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Tag Archives for " Canada "

Class action suit launched against Dell after data breach led to years of scam calls

A proposed class action suit has been launched against Dell Technologies on behalf of thousands of Canadians whose personal information was compromised in a data breach.

According to a claim filed in a Nova Scotia court, the suit’s proposed representative plaintiff is seeking compensation for two years of scam calls and emails he received after a 2017 data breach exposed information about him and more than 7,000 other Dell customers.

Source: Class action suit launched against Dell after data breach led to years of scam calls – National | Globalnews.ca

Canadian privacy watchdog publishes recommendations on regulating use of AI

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (the OPC) yesterday outlined recommendations for regulating the use of artificial intelligence, including a rights-based approach.

The recommendations include creating a right for a meaningful explanation of automated decisions, and a right of subjects to contest these decisions. It also wants to require organisations to design AI systems from their conception in a way that protects privacy. The OPC is also suggesting it receives powers to issue binding orders and financial penalties to ensure compliance.

Source: Canadian privacy watchdog publishes recommendations on regulating use of AI

Canada crawling toward AI regulatory regime, but experts say reform is urgent

Alberta and B.C. privacy commissioners has no authority to levy fines against the any companies that violate Canadians’ personal information, an “incredible shortcoming of Canadian law that should really change,” B.C. information and privacy commissioner Michael McEvoy said in an email.

The revelation shines a light on the legal void around algorithmic technology. Despite its status as an artificial-intelligence hub, Canada has yet to develop a regulatory regime to deal with problems of privacy, discrimination and accountability to which AI systems are prone, prompting renewed calls for regulation from experts and businesses.

Source: Canada crawling toward AI regulatory regime, but experts say reform is urgent | The Star

Border officer provides device passwords to police

A Canadian border officer who dealt with Meng Wanzhou at Vancouver’s airport in the hours before her arrest said he made an “embarrassing” and “heart-wrenching” mistake, when his handwritten note with the passwords of Meng’s electronic devices ended up in police hands, breaching privacy laws.

Meng’s lawyers say it was part of a covert plot by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), to gather evidence for the American FBI.

Source: Canada border officer says giving police Meng Wanzhou’s device passwords was ‘embarrassing, heart-wrenching’ blunder

Real estate company collected 5 million shoppers’ images

Cadillac Fairview – one of North America’s largest commercial real estate companies – embedded cameras inside their digital information kiosks at 12 shopping malls across Canada and used facial recognition technology without their customers’ knowledge or consent, an investigation by the federal, Alberta and BC Privacy Commissioners has found.

The goal, the company said, was to analyze the age and gender of shoppers and not to identify individuals. Cadillac Fairview also asserted that shoppers were made aware of the activity via decals it had placed on shopping mall entry doors that referred to their privacy policy – a measure the Commissioners determined was insufficient.

Source: News release: Cadillac Fairview collected 5 million shoppers’ images – Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada

Canadian class-action suit against Facebook alleges misuse of personal information

Two Facebook users are seeking damages on behalf of hundreds of thousands of Canadians whose personal data may have been improperly used for political purposes.

The proposed class-action lawsuit filed by Calgary residents Saul Benary and Karma Holoboff asks the Federal Court to order the social-media giant to bolster its security practices to better protect sensitive information and comply with federal privacy law.

It also seeks $1,000 for each of the approximately 622,000 Canadians whose information was shared with others through a digital app.

Source: Canadian class-action suit against Facebook alleges misuse of personal information | CTV News

Five Eyes governments, India, and Japan make new call for encryption backdoors

Members of the intelligence-sharing alliance Five Eyes, along with government representatives for Japan and India, have published a statement over the weekend calling on tech companies to come up with a solution for law enforcement to access end-to-end encrypted communications.

The statement is the alliance’s latest effort to get tech companies to agree to encryption backdoors.

The Five Eyes alliance, comprised of the US, the UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, have made similar calls to tech giants in 2018 and 2019, respectively.

Source: Five Eyes governments, India, and Japan make new call for encryption backdoors | ZDNet

Privacy, effectiveness among concerns of robocall-blocking apps

If you’re one of many Canadians who’ve considered alternative measures to block robocalls to your smartphone, a consumer agency says you should be aware of the dangers.

Whether or not the apps are effective is another matter, as most services won’t be able to completely block out the calls. Other features that some apps offer, such as answering calls with nonsensical messages, may actually result in a number getting more scam calls than before.

There is also the concern that a blocking app may expose your personal information, especially when it comes to those that require access to your voicemail.

Source: Better Business Bureau says there are better ways to block auto-dialers than using an app | CTV News

Canada Admits COVID-19 Contact Tracing App Does Not Guarantee 100% Anonymity

Canada’s privacy regulator is admitting the government’s contract tracing app can’t provide a 100% guarantee of anonymity.

“True anonymity, technically speaking, would require the complete and permanent impossibility of reversing the data processes at play, which could reveal sources of personal information and so re-identify individuals,” says Vito Pilieci, spokesman for Canada Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien.

“Our understanding of the situation is that while the identification of users would be highly improbable, it would not be impossible.”

Source: Canada Admits COVID-19 Contact Tracing App Does Not Guarantee 100% Anonymity

Canada’s Supreme Court upholds Genetic Non-Discrimination Act

On July 10, Canada’s Supreme Court issued its Reference re Genetic Non‑Discrimination Act decision, surprising many by upholding the Genetic Non-Discrimination Act’s constitutionality in a 5–4 decision.

The GINA decision of the Supreme Court itself lends support to Canadian claims that privacy is important and fundamental to Canadian law and adds a significant “plus” on our privacy ledger.

Source: Canada’s Supreme Court upholds Genetic Non-Discrimination Act

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