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Tag Archives for " app "

Apps Checking Covid-19 Symptoms Pose Data Collection Risks

Insurers and health tech companies developing mobile apps to let patients track Covid-19 symptoms and connect with doctors need to be mindful that their data storage practices don’t run afoul of federal and state privacy laws, attorneys said.

Developers of mobile apps and websites aimed at fighting the virus still have to navigate state privacy laws and a host of other regulations, like those from the Federal Trade Commission.

Source: Apps Checking Covid-19 Symptoms Pose Data Collection Risks

Clearview AI Reportedly Worked On a Mug Shot Repository to Go With Its Face Recognition App

The controversial facial recognition firm Clearview AI has already landed in hot water for purportedly letting both law enforcement and rich investors play around in its database of billions of photos scraped from the public internet.

However, a new report suggests the company didn’t just stop there. Apparently, at one point Clearview AI aimed to compile a nationwide repository of mug shots from the last 15 years.

Source: Clearview AI Reportedly Worked On a Mug Shot Repository to Go With Its Face Recognition App

Android surveillanceware operators jump on the coronavirus fear bandwagon

Researchers have uncovered a mobile surveillance campaign that has used more than 30 malicious Android apps to spy on targets over the past 11 months. Two of the most recent samples are exploiting the coronavirus by hiding off-the-shelf surveillanceware inside apps that promise to provide information about the ongoing pandemic.

One of the apps, “corona live 1.1,” is a trojanized version of “corona live,” a legitimate app that provides an interface to data found on tracker from Johns Hopkins University. Buried inside the spoofed app is a sample of SpyMax, a commercially available piece of surveillanceware that gives attackers real-time control of infected devices.

A second app used in the same campaign is called “Crona.” The campaign, which has been active since April 2019 at the latest, was discovered by researchers from mobile-security provider Lookout.

Source: Android surveillanceware operators jump on the coronavirus fear bandwagon | Ars Technica

Surveillance Firm Banjo Used a Secret Company and Fake Apps to Scrape Social Media

One former employee said the secret company called Pink Unicorn Labs was doing the same thing as Cambridge Analytica, “but more nefariously, arguably.”

Banjo, an artificial intelligence firm that works with police used a shadow company to create an array of Android and iOS apps that looked innocuous but were specifically designed to secretly scrape social media. This was done to avoid detection by social networks. The news signifies an abuse of data by a government contractor, with Banjo going far beyond what companies which scrape social networks usually do.

Source: Surveillance Firm Banjo Used a Secret Company and Fake Apps to Scrape Social Media – VICE

Facebook postpones launch of dating app

Facebook has been forced into an embarrassing postponement of its new dating service all across Europe 36 hours before Valentine’s Day after Ireland’s Data Protection Commission stepped in.

The regulatory body, which oversees Facebook’s operation across the EU, sent agents to the social media giant’s offices in Dublin because Facebook had not informed the regulatory body of the launch.

Source: Hours from Valentine’s Day, Helen Dixon says no to Facebook’s European dating service rollout – Independent.ie

Grindr and OKCupid Sell Your Data, but Twitter’s MoPub Is the Real Problem

On January 15, a Norweigian Consumer Council (NCC) investigative report exposed the ways that Grindr, OKCupid, and eight other apps are collecting and sharing extremely sensitive personal data.

A third-party advertising company called MoPub, owned by Twitter, was responsible for much of the technology that Grindr used to collect and share data. MoPub operates in the vast, convoluted, opaque ecosystem of personal data collection and sharing that powers modern adtech.

Source: Grindr and OKCupid Sell Your Data, but Twitter’s MoPub Is the Real Problem | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Tinder’s Panic Button Partner, Noonlight, Shares Data With Third Parties

Tinder has a proven track record of providing a dating platform to some less-than-stellar men who have been accused of raping—and in one grisly case, dismembering—women they’ve met through the platform.

With the help of a company called Noonlight, Tinder users will be able to share the details of their date—and their given location—in the event that law enforcement needs to get involved. However, it turns out that the app sends data to handful of major names in the ad tech space—including Facebook and Google-owned YouTube—gleaning details about the app every minute.

Source: Tinder’s Panic Button Partner, Noonlight, Shares Data With Third Parties

14% of Android app privacy policies contain contradictions about data collection

An analysis of 11,430 Play Store apps found that 14.2% used a privacy policy with contradicting statements about user data collection practices.

Examples include privacy policies that stated in one section that they do not collect personal data, only to contradict themselves in subsequent sections, where they state they collect emails or customer names — which are clearly personally-idenfiable information. Self-contradictions can lead to the identification of deceptive statements, which are enforceable by the FTC and the DPAs (data protection authorities) of the EU.

Source: 14% of Android app privacy policies contain contradictions about data collection | ZDNet

Facebook is ordered to hand over data about thousands of apps that may have violated user privacy

A Massachusetts judge rejected the tech giant’s earlier attempt to withhold the evidence from state officials investigating its privacy practices.

Massachusetts revealed it was probing Facebook over its data-collection practices in September, an investigation that stemmed from the company’s entanglement with Cambridge Analytica.

Source: Massachusetts court orders Facebook to hand over data on apps that may have violated users’ privacy – The Washington Post

Top Apps Invade User Privacy By Collecting and Sharing Personal Data

A new report published today by the Norwegian Consumer Council (NCC) looks at the hidden side of the data economy and its findings are alarming.

Scrutinizing 10 popular apps in Google Play Store, such as Grindr, Clue, and Perfect365, the NCC report’s technical analysis reveals comprehensive tracking and profiling practices. Personal data is systematically collected and shared with dozens of third-party companies without users’ knowledge.

Source: Top Apps Invade User Privacy By Collecting and Sharing Personal Data, New Report Finds

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