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Tag Archives for " app "

Clubhouse Data Leak – 1.3M SQL Database Leaked Online

An SQL database containing 1.3 million Clubhouse user records has been leaked for free on a popular hacker forum.

Clubhouse has issued a statement about the incident on social media, saying they have not experienced a breach of their systems. The company said that the data is already publicly available and that it can be accessed by “anyone” via their API.

In addition to sparking a heated debate under the company’s statement on Twitter, this raises some questions about the privacy stance of the company: allowing everyone to gather and download even public profile information on a mass scale can have severe negative consequences for user privacy.

Source: Clubhouse Data Leak – 1.3M SQL Database Leaked Online | CyberNews

Apple Is Rejecting Apps That Use Third-Party Code For Alleged Privacy Infractions

Apple started rejecting app updates on Thursday that conflict with its App Tracking Tracking Transparency (ATT) framework.

ATT prohibits user tracking without explicit consent and bans developers from using fingerprinting to try and identify a device or user.

Developers using a software development kit from the mobile attribution firm Adjust received a rejection message from Apple stating that their app “uses algorithmically converted device and usage data to create a unique identifier in order to track the user” or so called device “fingerprinting.”

Source: Apple Is Rejecting Apps That Use Third-Party Code For Alleged Privacy Infractions | AdExchanger

Are the parental control apps we use to protect our kids actually unsafe too?

Children are spending more time online and many parents are concerned about screen time, cybersafety and internet addiction. An increasingly popular technical solution is parental control apps.

But such a quick fix is inadequate when addressing the complicated reasons behind screen time. Much worse though, the apps expose users to privacy and other safety issues most people aren’t aware of.

Parental control apps need many permissions to access particular systems and functions on devices. And many of these apps embed data hungry third-party software development kits (SDKs) – many popular parental control apps in the Google Play Store have extensive security and privacy vulnerabilities due to SDKs.

Full article: Are the parental control apps we use to protect our kids actually unsafe too?

Facebook Is Building An Instagram For Kids

Executives at Instagram are planning to build a version of the popular photo-sharing app that can be used by children under the age of 13, according to an internal company post obtained by BuzzFeed News.

Current Instagram policy forbids children under the age of 13 from using the service. The internal announcement comes two days after Instagram said it needs to do more to protect its youngest users.  The development of an Instagram product for kids follows the 2017 launch of Messenger Kids, a Facebook product aimed at children between the ages of 6 and 12.

Source: Facebook Is Building An Instagram For Kids

How to Use Clubhouse Without Giving Up Your Data

The buzzy social-networking app Clubhouse has been scrambling in recent weeks to respond to concerns from privacy and security experts about how the service collects and safeguards user data.

You don’t have to give Clubhouse access to every single contact in your phone to use the app, but doing so is the only way you can invite other users to Clubhouse. If you’ve already shared your contacts, the Clubhouse spokesperson says you can revoke access to the list using the settings app on your iPhone and contact Clubhouse support to delete all previous data.

But that doesn’t stop other users from uploading your phone number along with their contact lists—and that’s become a sore spot for people who don’t even use the app.

Clubhouse had turned on geofencing to limit users to servers in specific regions—excluding mainland China, for example. It also took steps to enable encryption that would limit Agora’s access to raw audio data. But Agora currently still has access to metadata, raw audio data, and the encryption keys.

However, security and privacy experts doesn’t recommend using Clubhouse for sensitive conversations, particularly if you’re concerned about information landing in the hands of the Chinese government.

Source: How to Use Clubhouse Without Giving Up Your Data – Consumer Reports

Why hot new social app Clubhouse spells nothing but trouble

Clubhouse was founded in April last year and gained modest traction in the early phases of the pandemic after a $12m investment by Andreessen Horowitz, the noisiest venture capital firm in Silicon Valley, at which point it had 1,500 users and was valued at $100m.

But the hoopla tended to obscure some uncomfortable facts about Clubhouse. There’s the contact-uploading requirements mentioned earlier which, as one commentator put it, are not only “telling the app developer that you’re connected to those people, but you’re also telling it that those people are connected to you – which they might or might not have wanted the app to know.

Source: Why hot new social app Clubhouse spells nothing but trouble | Social media | The Guardian

Facebook prompt will encourage ad tracking opt-in ahead of Apple’s privacy push

Facebook will begin showing a prompt on its mobile app for the iPhone and iPad that’s designed to convince users to allow ad tracking, in preparation for an upcoming privacy change in which Apple will force developers to obtain permission to track users across apps and websites in the future.

The prompt will give users a page of information detailing why Facebook thinks a user should give the company permission to track them on iOS. The company argues doing so will make ads more personalized and help support businesses that rely on advertising.

Source: Facebook prompt will encourage ad tracking opt-in ahead of Apple’s privacy push – The Verge

Apple’s App Tracking Transparency feature will be enabled by default and arrive in ‘early spring’ on iOS

Apple first announced at WWDC in June that app developers would have to ask users for permission in order to track and share their IDFA identifier for cross-property ad targeting purposes.  The plan is to launch these changes in early spring, with a version of the feature coming in the next iOS 14 beta release.

The App Tracking Transparency feature moves from the old method where you had to opt-out of sharing your Identifier for Advertisers (IDFA) to an opt-in model. This means that every app will have to ask you up front whether it is ok for them to share your IDFA with third parties including networks or data brokers.

Source: Apple’s App Tracking Transparency feature will be enabled by default and arrive in ‘early spring’ on iOS | TechCrunch

More than half App Store privacy labels false in small-scale spot checks

Apple made them mandatory for developers submitting new apps or updating new ones. Facebook Messenger came under particular fire for the sheer volume of data linked to users.

But spot-checks by the Washington Post found that more than half the apps they reviewed were either misleading or completely false. Apple did say earlier this week that it relies in developers to be honest, and only responds reactively when they lie.

Source: More than half App Store privacy labels false in small-scale Washington Post spot checks – 9to5Mac

App Claims It Can Detect ‘Trustworthiness’

DeepScore, a Tokyo-based company, says its app can determine how trustworthy a person is in just one minute.

Here’s how it works: A person—seeking a business loan or coverage for health insurance, perhaps—looks into their phone camera and answers a short series of questions. Where do you live? How do you intend to use the money? Do you have a history of cancer? DeepScore analyzes the muscular twitches in their face and the changes in their voice and delivers a verdict to the lender or insurer. This person is trustworthy, this person is probably not.

Privacy and human rights advocates are alarmed by DeepScore’s premise—that the minute signals captured by facial and vocal recognition algorithms reliably correspond to something as subjective and varied as a person’s honesty.

Source: This App Claims It Can Detect ‘Trustworthiness.’ It Can’t

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