Tag Archives for " consent "

noyb.eu filed complaints against Google, Instagram, WhatsApp and Facebook

One the first day of GDPR noyb.eu has filed four complaints against Google (Android), Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram over “forced consent”.

Very similar complaints were field with four authorities, to enable European coordination. In addition to the four authorities at the residence of the users, the Irish Data Protection Commissioner will probably get involved in the cases too, as the headquarter of the relevant companies is in Ireland in three cases.

Source: noyb.eu – My Privacy is none of your Business

Most GDPR emails unnecessary and some illegal

Many firms have the required consent already; others don’t have consent to send a request. However, vast majority of emails flooding inboxes across Europe from companies asking for consent to keep recipients on their mailing list are unnecessary and some may be illegal, privacy experts have said.

Source: Most GDPR emails unnecessary and some illegal, say experts | Technology | The Guardian

Privacy: A Quick Overview for App Designers

Privacy by design and by default is something that all developers will have learn. Here are some basic points app designers should know and take into consideration:

  • Privacy isn’t scary: it’s an opportunity to earn people’s trust.
  • This is about how we handle personal data.
  • Some data are sensitive, and we need explicit consent before collecting them.
  • System permissions for apps are not the same as explicit consent.
  • Everyone is entitled to certain privacy rights: to be informed (Notice), to see the data we collect (Access), to take their data elsewhere (Portability), and to have their data corrected or deleted (Right to Be Forgotten).
  • Here are some design patterns we can use to respect people’s privacy in our mobile apps.

Source: Privacy: A Quick Overview for App Designers – Prototypr

IAB releases Transparency & Consent Framework

IAB Europe and IAB Technology Laboratory on April 24 released the market-ready technical specifications for the Transparency & Consent Framework following a 30-day public consultation in March and April 2018.

The official release version of the standard reflects extensive feedback from publishers, agencies, and ad tech companies collected during the consultation period. As with all standards, it is expected that this standard will be iterated with new features and attributes in the future.

Source: IAB Europe and IAB Tech Lab Release Cross-Industry Transparency & Consent Framework For Adoption

Is GDPR recharging cookie notice popups?

Will soon all websites greet users with interrupting and blocking pop-ups requiring to read a consent form and click “I agree” – prior to allowing the actual using of a website? Will we all be expected click in tons ? Let’s look at the worst scenario , and how we may be arriving there.

European regulations mandate that most sites need to inform their users if user data is processed. In most commonly understood and practical terms this means that websites need to seek consent prior to setting browser cookies. This requirement is de facto universal in European Union and allows “doing something” about consent for data processing.

Source: Is GDPR recharging cookie notice popups?

How One Location-Based Data Firm Is Preparing for GDPR

Mobile location firms that collect latitude and longitude stats have been particularly scrutinized because the data is considered personal under GDPR, requiring that consumers consent to providing companies with their information—which could potentially creep consumers out if they know their location is being mined for advertising.

Los Angeles location firm Factual is aiming to mitigate GDPR’s risks by scraping all of its data collected on European citizens. It will then get to work rebuilding its database by asking for consumers’ “explicit consent.” The company’s contracts now also require that partners have obtained data explicitly.

Source: How One Location-Based Data Firm Is Preparing for GDPR – Adweek

DPO Confessional: Think globally, but direct market locally

Applying the consent basis to data processing has territorial implications. Unfortunately, the EU’€™s General Data Protection Regulation contains some ambiguity regarding the proper basis to choose for the purposes of direct marketing -€” the two leading options seem to be legitimate interest or consent. One must look not only to the law but also to custom and practice in each region of interest.

Source: DPO Confessional: Think globally, but direct market locally

Consumer groups file FTC complaint against YouTube for collecting kids’ personal data without parental consent

A coalition of 23 consumer groups filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission charging YouTube with violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) by collecting personal data on children without parental consent. YouTube is owned by Google.

The complaint was co-filed Monday by the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood (CCFC) and the Center for Digital Democracy.

Source: Consumer groups file FTC complaint against YouTube for collecting kids’ personal data without parental consent – Marketing Land

On the perils of ‘consent’ when it comes to collecting children’s data

Special events involving children are often highly sought after by children and their parents alike.

Especially those that involve going through an assessment process to be selected for something as prestigious as: national science fairs, debate contests, math competitions, coding conferences or programs taught at prestigious schools and universities.

Source: On the perils of ‘consent’ when it comes to collecting children’s data

Zuckerberg Hits Users with the Hard Truth: You Agreed to This

After another privacy bombshell, Facebook tells horrified users, “it’s explained right there in the app.”

In its current iteration, Facebook’s Messenger application requests that those who download it give it permission to access incoming and outgoing call and text logs.

Source: Zuckerberg Hits Users with the Hard Truth: You Agreed to This | Vanity Fair

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