fbpx

Download free GDPR compliance checklist!

Tag Archives for " biometrics "

Why your palm could be safer than fingerprints or facial recognition?

Amazon and Apple both have patents for palm scanners and Chinese startups have already started using the tech in locks and vending machines.

Palm recognition systems work by identifying vein patterns and lines and creases on the hand’s surface, ideally using cameras and infrared to avoid contact. Compared with a face, palmprint is not privacy sensitive.

Source: Why your palm could be safer than fingerprints or facial recognition – Amazon and Apple both have patents for palm scanners and Chinese startups have already started using the tech in locks and vending machines | Abacus

Carrefour’s fingerprint payments to be investigated by Belgian privacy agency

The Belgian Data Protection Authority has stated that there is “a good chance” it will investigate Carrefour’s fingerprint payment system.

The supermarket chain announced on Tuesday that it will organise a pilot project allowing clients to pay for their groceries with their fingerprints in a store in the centre of Brussels. The clients will be able to pay by scanning their finger at the cash register, after which the money will disappear from their bank account.

Source: Carrefour’s fingerprint payments to be investigated by Belgian privacy agency

UK looks to replace passwords with biometric technology to reduce NHS login time

The U.K. government is investing £40 million (USD$52 million) in multi-factor authentication technology to upgrade NHS staff computer login system and reduce employee login time, which has reportedly brought great stress and dissatisfaction among staff members.

The system will focus on a partnership with IT system suppliers to replace password logins with biometric multi-factor logins such as fingerprint access, making sure trusts comply and update processes so that staff is granted the access permission needed, and merging local with national system so healthcare facilitators can access all clinical and workforce systems. The upgrade will not only save time logging into different IT systems, but it will also boost infrastructure security.

Source: UK looks to replace passwords with biometric technology to reduce NHS login time | Biometric Update

Study finds consumers would choose biometric authentication over passwords

Passwords are a double-edged sword: they are meant to protect information, but they are also frustrating with so many to remember and manage.

A recent Visa survey showed that 68% of U.S. shoppers have abandoned an online purchase due to forgetting a password, trouble logging in, or issues receiving a one-time passcode.

According to Visa, more than half of credit cardholders who responded to the survey (53%) say they would switch banks if their current doesn’t offer biometric authentication options.

Source: #Privacy: Study finds consumers would choose biometric authentication over passwords

Fight against facial recognition hits wall across the West

The result is an impasse that has left tech companies largely in control of where and how to deploy facial recognition.

One big reason: Western governments are embracing this technology for their own use, valuing security and data collection over privacy and civil liberties.

Full article: Fight against facial recognition hits wall across the West – POLITICO

China Uses DNA to Map Faces, With Help From the West

Beijing’s pursuit of control over a Muslim ethnic group pushes the rules of science and raises questions about consent.

The technology, which is also being developed in the United States and elsewhere, is in the early stages of development and can produce rough pictures good enough only to narrow a manhunt or perhaps eliminate suspects. But in the long term it may even be possible for the government to feed images produced from a DNA sample into the mass surveillance and facial recognition systems that it is building, tightening its grip on society by improving its ability to track dissidents and protesters as well as criminals.

Source: China Uses DNA to Map Faces, With Help From the West – The New York Times

DHS May Require U.S. Citizens Be Photographed at Airports

Federal officials are considering requiring that all travelers — including American citizens — be photographed as they enter or leave the country as part of an identification system using facial-recognition technology.

The Department of Homeland Security says it expects to publish a proposed rule next July. Facial recognition is already being tested by several airlines at a number of U.S. airports.

Source: DHS May Require U.S. Citizens Be Photographed at Airports | Time

Biometric systems to expand in airport security

Biometric Systems segment of the market is anticipated to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period, in terms of the role such technology plays in airport security.

Various airports and airlines are currently testing and using biometrics in the airports to speed up various airport processes like check-in and security check or passport control.

Source: #Privacy: Biometric systems to expand in airport security

DNA test kits threaten kids’ privacy in ways we can’t understand yet

You don’t have to be Orwell to understand that allowing a profit-driven company to analyze your genetic data comes with some scary privacy risks.

The only legislation directly concerning this data is called the Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (also known as GINA), and it has been criticized by privacy experts for its narrow scope.

Privacy policy design can be an ambiguous business even with the best intentions, and I think it would be naive of a consumer to believe that DNA testing companies don’t have an incentive to leverage your data in ways that can’t be foreseen.

Source: How much of your privacy is at stake after using DNA test kits — Quartz

Inherently identifiable: Is it possible to anonymize health and genetic data?

Nearly 25 million people have taken an at-home DNA testing kit and shared that data with one of four ancestry and health databases.

With this proliferation of genetic testing and biometric data collection, there should be an increased scrutiny of the practices used to deidentify this data. Biometric data, namely genetic information and health records, is innately identifiable.

But can biometric data ever truly be anonymized, what are the methods of deidentification and best practices, and the current state of biometric data under the EU General Data Protection Regulation?

Full article: Inherently identifiable: Is it possible to anonymize health and genetic data?

1 2 3 15
>