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Tag Archives for " biometrics "

UK Post Office to use biometrics for client identification

The Post Office is rolling-out of a suite of online and in-branch products in a new partnership with digital identity company Yoti. The rollout includes a free-to-use app that will combine customers’ personal data and biometrics to create a secure, reusable ID on their phone.

Companies can use Post Office and Yoti identity verification services for fraud detection, E-signatures and customer authentication services. The technology uses secure biometric face matching and liveness detection.

Source: Post Office partners with Yoti and unveils digital identity services –

Greece Moves Ahead with Biometric Border Management System

Greece is planning to implement a biometric border management system that will record all crossings at ports, airports and border check points.

This means that all ports, airports and border check points in Greece will be equipped with biometric detection systems for facial recognition and fingerprinting.

Information on the movements of third country nationals within the Schengen Area will be collected and stored at Hellenic Police headquarters. Traveler data will be stored for five years and includes names, passport numbers, four fingerprints, and biometric photos

Source: GTP Headlines Greece Moves Ahead with Biometric Border Management System | GTP Headlines

TikTok owner ByteDance to pay US privacy settlement

TikTok’s Chinese parent company ByteDance has agreed to pay 92 million dollars in a settlement to US users who are part of a class-action lawsuit alleging the video-sharing app failed to gain their consent to collect data in violation of a strict Illinois privacy law.

The federal lawsuit alleged TikTok broke the Illinois biometric privacy law, which allows suits against companies that harvest consumer data without consent, including via facial and fingerprint scanning.

Source: TikTok owner ByteDance to pay US privacy settlement – Independent.ie

Fears over DNA privacy as 23andMe goes public in deal with Richard Branson

The genetic testing company 23andMe will go public through a partnership with a firm backed by the billionaire Richard Branson, in a deal that has raised fresh privacy questions about the information of millions of customers.

Launched in 2006, 23andMe sells tests to determine consumers’ genetic ancestry and risk of developing certain illnesses, using saliva samples sent in by mail.

Source: Fears over DNA privacy as 23andMe goes public in deal with Richard Branson

Digital fingerprints on ID cards – no violation of the right to privacy, says Belgian Constitutional Court

On 14 January 2021, the Belgian Constitutional Court delivered a  judgment on the legality of the integration of the digital format of two fingerprints in ID cards, introduced through Article 27 of the Belgian law of 25 November 2018.

After a balancing of interests, the Court ruled that the inclusion of digital fingerprints on ID cards does not violate the fundamental right to respect for private life, thereby providing clarity on a heavily criticized matter and setting an important precedent.

Source: Belgium: Digital fingerprints on ID cards – no violation of the right to privacy according to the Belgian Constitutional Court – Privacy Matters

Huawei worked on several surveillance systems promoted to identify ethnicity

Facing an international outcry over its testing of a “Uighur alarm” system, Huawei said it is committed to human rights “at the highest level.”

But the tech giant has worked with dozens of security contractors to develop surveillance products, some of which were touted as being able to identify a person’s ethnicity or to help suppress potential protests, according to company marketing documents that shed light on a little-publicized corner of one of China’s most valuable tech empires.

Source: ‘Uighur alarm’ wasn’t only Huawei product touted to identify ethnicity – The Washington Post

Researchers Explore Privacy Techniques to Protect Against Re-Identification of Genomic Information

It’s the stuff of science fiction: adversaries extract DNA information from a cup of coffee or postage stamp and use it infer one’s most private traits.

However, a recently released study entitled, “Data Sanitization to Reduce Private Information Leakage from Functional Genomics” discusses how this can be achieved, along with privacy measures that the life sciences and research community can use to help limit the risks to identifiable health information.

Source: Researchers Explore Privacy Techniques to Protect Against Re-Identification of Genomic Information

Why facial recognition thermometers are raising privacy concerns during the pandemic?

Thermal imaging thermometers with facial recognition are popping up during the pandemic. But, privacy concerns have been raised.

The new technology looks like a tablet connected to a stand that scans a person’s temperature from the shoulders up. But, some devices—like ones that were used in schools, according to Wired—also come with facial recognition technology. The facial recognition feature in the temperature checkers are also being used by employers.

Given the privacy concerns that have been raised with facial recognition technology as a whole, experts have raised alarms about its use during the coronavirus pandemic.

Full article: What are Facial Recognition Thermometers and Who’s Using Them?

DHS Plans to Start Collecting Eye Scans and DNA

US Department of Homeland Security is planning to collect unprecedented levels of biometric information from immigration applicants and their sponsors — including U.S. citizens.

While some types of applicants have long been required to submit photographs and fingerprints, a rule currently under consideration would require practically everyone applying for any kind of status, or detained by immigration enforcement agents, to provide iris scans, voiceprints and palmprints, and, in some cases, DNA samples. A tangled web of defense and surveillance contractors, which operate with little public oversight, have already begun to build the infrastructure that would be needed to store these records.

Source: DHS Plans to Start Collecting Eye Scans and DNA

Forensic Genealogy Cracks Cold Cases Amid Privacy Concerns

Millions of people will unwrap at-home ancestry testing kits this holiday season and eagerly swab their cheeks and mail in the saliva, hoping their DNA will unlock clues about their heritage or reveal long-lost relatives.

The tests, which can cost as little as $59, offer entertainment and a chance to uncover family secrets. But with law enforcement increasingly mining the DNA databases to solve cold cases, as in the arrest last week of a Lehigh County man suspected in the 1969 murder of a San Diego woman, experts say consumers should think about their privacy when they hand over their DNA.

Source: Forensic Genealogy Cracks Cold Cases Amid Privacy Concerns | Pennsylvania News | US News

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