Tag Archives for " Canada "

Homeless shelter plans to ID clients with facial recognition

Agencies have struggled with how to identify clients that don’t have official ID, and one Calgary shelter thinks it might have a high-tech solution — facial recognition. However, this solution comes with privacy risks.

Read article: Homeless shelter plans to ID clients with facial recognition, but it’s a fix that comes with privacy risks | CBC News

Looking to Canada for input on the GDPR’s data retention requirements

One of the core principles of data processing set forth in Article 5(e) of the EU General Data Protection Regulation is that personal data shall be retained in a form that “permits identification of data subjects for no longer than is necessary for the purposes for which the personal data are processed.” Although this language is not complex, it raises critical questions not answered within the text, namely: What comprises a purpose and how does one determine whether the purpose is resolved?

Read full article: Looking to Canada for input on the GDPR’s data retention requirements

Sidewalk Toronto commits to Privacy by Design principles amid citizen concerns

Members of the Sidewalk Toronto team echoed the principles of Privacy by Design, the framework of Ryerson University’s expert in residence Ann Cavoukian.

The former Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario is an adviser to the project’s privacy policy development as it works through a lengthy public consultation phase for a project that is in many ways the first smart city development of its kind.

Source: Sidewalk Toronto commits to Privacy by Design principles amid citizen concerns | IT World Canada News

A Right to Be Forgotten in Canada?

Should Canada adopt its own version of the “right to be forgotten”? The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) recently concluded, in a Draft Position Paper, that such a right actually exists already.

According to the OPC, Canada’s Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) gives individuals legal power to make search engines like Google de-list search results about them, and to make individual websites take down information.

Source: A Right to Be Forgotten in Canada? | Center for Internet and Society

Privacy experts: GDPR will help consumers indirectly

The European Union’s new privacy protection rules are being described as a game-changing new standard that’s already being felt in Canada as companies with transatlantic operations get ready for the sweeping changes that come into effect later this month.

“The direct effects for Canadian consumers will arise predominantly in their dealings with multinational corporations, the companies that do business across borders,” said University of Ottawa law professor Teresa Scassa.

Source: Privacy experts: EU changes will help consumers indirectly, push Canada to follow | CTV News

A Right to Be Forgotten in Canada?

Should Canada adopt its own version of the “right to be forgotten”? The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) recently concluded, in a Draft Position Paper, that such a right actually exists already.

According to the OPC, Canada’s Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) gives individuals legal power to make search engines like Google de-list search results about them, and to make individual websites take down information.

Source: A Right to Be Forgotten in Canada? | Center for Internet and Society

Canadian Court Re-examines Google Takedown Order In Light of U.S. Ruling

Last year’s Supreme Court of Canada Google v. Equustek case , which upheld a B.C. court’s global takedown order, continues to play out in the courts.

The Supreme Court decision noted that it was open to Google to raise potential conflict of laws with the B.C. court in the hopes of varying the order: If Google has evidence that complying with such an injunction would require it to violate the laws of another jurisdiction, including interfering with freedom of expression, it is always free to apply to the British Columbia courts to vary the interlocutory order accordingly.

Source: Back to B.C.: Court Re-examines Google Takedown Order In Light of U.S. Ruling

Toronto smart city plan faces privacy concerns

Sidewalk Labs, the unit of Google parent Alphabet Inc. selected to help transform a parcel of land known as Quayside, at the foot of Parliament Street, listed off a dizzying array of technologies it could develop in Canada’s largest city, then sell elsewhere: cameras and sensors that detect pedestrians at traffic lights or alert cleanup crews when garbage bins overflow; robotic vehicles that whisk away garbage in underground tunnels; heated bike lanes to melt snow; even a new street layout to accommodate a fleet of self-driving cars.

Many are concerned about the data Sidewalk could collect. Some say the deal has been shrouded in secrecy. Others fear the company’s vague but sweeping plans could threaten the city’s authority over a massive swath of waterfront or even its public transit system and other key services.

Source: Cracks appear in Sidewalk Labs’ Toronto waterfront plan after fanfare – The Globe and Mail

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