web browser, you’re still not being kept completely anonymous online.

Believe it or not, there are other web browsers out there besides Google, they are just much less well-known. One example of a search engine that prioritizes user privacy is DuckDuckGo, which is essentially a Google that doesn’t track you online.

Source: How to Delete Your Google Search History in a Few Easy Steps | Money

Four cents to deanonymize: Companies reverse hashed email addresses

Your email address is an excellent identifier for tracking you across devices, websites and apps. Even if you clear cookies, use private browsing mode or change devices, your email address will remain the same.

Due to privacy concerns, tracking companies including ad networks, marketers, and data brokers use the hash of your email address instead, purporting that hashed emails are “non-personally identifying”, “completely private” and “anonymous”. But this is a misleading argument, as hashed email addresses can be reversed to recover original email addresses. In this post we’ll explain why, and explore companies which reverse hashed email addresses as a service.

Source: Four cents to deanonymize: Companies reverse hashed email addresses

Undercover officers need protection from Greenpeace? You’re joking

Anonymity for the police is a privilege. I was undercover for years and can see this privilege is being abused in the spycops inquiry.

“Unlike the officers in the spycops inquiry, I faced real danger and I wasn’t guaranteed anonymity”, says the author and former police officer Neil Woods.

Source: Undercover officers need protection from Greenpeace? You’re joking | Neil Woods | Opinion | The Guardian

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