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Tag Archives for " Apple "

Apple contractors ‘regularly hear confidential details’ on Siri recordings

Apple contractors regularly hear confidential medical information, drug deals, and recordings of couples having sex, as part of their job providing quality control, or “grading”, the company’s Siri voice assistant.

Although Apple does not explicitly disclose it in its consumer-facing privacy documentation, a small proportion of Siri recordings are passed on to contractors working for the company around the world.

Source: Apple contractors ‘regularly hear confidential details’ on Siri recordings

EU regulator launches third Apple investigation

The principle regulator for Apple in Europe, the Irish Data Protection Commission, has begun a third investigation into data privacy standards at the tech giant.

Speaking this week, a spokesperson for the Irish DPC confirmed that Apple’s compliancy with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will go under examination for the third time in the last month.

Source: EU regulator launches third Apple investigation

Apple is making corporate ‘BYOD’ programs less invasive to user privacy

When people bring their own devices to work or school, they don’t want IT administrators to manage the entire device.

But until now, Apple only offered two ways for IT to manage its iOS devices: either device enrollments, which offered device-wide management capabilities to admins or those same device management capabilities combined with an automated setup process. At Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference last week, the company announced plans to introduce a third method: user enrollments.

Source: Apple is making corporate ‘BYOD’ programs less invasive to user privacy | TechCrunch

Apple is now the privacy-as-a-service company

Apple unveiled a new single-sign on unified ID platform, as well as a new way it’ll operate as a go-between for security cameras that work with its HomeKit smart home services.

Apple has been playing up its privacy game for at least a few years now. Their announcements really crystallize how Apple’s approach to privacy will mesh with its transformation into becoming even more of a services company. It’s becoming a services company with a key differentiator – privacy – and it’s also extending that paradigm to third-parties, acting as an ecosystem layer that mediates between users, and anyone who would seek to monetize their info in aggregate.

Full article: Apple is now the privacy-as-a-service company | TechCrunch

1 year into GDPR, ad industry braces for more fines

Complacency is a dangerous mistress. But it’s a trap many companies are in danger of falling into when it comes to the General Data Protection Regulation, according to advertising sources.

The temptation to do as little as possible, so as to maintain ad revenues, is high. And with no seriously worrying fines levied yet at businesses, several publishers that had taken a strict approach to consent, have started to loosen their terms in order not to feel punished by falling ad revenues while their rivals flourish.

Full article: ‘We’ve only just started’: 1 year into GDPR, ad industry braces for more fines – Digiday

Apple has a plan to make online ads more private

Apple says it’s figured out some middle ground that keeps ads alive but without their nefarious ad tracking capabilities. The tech giant came up with Privacy Preserving Ad Click Attribution.

Ads don’t need to share with anyone else that you bought something from an online store. Ads just need to know that someone — and not an identifiable person — clicked on an ad on a site and bought something on another.

Source: Apple has a plan to make online ads more private | TechCrunch

Apple Face-Recognition Blamed for False Arrest

A New York student sued Apple Inc. for $1 billion, claiming the company’s facial-recognition software falsely linked him to a series of thefts from Apple stores.

Ousmane Bah, 18, said he was arrested at his home in New York in November and charged with stealing from an Apple store. The arrest warrant included a photo that didn’t resemble Bah, he said in a lawsuit filed Monday. Apple said it doesn’t use facial recognition in its stores.

Source: Apple Face-Recognition Blamed by N.Y. Teen for False Arrest – Bloomberg

WTF is differential privacy?

Differential privacy allows companies to share aggregate data about user habits while protecting individual privacy.

It’s a process used to aggregate data that was pioneered by Microsoft and is now used by Apple, Google and other big tech companies. In a nutshell, a differential privacy algorithm injects random data into a data set to protect individual privacy.

Full article: WTF is differential privacy? – Digiday

How the tragic death of Do Not Track ruined the web for everyone

A decade ago, a simple browser setting – called Do Not Track – promised to make it easy to protect your online privacy from nosy advertisers. To opt out of being tracked, you’d check a box in your browser’s settings.

It was a great idea. Too bad it never came anywhere near to living up to its promise.

For all practical purposes, DNT died years ago. But Apple’s removal of the Do Not Track preference from Safari for Macs and iOS in an update in early February officially signaled the end of what might have been a workable understanding between consumers and the advertisers that rely on ad-tech networks to target them.

Full article: How the tragic death of Do Not Track ruined the web for everyone

Facial recognition: Apple, Amazon, Google and the race for your face

Facial recognition is a blossoming field of technology that is at once exciting and problematic. If you’ve ever unlocked your iPhone by looking at it, or asked Facebook or Google to go through an unsorted album and show you pictures of your kids, you’ve seen facial recognition in action.

But at the very least, facial recognition raises questions of privacy. Experts have concerns ranging from the overreach of law enforcement, to systems with hidden racial biases, to hackers gaining access to your secure information.

Full article: Facial recognition: Apple, Amazon, Google and the race for your face – CNET

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