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Tag Archives for " biometrics "

How Photos of Your Kids Are Powering Surveillance Technology

One day in 2005, a mother in Evanston, Ill., joined Flickr. She uploaded some pictures of her children. Years later, their faces are in a database that’s used to test and train some of the most sophisticated artificial intelligence systems in the world called MegaFace.

By law, most Americans in the database don’t need to be asked for their permission. However, residents of Illinois are protected by one of the strictest state privacy laws on the books: the Biometric Information Privacy Act, a 2008 measure that imposes financial penalties for using an Illinoisan’s fingerprints or face scans without consent.

Full article: How Photos of Your Kids Are Powering Surveillance Technology – The New York Times

Google Facial Recognition Tactics Raise Racial, Privacy Concerns

In the past, facial recognition technology has notoriously had a harder time identifying people with darker skin. Google wants to avoid that pitfall.

Company is building a massively diverse database, ostensibly so products like the biometric features on its upcoming Pixel 4 smartphone don’t suffer from a racial bias.

The Silicon Valley-based company’s efforts to gather as much facial recognition data as it can — especially from people of color — has raised questions about the tactics it employs to meet that end.

Source: Google Facial Recognition Tactics Raise Racial, Privacy Concerns

French Liberte Tested by Nationwide Facial Recognition ID Plan

France is poised to become the first European country to use facial recognition technology to give citizens a secure digital identity — whether they want it or not.

Saying it wants to make the state more efficient, President Emmanuel Macron’s government is pushing through plans to roll out an ID program, dubbed Alicem, in November, earlier than an initial Christmas target. The country’s data regulator says the program breaches the European rule of consent and a privacy group is challenging it in France’s highest administrative court. It took a hacker just over an hour to break into a “secure” government messaging app this year, raising concerns about the state’s security standards.

Source: French Liberte Tested by Nationwide Facial Recognition ID Plan – Bloomberg

Gatwick Airport commits to facial recognition tech at boarding

Gatwick has become the UK’s first airport to confirm it will use facial-recognition cameras on a permanent basis for ID checks before passengers board planes.

It follows a self-boarding trial carried out in partnership with EasyJet last year.

The London airport said the technology should reduce queuing times but travellers would still need to carry passports.

Source: Gatwick Airport commits to facial recognition tech at boarding – BBC News

Major breach found in biometrics system used by banks, UK police and defence firms

The fingerprints of over 1 million people, as well as facial recognition information, unencrypted usernames and passwords, and personal information of employees, was discovered on a publicly accessible database for a company used by the likes of the UK Metropolitan police, defence contractors and banks.

Suprema is the security company responsible for the web-based Biostar 2 biometrics lock system that allows centralised control for access to secure facilities like warehouses or office buildings. Biostar 2 uses fingerprints and facial recognition as part of its means of identifying people attempting to gain access to buildings.

Recently Biostar 2 platform was integrated into another access control system – AEOS, that is used by 5,700 organisations in 83 countries, including governments, banks and the UK Metropolitan police. In a search last week, the researchers found Biostar 2’s database was unprotected and mostly unencrypted.

Source: Major breach found in biometrics system used by banks, UK police and defence firms | Technology | The Guardian

Google Seeks to Establish Facial Recognition in Homes

With opposition growing to facial recognition, Google has decided instead to build facial recognition into Nest Hub Max, an “always on” device intended for use in the home.

Google’s “face match” constantly targets the facial images of each person in the household. Any interaction with the Google device is added to the secret user profile Google maintains for ad targeting.

Source: Google Seeks to Establish Facial Recognition in Homes

California lawmakers passes ban on facial recognition tech in police body cams

The three-year moratorium prohibits state and local law enforcement from using facial recognition technology.

The bill, AB215, also referred to as the Body Camera Accountability Act got voted by The State Assembly 42-18, and will now head to Governor Gavin Newsom who will decide on signing the bill to law. If he signs, it will go into effect January, 2020.

Source: #privacy: California lawmakers passes ban on facial recognition tech in police body cams

UK Court Dismisses Challenge to Police Use of Facial Recognition Technology

On September 4, 2019, the High Court of England and Wales dismissed a challenge to South Wales Police’s use of Automated Facial Recognition technology. The Court determined that the police’s use of AFR had been necessary and proportionate to achieve their statutory obligations.

The police would subsequently match the images captured with wanted persons in their own databases using biometric data analysis. Where a match was not made with any of these watchlists, the images were immediately and automatically deleted.

Source: High Court Dismisses Challenge to Police Use of Facial Recognition Technology

Amazon testing payment system that uses hands as ID

Forget the titanium Apple Card — Amazon’s latest payment method uses flesh and blood.

The e-tailing giant’s engineers are quietly testing scanners that can identify an individual human hand as a way to ring up a store purchase, with the goal of rolling them out at its Whole Foods supermarket chain in the coming months.

Source: Amazon testing payment system that uses hands as ID

Court of Amsterdam decision demonstrates “threshold for use of fingerprints is high”

The Court of Amsterdam (‘the Court’) issued, on 15 August 2019, its decision on Case 7728204 CV VERZ 19-9686, where it upheld the choice of an employee of Manfield Schoenen BV, a retail company, who refused to provide their fingerprint for a newly introduced system of finger scan authorisation for cash registers.

The Decision highlights that Article 29 of the Act Implementing the GDPR (‘UAVG’) allows the processing of biometric data, such as fingerprints for the purpose of unique identification if the same is a necessity to fulfil authentication or security purposes. In addition, the Decision also notes that the processing of such biometric data is forbidden under Article 9(1) of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Source: Netherlands: Court of Amsterdam decision demonstrates “threshold for use of fingerprints is high”

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