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Tag Archives for " Apple "

As Apple stakes out an aggressive pro-privacy stance, Google occupies middle ground

The ad industry has been bracing for more privacy-focused upheaval in the coming months, from lawmakers and data regulators or from privacy-zealous browsers. As Google has put forward alternative plans for a privacy-focused and ad-funded web, it has also been asking the industry for feedback. This is a markedly different approach to Apple’s muscular stance of ultimate user privacy by default.

Google, as a predominantly ad-funded business with a lot more skin in the game, is revealing itself to be much more collaborative with the industry as it’s forming its approach. , Google has been exploring what restricted third-party cookie use in Chrome would look like by releasing industry research on how it would impact publisher revenue, laying out proposals for building a more private web, and using machine learning to manage ad frequency.

Full article: As Apple stakes out an aggressive pro-privacy stance, Google occupies middle ground – Digiday

Apple is now presenting its privacy policy as if it were another product

Apple eleased a new privacy page that makes its privacy policy easier to read and understand. The new privacy page looks more like a product page than your standard screen of black and white text.

The new page brings in Apple’s design aesthetic, so it’s not just full of text. Most importantly, the update does make Apple’s privacy policies easier to read or skim. The policies themselves have not changed.

Source: Apple is now presenting its privacy policy as if it were another product | Engadget

Apple Shares Some Browsing History with Chinese Company

The company acknowledged it’s using ‘safe browsing’ technology from Tencent, which has ties to the Chinese government.

Apple is sending some browsing history of iOS 13 Safari users to Tencent Holdings Limited, a Chinese multinational conglomerate. The data shared is tied to the Safari Safe Browsing technology. Revelations of the relationship have drawn criticism from security and privacy experts.

Source: Apple Shares Some Browsing History with Chinese Company | Threatpost

Mysterious iOS Attack Changes Everything We Know About iPhone Hacking

For two years, a handful of websites have indiscriminately hacked thousands of iPhones.

The rare and intricate chains of code took advantage of a total of 14 security flaws, targeting everything from the browser’s “sandbox” isolation mechanism to the core of the operating system known as the kernel, ultimately gaining complete control over the phone.

Source: Mysterious iOS Attack Changes Everything We Know About iPhone Hacking | WIRED

Developers accuse Apple of anti-competitive behavior with its privacy changes in iOS 13

A group of app developers have penned a letter to Apple CEO Tim Cook, arguing that certain privacy-focused changes to Apple’s iOS 13 operating system will hurt their business.

The developers accused Apple of anti-competitive behavior when it comes to how apps can access user location data. With iOS 13, Apple aims to curtail apps’ abuse of its location-tracking features as part of its larger privacy focus as a company, introducing “Allow Once” option and hiding option “Always Allow” in iOS settings.

Source: Developers accuse Apple of anti-competitive behavior with its privacy changes in iOS 13 | TechCrunch

Apple contractors ‘regularly hear confidential details’ on Siri recordings

Apple contractors regularly hear confidential medical information, drug deals, and recordings of couples having sex, as part of their job providing quality control, or “grading”, the company’s Siri voice assistant.

Although Apple does not explicitly disclose it in its consumer-facing privacy documentation, a small proportion of Siri recordings are passed on to contractors working for the company around the world.

Source: Apple contractors ‘regularly hear confidential details’ on Siri recordings

EU regulator launches third Apple investigation

The principle regulator for Apple in Europe, the Irish Data Protection Commission, has begun a third investigation into data privacy standards at the tech giant.

Speaking this week, a spokesperson for the Irish DPC confirmed that Apple’s compliancy with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will go under examination for the third time in the last month.

Source: EU regulator launches third Apple investigation

Apple is making corporate ‘BYOD’ programs less invasive to user privacy

When people bring their own devices to work or school, they don’t want IT administrators to manage the entire device.

But until now, Apple only offered two ways for IT to manage its iOS devices: either device enrollments, which offered device-wide management capabilities to admins or those same device management capabilities combined with an automated setup process. At Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference last week, the company announced plans to introduce a third method: user enrollments.

Source: Apple is making corporate ‘BYOD’ programs less invasive to user privacy | TechCrunch

Apple is now the privacy-as-a-service company

Apple unveiled a new single-sign on unified ID platform, as well as a new way it’ll operate as a go-between for security cameras that work with its HomeKit smart home services.

Apple has been playing up its privacy game for at least a few years now. Their announcements really crystallize how Apple’s approach to privacy will mesh with its transformation into becoming even more of a services company. It’s becoming a services company with a key differentiator – privacy – and it’s also extending that paradigm to third-parties, acting as an ecosystem layer that mediates between users, and anyone who would seek to monetize their info in aggregate.

Full article: Apple is now the privacy-as-a-service company | TechCrunch

1 year into GDPR, ad industry braces for more fines

Complacency is a dangerous mistress. But it’s a trap many companies are in danger of falling into when it comes to the General Data Protection Regulation, according to advertising sources.

The temptation to do as little as possible, so as to maintain ad revenues, is high. And with no seriously worrying fines levied yet at businesses, several publishers that had taken a strict approach to consent, have started to loosen their terms in order not to feel punished by falling ad revenues while their rivals flourish.

Full article: ‘We’ve only just started’: 1 year into GDPR, ad industry braces for more fines – Digiday

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