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Tag Archives for " CCPA "

Class action filed against Zoom about data collection

Wexler Wallace LLP had filed a class action lawsuit against Zoom Video Communications, Inc. before the U.S. Court for the Northern District of California, for allegedly collecting the personal information of its users and disclosing such information to third parties, including Facebook, Inc.

This data transfer occurs when a Zoom user installs, opens or closes the popular Zoom iOS video conferencing application. Consumers are not meaningfully informed of these facts, and specifically that Facebook receives the data. As the complaint alleges, even information on non-Facebook users is sent to Facebook through Zoom’s video conferencing application.

Source: Zoom Privacy Lawsuit – Wexler Wallace LLP

California Attorney General Issues Second Round of Modifications to CCPA Regulations

On March 11, 2020, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced a second round of modifications to the draft regulations his office is preparing for the California Consumer Privacy Act (the “Draft CCPA Regulations”).

These modifications update the initial draft regulations published on October 11, 2019 as well as the first set of modified draft regulations published on February 10, 2020 (as we previously covered here and here). The second set of modifications contain a small number of impactful changes.

Source: Second Modified CCPA Draft Regulations Released

Like CCPA, But Make it Virginia: States Scramble to Introduce Data Privacy Legislation of Their Own

With companies still scrambling to comply with the newly effective California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), other states continue to introduce data privacy legislation of their own.

Virginia added itself to the ever-growing list of states considering such bills when the Virginia Privacy Act (VPA) was introduced to the General Assembly for consideration January 8. The VPA combines the CCPA’s notice requirements with consumer rights similar to those found in the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Source: Like CCPA, But Make it Virginia: States Scramble to Introduce Data Privacy Legislation of Their Own | News & Knowledge | Adams and Reese LLP

What we’ve learned from California’s Consumer Privacy Act so far

Though CCPA went into force Jan.1, some of the law’s implications are already becoming clear.

First, privacy is not cheap. CCPA delegates rule-making authority (as well as enforcement) to the California Department of Justice.

The second lesson is that privacy laws are prolix. CCPA runs about 10,000 words. That virtually demands that businesses retain dedicated CCPA specialists to advise them — their own readings and the advice of non-specialist lawyers won’t cut it.

Finally, state heterogeneity in privacy law is now inevitable. Some states introduced their own clone-and-revise versions of CCPA in 2019, but none passed. A number of state legislatures will likely restart the CCPA clone-and-revise process in 2020.

Full article: What we’ve learned from California’s Consumer Privacy Act so far | TheHill

EU Parliament debates if California could be considered ‘adequate’

Members of the Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs discussed in depth the European Commission’s report, issued Oct. 21, with representatives of the European Commission and European Data Protection Board.

Referring to the California Consumer Privacy Act, which took effect Jan. 1, Bruno Gencarelli, the commission’s head of International Data Flows and Protection Unit, said many of those who worked on the EU General Data Protection Regulation and Law Enforcement Directive “would not even have imagined a few years ago that there would be serious discussion in Congress about a federal privacy legislation or that California would have strong privacy rules that have just entered into application.”

Source: EU Parliament debates: Could California be considered ‘adequate’ on its own?

Ten Questions—And Answers—About the California Consumer Privacy Act

You may have heard from a lot of businesses telling you that they’ve updated their privacy policies because of a new law called the California Consumer Privacy Act. But what’s actually changed for you?

EFF has spent the past year defending this law in the California legislature, but we realize that not everyone has been following it as closely as we have.

Read full article: Ten Questions—And Answers—About the California Consumer Privacy Act

Why a Steak in California Comes With a Privacy Notice

Under California’s new privacy law, even brick and mortar companies have to make it clear you can opt out of having your personal data sold.

That applies not just to giants like Facebook, but to real world establishments lik efast food restaurants.

Full article: Why a Steak in California Comes With a Privacy Notice – VICE

Most companies not yet compliant with CCPA

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) became effective on January 1, 2020, but according to major news sources most companies are not yet compliant or prepared for the impact CCPA will have.

The use of third-party data is threatened by the CCPA as it will greatly affect what data can be used for targeting purposes. This means first-party data still reigns supreme and for brands, managing customer relationships is more important now than ever before.

Source: #Privacy: Most companies not yet compliant with CCPA

Data privacy predictions for 2020: Six industry experts have their say

The issue of data privacy has risen dramatically over the past few years, from a fringe concept to a major regulatory concern, particularly with the creation of GDPR. But what predictions do experts have for data privacy in 2020?

Read predictions experts across technology made for 2020, from new regulations to emerging business practices shaping data privacy: Data privacy predictions for 2020: Six industry experts have their say

California Will Be Key Battleground in Tech Privacy Fight in 2020

On Jan. 1, the law—the California Consumer Privacy Act—officially took effect. But that is hardly the end of it. The legislation could very well be back on the ballot in the state in 2020, an illustration of how little has been settled when it comes to rules about privacy, either in California or nationally.

Many privacy advocates remain skeptical of the prospects for a federal privacy law. With Congress stalled, other states may also press ahead with their own laws.

Full article: California Will Be Key Battleground in Tech Privacy Fight in 2020 – Bloomberg

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