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Tag Archives for " Canada "

Quebec Will Force Uber to Share Trip Location Data

Privacy advocates are concerned that the new law can paint an unsettling picture of people’s movements in Quebec.​

A new law that regulates taxis and ridesharing apps in Quebec will require real-time geolocation data, including pick-up/drop-off points and route information, to be shared with municipal governments and approved third parties.

Source: Quebec Will Force Uber to Share Your Trip Location Data – VICE

Canada’s Federal Court sidesteps constitutional questions in Google ‘right to be forgotten’ case

Google LLC was handed a setback this month in a case over the so-called “right to be forgotten” when Canada’s Federal Court adjudicator ruled that it won’t delve into the thorny constitutional questions wrapped up in the matter.

Instead, the Federal Court will judge two specific points related to Canada’s privacy law, in a reference case brought forward by federal privacy commissioner Daniel Therrien.

The right to be forgotten does not currently exist in Canada as it does in Europe, where people can contact search engines and request that links be removed from search results related to a person’s name, if they feel that the information is “inadequate, irrelevant, or no longer relevant.”

Source: Federal Court sidesteps constitutional questions — for now — in Google ‘right to be forgotten’ case | Financial Post

Does Canadian Privacy Law Matter if it Can’t be Enforced?

While the U.S. relies on binding enforcement of privacy policies alongside limited sector-specific rules for children and video rentals, Canada’s private sector privacy law, which applies broadly to all commercial activities, has received the European Union’s stamp of approval, and has a privacy commissioner charged with investigating complaints.

The weakness of Canadian law became evident last week when the federal and British Columbia privacy commissioners released the results of their investigation into Facebook arising from the Cambridge Analytica scandal. After a brief negotiation, the Facebook simply refused to adopt the commissioners’ recommendations.

Full article: Does Canadian Privacy Law Matter if it Can’t be Enforced?

Facebook breached Canada’s privacy law

Canadian regulators on Thursday found that Facebook committed “serious” breaches of local laws over its mishandling of users’ personal information, announcing they would take the company to court to force it to change its privacy practices.

The new legal salvo from Canada comes after federal authorities and provincial regulators in British Columbia determined that Facebook had in place “superficial” protections for users’ data and failed to keep close watch over third-party apps that accessed that information.

Source: Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data breach leads to Canada privacy violation finding – The Washington Post

Companies should get ‘meaningful consent’ for user data, privacy watchdog says

New guidelines come into effect Jan. 1, give guidance for private sector companies’ use of Canadians’ personal information, but no enforcement.

The guidelines make clear that it’s no longer sufficient for companies to simply provide a legal disclaimer — that most users will never read — to obtain consent to collect, use and monetize users’ personal information.

Full article: Companies should get ‘meaningful consent’ for user data, privacy watchdog says | The Star

Privacy concerns rise as Facebook chooses Canada for dating feature launch

Facebook Dating, which was previously piloted in Colombia, operates with users creating profiles that are separate from their Facebook ones and kept out of sight of friends. Facebook Dating’s Canadian roll-out comes as the technology giant is embroiled in privacy concerns following a series of data breaches.

Some experts said the dating offering will raise privacy concerns of its own and is unlikely to assuage worries about the platform – even if Zuckerberg previously claimed “we have designed this with privacy and safety in mind from the beginning.”

Full article: Facebook chooses Canada for dating feature launch, but privacy concerns abound | CTV News

Cisco contradicts Dutton’s claim breaking digital encryption won’t create ‘back doors’

The telecommunications provider Cisco has contradicted Peter Dutton’s claims the government’s new bill to compel tech companies to break digital encryption will not result in “back doors” in their products.

At a committee hearing in Canberra on Friday, witnesses from Cisco, Optus and Telstra called for a better definition of the bill’s main safeguard that tech companies cannot be asked to build “systemic” weaknesses into their products.

Full article: Cisco contradicts Dutton’s claim breaking digital encryption won’t create ‘back doors’ | World news | The Guardian

Tech industry told ‘privacy is not absolute’ and end-to-end encryption ‘should be rare’

An international network of intelligence agencies, so-called Five Eyes nations – the US, UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, in a joint communiqué and statement of principles has told the tech industry that ‘privacy is not an absolute’ and that the use of end-to-end encryption ‘should be rare’.

The statement on privacy contains a veiled threat to tech companies that they may face legislation if they don’t take steps to ensure that they can allow access to ‘appropriate government authorities.’

Source: Tech industry told ‘privacy is not absolute’ and end-to-end encryption ‘should be rare’ | 9to5Mac

Homeless shelter plans to ID clients with facial recognition

Agencies have struggled with how to identify clients that don’t have official ID, and one Calgary shelter thinks it might have a high-tech solution — facial recognition. However, this solution comes with privacy risks.

Read article: Homeless shelter plans to ID clients with facial recognition, but it’s a fix that comes with privacy risks | CBC News

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