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Tag Archives for " CCTV "

German DPA fines company 10.4 million euros for monitoring employees without legal basis

The State Commissioner for Data Protection (LfD) Lower Saxony has imposed a fine of 10.4 million euros on notebooksbilliger.de AG. The company had video-monitored its employees for at least two years without any legal basis.

The illegal cameras recorded workplaces, sales rooms, warehouses and common areas, among other things. The company claimed that the aim of the installed video cameras was to prevent and investigate criminal offenses and to track the flow of goods in the warehouses. In order to prevent theft, a company must first examine milder means (e.g. random bag checks when leaving the business premises). Video surveillance to uncover criminal offenses is also only lawful if there is justified suspicion against specific persons.

Source: LfD Niedersachsen imposes a fine of 10.4 million euros on notebooksbilliger.de | The State Commissioner for Data Protection Lower Saxony

Varanasi Is Using Crime Control as an Excuse for Facial Recognition Surveillance

Varanasi in India is installing 3,000 CCTV cameras with automated facial recognition tech at the city’s crossings.

Authorities say the sole purpose of these cameras is to advance security measures and track suspected criminals. The project will connect all the police stations in the city to this CCTV network, with 500 kilometres of optical fibre being laid at 700 points in the city. This advanced technology is meant to help identify people by matching their digital images, photos and video feed with the existing database.

Source: Varanasi Is Using Crime Control as an Excuse for Facial Recognition Surveillance

Leaks and lawsuits blight Russia facial recognition

The rise of cloud computing and AI technologies have popularised the technology globally, with supporters saying it promises greater security and efficiency.

With more than 105,000 cameras, Moscow boasts one of the world’s most comprehensive surveillance systems. It became fully operational this year and authorities say it has cut crime and helped the city enforce coronavirus lockdown restrictions.

But the backlash is growing, too, as critics say benefits come at the cost of lost privacy and increased surveillance. The rights activists say cameras have been used to monitor political rallies and a lack of clear rules allows for abuse.

Full article: Leaks and lawsuits blight Russia facial recognition

Surveillance Startup Used Own Cameras to Harass Coworkers

Verkada, a fast-growing Silicon Valley surveillance startup, equips its offices in downtown San Mateo, California, with its own state-of-the-art security cameras.

Last year, a sales director on the company’s sales team abused their access to these cameras to take and post photos of colleagues in a Slack channel where they made sexually explicit jokes about women who worked at the company.

Source: Surveillance Startup Used Own Cameras to Harass Coworkers

Doorbell Cameras Help to Spy on Police

Two leaked documents show how a monitoring tool used by police has been turned against them.

The rise of the internet-connected home security camera has generally been a boon to police, as owners of these devices can (and frequently do) share footage with cops at the touch of a button. But according to a leaked FBI bulletin, law enforcement has discovered an ironic downside to ubiquitous privatized surveillance: The cameras are alerting residents when police show up to conduct searches.

Source: Doorbell Cameras Like Ring Give Early Warning of Police Searches, FBI Warned

Lincolnshire Police to trial new CCTV tech that can tell if you’re in a mood

New facial-recognition technology enabling people’s moods to be picked up by CCTV is set to be trialled by Lincolnshire Police.

Officers will be able to enter searches for people wearing hats and glasses – and can even find those showing a certain mood or expression.

Source: Lincolnshire Police to trial new CCTV tech that can tell if you’re in a mood – Lincolnshire Live

A New Map Shows the Inescapable Creep of Surveillance

The Atlas of Surveillance shows which tech law enforcement agencies across the country have acquired. It’s a sobering look at the present-day panopticon.

A collaboration between the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the University of Nevada, Reno, Reynolds School of Journalism, the Atlas of Surveillance offers an omnibus look not only at what technologies law enforcement agencies deploy, but where they do it.

Source: A New Map Shows the Inescapable Creep of Surveillance | WIRED

Glasses Equipped With Facial Recognition Are Coming

New York-based Vuzix is selling augmented reality headsets to identify suspects.

In February, Gizmodo reported that Vuzix was working with Clearview AI to bring its billion-person facial recognition to Vuzix’s AR glasses. (Clearview said at the time that the app was just a prototype.)

Vuzix also recently announced that it was working with a company called TensorMark to bring facial recognition to the company’s headsets. Vuzix is pitching its product as a solution not just for security, but also border patrol, first responders, retail, hospitality, and banking.

Facial recognition in an AR headset raises all the same issues as the technology when deployed in CCTV cameras, including privacy and accuracy. But the small form factor also begs new questions, like what shortcuts might have been taken to run facial recognition algorithms on smaller, weaker computing chips? Do matches get double-checked by anyone?

Source: Glasses Equipped With Facial Recognition Are Coming

Some shirts hide you from cameras—but will anyone wear them?

It’s theoretically possible to become invisible to cameras. But can it catch on?

The idea of using the “ugly shirt” to render oneself invisible to cameras has been a part of science fiction for a decade or more. But today, there are indeed computer scientists and artists working to make invisibility as simple as a shirt or a scarf… in theory, at least.

Full article: Some shirts hide you from cameras—but will anyone wear them? | Ars Technica

Body temperature cameras fuse security with virus screening technology

Cybersecurity and visuals tech company, Platinum CCTV, has unveiled a new thermoptic cybersecurity camera designed to help screen individuals before they enter a facility, to guard against cyber threats and the spread of infectious diseases.

The PT-BF5421-T Thermal/Visible Hybrid IP Security Camera is the next generation in business cybersecurity, providing accurate body temperature readings of plus/minus 0.3 degrees Celsius, while alerting staff to institute facility protocols when needed. Each thermal image is clearly seen and read up to three meters away, with both visible and audible signals sent whenever a high body temperature is detected.

Source: #Privacy: Body temperature cameras fuse security with virus screening technology – PrivSec Report

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