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Tag Archives for " biometrics "

China Uses DNA to Map Faces, With Help From the West

Beijing’s pursuit of control over a Muslim ethnic group pushes the rules of science and raises questions about consent.

The technology, which is also being developed in the United States and elsewhere, is in the early stages of development and can produce rough pictures good enough only to narrow a manhunt or perhaps eliminate suspects. But in the long term it may even be possible for the government to feed images produced from a DNA sample into the mass surveillance and facial recognition systems that it is building, tightening its grip on society by improving its ability to track dissidents and protesters as well as criminals.

Source: China Uses DNA to Map Faces, With Help From the West – The New York Times

DHS May Require U.S. Citizens Be Photographed at Airports

Federal officials are considering requiring that all travelers — including American citizens — be photographed as they enter or leave the country as part of an identification system using facial-recognition technology.

The Department of Homeland Security says it expects to publish a proposed rule next July. Facial recognition is already being tested by several airlines at a number of U.S. airports.

Source: DHS May Require U.S. Citizens Be Photographed at Airports | Time

Biometric systems to expand in airport security

Biometric Systems segment of the market is anticipated to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period, in terms of the role such technology plays in airport security.

Various airports and airlines are currently testing and using biometrics in the airports to speed up various airport processes like check-in and security check or passport control.

Source: #Privacy: Biometric systems to expand in airport security

DNA test kits threaten kids’ privacy in ways we can’t understand yet

You don’t have to be Orwell to understand that allowing a profit-driven company to analyze your genetic data comes with some scary privacy risks.

The only legislation directly concerning this data is called the Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (also known as GINA), and it has been criticized by privacy experts for its narrow scope.

Privacy policy design can be an ambiguous business even with the best intentions, and I think it would be naive of a consumer to believe that DNA testing companies don’t have an incentive to leverage your data in ways that can’t be foreseen.

Source: How much of your privacy is at stake after using DNA test kits — Quartz

Inherently identifiable: Is it possible to anonymize health and genetic data?

Nearly 25 million people have taken an at-home DNA testing kit and shared that data with one of four ancestry and health databases.

With this proliferation of genetic testing and biometric data collection, there should be an increased scrutiny of the practices used to deidentify this data. Biometric data, namely genetic information and health records, is innately identifiable.

But can biometric data ever truly be anonymized, what are the methods of deidentification and best practices, and the current state of biometric data under the EU General Data Protection Regulation?

Full article: Inherently identifiable: Is it possible to anonymize health and genetic data?

Chinese researchers reveal method to bypass biometric fingerprint scanners in smartphones

Chinese security researchers from X-Lab security at Tencent challenged fingerprint security in a presentation at the GeekPwn 2019 conference in Shanghai, writes Forbes. The team claims it can hack into almost any Android or iOS device in just about 20 minutes by using what appears to be a fairly simple fingerprint hacking method.

Without giving too many details about the actual technical approach to the audience, researchers used a smartphone to take a photo of fingerprints left on a glass and ran the photo through an app they developed. They were then able to gain access into three different phones equipped with different scanning technologies, one each with capacitive, optical, and ultrasonic sensors.

Source: Chinese researchers reveal method to bypass biometric fingerprint scanners in smartphones | Biometric Update

The DNA database used to find the Golden State Killer is a national security leak waiting to happen

A private DNA ancestry database that’s been used by police to catch criminals is a security risk from which a nation-state could steal DNA data on a million Americans, according to security researchers.

Security flaws in the service, called GEDmatch, not only risk exposing people’s genetic health information but could let an adversary such as China or Russia create a powerful biometric database useful for identifying nearly any American from a DNA sample.

Source: The DNA database used to find the Golden State Killer is a national security leak waiting to happen – MIT Technology Review

Sweden authorises the use of facial recognition technology by the police

Sweden’s data protection authority has approved the use of facial recognition technology by the police, to help identify criminal suspects.

According to the Swedish authority, the processing and storage measures comply with Sweden’s Crime Data Act and the EU’s Data Protection Law Enforcement Directive (GDPR).

The decision is controversial following successive bans of this technology in US cities. The technology is widely used in China.

Source: Sweden authorises the use of facial recognition technology by the police | New Europe

Biometric use set to increase with expansion of iris recognition technology

New research points to major developments in global iris recognition, with the market set to grow from this year’s figure of $2.3bn to $4.3bn by 2024.

The upsurge comes as biometrics systems across the world become increasingly relied upon in both private and public sectors.

One of the primary reasons for this rise in demand is the increasing need for surveillance and security, owing to factors such as the rise in terrorist attacks, crime rate, data breaches, and cybercrimes. As iris recognition is one of the most preferred biometric technologies, this factor has also led to the rise in the demand for iris recognition systems.

Source: #Privacy: Biometric use set to increase with expansion of iris recognition technology

Facebook must face $35B facial-recognition lawsuit following court ruling

Facebook’s most recent attempt to extricate itself from a potentially landmark lawsuit has come to a dead end, as a federal court declined to hear another appeal to stop the $35 billion class action.

In San Francisco last week, the US Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit denied Facebook’s petition for an en banc hearing in the case. Usually, appeals cases are heard by a panel of three judges out of all the judges who work in a given circuit. An en banc hearing is a kind of appeal in which a much larger group of judges hears a case. In the 9th Circuit, 11 of the 29 judges sit on en banc cases.

Source: Facebook must face $35B facial-recognition lawsuit following court ruling | Ars Technica

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