fbpx

Free tools and resources for Data Protection Officers!

Tag Archives for " Australia "

Parliament of Australia passes consumer data right bill

The Parliament of Australia passed, on 1 August 2019, the Treasury Laws Amendment (Consumer Data Right) Bill 2019 (‘the Bill’), which amends the Competition and Consumer Act 2010, the Australian Information Commissioner Act 2010, and the Privacy Act 1988 (‘the Privacy Act’), to introduce a data portability right for consumers in the form of a consumer data right (‘CDR’).

In particular, the Bill, which currently applies to the banking sector and will soon apply to the energy and telecommunication sectors, allows individuals and businesses to access specified data related to them and held by businesses, as well as authorises secure access to this data by accredited third parties.

Source: Australia: Parliament passes consumer data right bill

Right to delete is coming to Australia

Shadow Assistant Treasurer Stephen Jones said his party secured a “breakthrough commitment” from the government that would see the Consumer Data Right (CDR) gain the ability have consumer information deleted.

This new legislation will give Australian consumers an “off switch” when it comes to data sharing. Off switch would mean that a consumer will have the power to determine when a company should no longer hold their data.

Source: Labor thinks the right to delete is coming for Australia’s CDR after winter break | ZDNet

Fingerprint case highlights importance of biometric policies and consent

An unfair dismissal case has highlighted the need for companies to update policies and procedures and to obtain full consent before using biometric data in the workplace.

The Fair Work Commission in Australia found that Superior Wood employee’s dismissal for refusing to use a fingerprint scanner was unfair because the company did not have a privacy policy in place; it didn’t obtain consent before collecting sensitive information, and it failed to issue a privacy collection notice.

Full article: Fingerprint case highlights importance of biometric policies and consent

Australia’s anti-encryption collision with GDPR sub-processing

On Dec. 6, Australia passed a surprising law with a global impact on privacy.

The new law requires any Australian company to build backdoors to encrypted data and communications when instructed to do so by the government, while also requiring secrecy about the existence of such surveillance capabilities from individuals and enterprise customers. This unverifiable question of compromised encryption presents many technical threats and introduces international regulatory compliance challenges as well.

Full article: Australia’s anti-encryption collision with GDPR sub-processing

Australia’s horrific new encryption law likely to obliterate its tech scene

Australia‘s government signed a bill into law last week giving law enforcement agencies the right to force technology companies to reveal users’ encrypted messages. Another way of putting it: Australia‘s tech scene will soon be located on the Wayback Machine.

The law was introduced as the Telecommunications and Other Legislation Amendment (Assistance and Access) Bill 2018, but now it’s official. And there’s a lot to be concerned about, even if you don’t live or work in Australia.

Full article: Australia’s horrific new encryption law likely to obliterate its tech scene

Australian bill spells trouble for data privacy around the world

ech companies, start-ups and digital consumer rights groups has locked horns with the Australian government over its proposed anti-data encryption law, currently under review by the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security (PJCIS).

Now, concerns are rising over just how far world governments, including the United States, will go to compromise citizen’s liberties for the sake of national security.

Full article: Australian bill spells trouble for data privacy around the world | TheHill

Google and Facebook join rights groups to fight Australia’s encryption bill

Google and Facebook have joined civil and digital rights groups in an unusual alliance aimed at defeating Australia’s planned encryption laws. The bill gives law enforcement new powers to conduct covert surveillance on electronic devices and compel technology companies to assist in decrypting private communications.

Source: Google and Facebook join rights groups to fight Australia’s encryption bill | Technology | The Guardian

Australia’s spyware law could expose phones to exploitation

Peter Dutton’s proposed legislation to expand the government’s surveillance capabilities into telecommunication devices through the inclusion of spyware risks could create “systemic weakness or vulnerability” that would be open to exploitation, Australia’s peak industry group has warned.

The Australian Industry Group has responded to the call for consultation on the assistance and access bill by warning of unintended consequences from the home affairs minister’s push to force telcos and tech giants, including Apple, Samsung, Google and Facebook, to include concealed “backdoors” into devices and messaging platforms.

Source: Australia’s spyware law could expose phones to exploitation, business group warns

Tech industry told ‘privacy is not absolute’ and end-to-end encryption ‘should be rare’

An international network of intelligence agencies, so-called Five Eyes nations – the US, UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, in a joint communiqué and statement of principles has told the tech industry that ‘privacy is not an absolute’ and that the use of end-to-end encryption ‘should be rare’.

The statement on privacy contains a veiled threat to tech companies that they may face legislation if they don’t take steps to ensure that they can allow access to ‘appropriate government authorities.’

Source: Tech industry told ‘privacy is not absolute’ and end-to-end encryption ‘should be rare’ | 9to5Mac

Australian Law Draft Requires Companies to share Encryption Data

The Australian government has proposed a new law that would force tech companies that have encrypted data relevant to an investigation to hand over the information they have stored when requested by law enforcement. Companies that don’t comply could face fines up to $7.3 million and people involved in not complying could face jail time.

Source: Proposed Australian Law Threatens Apple and Facebook’s Privacy Policies | Fortune

1 2 3 5
>