Tag Archives for " Artificial Intelligence "

TheStreet and Seal Software to use AI for GDPR

Global financial news and services company, TheStreet, co-founded by TV stocks pundit, Jim Cramer, has broadened its relationship with legal AI pioneer, Seal Software, to leverage its capabilities for a broader range of contract analysis uses, as well as to help with GDPR compliance issues.

Source: TheStreet Expands Use of Seal Software, Also Uses For GDPR – Artificial Lawyer

Irish Firm, McCann FitzGerald, Taps Neota Logic for GDPR Application

Leading Irish law firm, McCann FitzGerald, has today launched a GDPR analysis tool that leverages Neota Logic’s ‘Intelligent Reasoning’ technology. The GDPR app, called ‘GDPR Gap Analysis’, will, says the firm, ‘enable organisations to quickly assess their own level of GDPR compliance and identify areas of major risk where they need to focus their compliance efforts’.

Source: Irish Firm, McCann FitzGerald, Taps Neota Logic for GDPR Application – Artificial Lawyer

Thomson Reuters Builds AI Data Privacy Q&A Tool with IBM Watson

Thomson Reuters is introducing a new AI-driven tool, Data Privacy Advisor, powered by IBM’s Watson suite of machine learning technology.

The tool is ‘a specialised data privacy research solution that brings the company’s collection of global legal and regulatory information together with expansive data privacy guidance from Practical Law editors, curated news, and a question-answering feature built by artificial intelligence and technology professionals from Thomson Reuters and IBM Watson.’

Source: Thomson Reuters Builds AI Data Privacy Q&A Tool with IBM Watson

The real risks of artificial intelligence

AI professor and author Toby Walsh discusses the dangers of ‘stupid’ artificial intelligence with Jack Stilgoe.

Professor Toby Walsh has recently published a book – Android Dreams – giving a researcher’s perspective on the uncertainties and opportunities of artificial intelligence. Here, he explains to Jack Stilgoe that we should worry more about the short-term risks of stupid AI in self-driving cars and smartphones than the speculative risks of super-intelligence.

Source: The real risks of artificial intelligence | Science | The Guardian

In the United States, computers help decide who goes to jail

Every day, judges across the United States face harrowing decisions: How many years should they give the bipolar woman convicted of murder? Should they jail the young—possibly innocent—man awaiting trial, or release him on bail, where he could commit a crime? Facing overflowing dockets, courts are increasingly using computer-based tools to help make those choices. Now, a new study suggests that one widely used tool—an algorithm that calculates “risk scores” for defendants in sentencing or bail hearings—is no better than people armed with a few key pieces of information.

Source: In the United States, computers help decide who goes to jail. But their judgment may be no better than ours | Science | AAAS

AI offers opportunity to increase privacy for users

Technology pundits frequently lament that our increasingly digital world has eroded consumer privacy by enabling businesses to collect and use more personal data. However, what is often lost in the conversation is that the growing use of artificial intelligence actually increases the potential for consumer privacy by reducing the number of humans who see their personal information.

Source: AI offers opportunity to increase privacy for users

Privacy in 2018: Expect the unexpected

Making predictions for the year ahead is possibly as desirable as unreliable. In a world of unlimited data and advanced science, it would be tempting to think that the future is already written. Algorithms and artificial intelligence will show us what lies ahead with immaculate accuracy. Or perhaps not. At least not yet. To say that the world is in turmoil is an understatement and the same is true of the world of privacy and data protection, which makes predicting the future particularly tricky. But since the urge to plan, budget and prepare for what is likely to happen next is so real, now is a good time to pause, reflect about what’s going on, and make some predictions for 2018.

Source: Privacy in 2018: Expect the unexpected

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