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Tag Archives for " China "

Russia’s surveillance state still doesn’t match China. But Putin is racing to catch up.

China leads the world in rolling out a vast network of facial recognition technology, including a system to track and repress its Uyghur minority. But Putin’s Russia is racing to catch up.

Russian authorities are ramping up the use of facial recognition technology to track opposition protesters to their homes and arrest them — a powerful new Kremlin tool to crush opposition.

And the system is so leaky that surveillance data on individuals can be bought for a small sum on Russia’s notorious black market in data, along with all kinds of other personal information. There is even a name for the clandestine cyber bazaar: probiv.

Full article: Russia is growing its surveillance state but not everyone is monitored equally – The Washington Post

Chinese Hackers Selling Intimate Stolen Camera Footage

Stolen videos captured by tens of thousands of security cameras at private properties throughout China are now for sale across social media, marketed as sex tapes.

In just one 20-day period in February, the Post reported that one seller shared 8,000 videos in one group chat. The members of this chat group were VIPs, the Post added, who would then turn around and sell those videos to others.

Source: Chinese Hackers Selling Intimate Stolen Camera Footage | Threatpost

China found using surveillance firms to help write ethnic-tracking specs

China enlisted surveillance firms to help draw up standards for mass facial recognition systems, researchers said, warning that an unusually heavy emphasis on tracking characteristics such as ethnicity created wide scope for abuse.

The technical standards, published by surveillance research group IPVM, specify how data captured by facial recognition cameras across China should be segmented by dozens of characteristics – from eyebrow size to skin color and ethnicity.

The standards are driving the way surveillance networks are being built across the country – from residential developments in the capital, Beijing, to police systems in the central province of Hubei.

Source: China found using surveillance firms to help write ethnic-tracking specs | Reuters

Elon Musk Says Tesla Won’t Share Data From Its Cars With China or U.S.

Tesla would never provide the U.S. government with data collected by its vehicles in China or other countries, Elon Musk, the company’s chief executive, told a high-level conference in China Saturday.

Musk’s assurance that Chinese customer data is fully protected followed the Chinese government’s decision to restrict the use of Tesla cars by military personnel or employees of key state-owned companies, as first reported by the Journal on Friday. Beijing had acted out of concern that sensitive data such as images taken by the cars’ cameras could be sent to the U.S., according to people familiar with the matter.

Source: Elon Musk Says Tesla Won’t Share Data From Its Cars With China or U.S. – WSJ

China Introduces Comprehensive New E-Commerce Rules

Operators of e-commerce platforms, websites and apps in China, and those using third party e-commerce, social media or livestreaming platforms to sell their products and services in China, must update their operations, services and systems in advance of wide-ranging new rules.

The Measures for the Supervision and Administration of Online Transactions  will come into force on 1 May 2021. The Measures provide detailed guidance supplementing the PRC E-Commerce Law, the PRC Consumer Protection Law and the PRC Cybersecurity Law.

Source: CHINA: Navigating China Episode 15: Comprehensive New E-Commerce Rules Introduced – Privacy Matters

TikTok wants to keep tracking iPhone users with state-backed workaround

Some of China’s biggest technology companies, including ByteDance and Tencent, are testing a tool to bypass Apple’s new privacy rules and continue tracking iPhone users without their consent to serve them targeted mobile advertisements.

Apple is expected in the coming weeks to roll out changes it announced last June to iPhones that it says will give users more privacy. Until now, apps have been able to rely on Apple’s IDFA system to see who clicks on ads and which apps are downloaded.

In response, the state-backed China Advertising Association has launched a new way to track and identify iPhone users called CAID, which is being widely tested by tech companies and advertisers in the country.

Source: TikTok wants to keep tracking iPhone users with state-backed workaround | Ars Technica

Microsoft email server flaws exploited to hack at least 30,000 US organizations

The Chinese state-sponsored group dubbed Hafnium ramped up and automated its campaign after the patch was released. In the US, the group infiltrated at least 30,000 organizations using Exchange to process email, including police departments, hospitals, local governments, banks, credit unions, non—profits and telecommunications providers.

Worldwide, the number of victims is reportedly in the hundreds of thousands. A former national security official Wired talked to said thousands of servers are getting compromised per hour around the world.

When Microsoft announced its emergency patch, it credited security firm Volexity for notifying it about Hafnium’s activities. Volexity president Steven Adair now said that even organizations that patched their servers on the day Microsoft’s security update was released may have still been compromised.

Source: Microsoft email server flaws exploited to hack at least 30,000 US organizations | Engadget

How to Use Clubhouse Without Giving Up Your Data

The buzzy social-networking app Clubhouse has been scrambling in recent weeks to respond to concerns from privacy and security experts about how the service collects and safeguards user data.

You don’t have to give Clubhouse access to every single contact in your phone to use the app, but doing so is the only way you can invite other users to Clubhouse. If you’ve already shared your contacts, the Clubhouse spokesperson says you can revoke access to the list using the settings app on your iPhone and contact Clubhouse support to delete all previous data.

But that doesn’t stop other users from uploading your phone number along with their contact lists—and that’s become a sore spot for people who don’t even use the app.

Clubhouse had turned on geofencing to limit users to servers in specific regions—excluding mainland China, for example. It also took steps to enable encryption that would limit Agora’s access to raw audio data. But Agora currently still has access to metadata, raw audio data, and the encryption keys.

However, security and privacy experts doesn’t recommend using Clubhouse for sensitive conversations, particularly if you’re concerned about information landing in the hands of the Chinese government.

Source: How to Use Clubhouse Without Giving Up Your Data – Consumer Reports

China Has Stolen 80% Of American Adults’ Personal Data, Expert Claims

Bill Evanina, former director of the US National Counterintelligence and Security Center, appeared as a guest on CBS’s 60 Minutes on Sunday, January 31, and gave a stark warning about data being used by China. During the programme, the former director suggested that Beijing is attempting to collect the medical data of Americans.

Evanina went on to claim that 80% of Americans had their data stolen by China. Evanina explained that Chinese company BGI Group had offered to build state of the art testing facilities in America, which caused concern as Evanina began to question the motives of the firm.

Source: China Has Stolen 80% Of American Adults’ Personal Data, Expert Claims – UNILAD

California WeChat Users Sue Tencent Over Fear of Chinese Censors

A group of California WeChat users sued Tencent Holdings Ltd., the Chinese owner of the messaging and payment app, for allegedly violating their right to privacy by surveilling and censoring their communications.

Citizen Power Initiatives for China, a group promoting transition to Democracy in China, and six anonymous WeChat users said comments made using WeChat that can be perceived as critical of the Chinese government have led to the users’ accounts being frozen, causing them to be cut of from friends and relatives in China as well as their business clients in the U.S.

Source: California WeChat Users Sue Tencent Over Fear of Chinese Censors – Bloomberg

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