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Tag Archives for " cookies "

Google challenges French data watchdog’s €100 million fine in court

France’s administrative court known as the Council of State considered on Thursday an application for interim measures filed by Google LLC and Google Ireland after the French Data Protection Authority known as the CNIL fined the digital giant €100 million last December for its cookie collection policy.

In its deliberation of 7 December 2020, the French data protection authority (CNIL) accused the US giant, whose European headquarters are based in Dublin, of contravening the law on information technology, files, and freedoms.

For its part, Google has appealed to the one-stop-shop mechanism provided for in the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which, in its view, requires it to report on data protection matters only to the corresponding authority in the country in which it is based, namely Ireland.

Source: Google challenges French data watchdog’s €100 million fine in court – EURACTIV.com

Google Explores Alternative to Apple’s New Anti-Tracking Feature

Google is exploring an alternative to Apple Inc.’s new anti-tracking feature, the latest sign that the internet industry is slowly embracing user privacy, according to people with knowledge of the matter.

Internally, the search giant is discussing how it can limit data collection and cross-app tracking on the Android operating system in a way that is less stringent than Apple’s solution, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing private plans.

Google is trying to balance the rising demands of privacy-conscious consumers with the financial needs of developers and advertisers. The Alphabet Inc. unit is seeking input from these stakeholders, similar to how it’s slowly developing a new privacy standard for web browsing called the Privacy Sandbox.

Source: Google Explores Alternative to Apple’s New Anti-Tracking Feature – Bloomberg

CNIL Calls Organizations to Audit their Sites and Apps for Cookie Compliance

French Data Protection Authority (CNIL) announced that it sent letters and emails to approximately 300 organizations, both private and public, to remind them of the new cookie law rules and the need to audit sites and apps to comply with those rules by March 31, 2021.

On October 1, 2020, the CNIL published a revised version of its guidelines on cookies and similar technologies, its final recommendations on the practical modalities for obtaining users’ consent to store or read non-essential cookies and similar technologies on their devices and a set of questions and answers regarding the Recommendations. The CNIL decided to allow for a transition period of six months to comply with the Guidelines (i.e., until March 31, 2021), and announced that it will carry out inspections to enforce the Guidelines after that transition period.

Source: CNIL Calls Organizations to Audit their Sites and Apps for Cookie Compliance

Germany Publishes New Draft Rules for Cookies and Similar Technologies

On January 12, 2021, the German Ministry for the Economy and Energy released a new draft Law on Data Protection and the Protection of Privacy in Telecommunications and Telemedia (TTDSG).

If enacted, the draft law will replace the existing data protection and privacy provisions of Germany’s Telemedia Act and Telecommunications Act (Telemedia Act), including provisions applicable to the use of cookies and similar technologies.

Among other things, the draft law clarifies that a website operator must obtain an end-user’s consent for deploying cookies and similar technologies on the end-user’s device(s), unless the cookies or similar technologies in question are “necessary to provide the service(s) requested by the end user” (Section 22). Moreover, the draft law expressly states that such consent must meet the standards of the GDPR.

Source: Germany Publishes New Draft Rules for Cookies and Similar Technologies | Inside Privacy

Google eyes privacy-friendly substitute to cookies

Google on Monday said new test results show promising signs that the technology it’s hoping will replace cookie-based ad targeting is working.

Google has been testing a new API (a software interface) called Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) that acts as an effective replacement signal for third-party cookies. The API exists as a browser extension within Google Chrome.

Google has other proposals to replace cookies in the works, so it’s not guaranteed that FLoC will be the answer, but the company said it’s highly encouraged by what it has seen so far.

Source: Google eyes privacy-friendly substitute to cookies – Axios

UK Case Tests the Territorial Application of the GDPR to U.S. Run Website

The recent UK case of Soriano v Forensic News and Others tested the territorial reach of the General Data Protection Regulation and represents the first UK judgment dealing with the territorial scope of the GDPR. Mr. Soriano argued that because the Forensic News site used cookies for targeted online advertising, it had engaged in monitoring of people in the EU, and thus the GDPR’s territorial scope test was met.

Court held that the use of cookies for behavioral advertising purposes was not “related to” Mr. Soriano’s real complaint. In its judgement, the Court stated that, “the Defendant’s journalistic activities have been advanced not through any deployment of these cookies.” However, he was given permission to serve proceedings outside of the UK in respect of the misuse of private information claim (for the photos only) and the defamation claim.

Source: UK Case Tests the Territorial Application of the GDPR to U.S. Run Website | Privacy & Information Security Law Blog

An EU parliament website for COVID testing allegedly broke the EU’s privacy laws

The European Parliament is being investigated by the European Data Protection Supervisor after allegations that its COVID testing website didn’t meet EU privacy standards.

The website was set up to help MEPs schedule COVID tests, and while it didn’t handle any health information itself, sending data to the US for processing would still be illegal. According to the complaint, the testing website made over 150 requests to third parties, including Google and Stripe. Under EU law, data can only be transferred to the US if “an adequate level of protection for the personal data [can] be ensured,” and noyb argues that the companies “clearly fall under relevant US surveillance laws that allow [targeting of] EU citizens.”

The complaint also alleges that the cookie banners on the site didn’t disclose all of the cookies that would be stored on the user’s computer, and that the banners prodded users toward the “Accept All” button. Since cookies are used to track users across websites, and some of the ones found were from the aforementioned US companies, it’s understandable that EU regulators might be caught off guard.

Source: An EU parliament website for COVID testing allegedly broke the EU’s privacy laws – The Verge

Comscore To Intro Cookie-Less Targeting Solution

Comscore announced that it will launch a cookie-free audience targeting solution sometime during the first quarter.

Called Predictive Audiences, the solution uses “privacy-friendly” contextual signals to target audiences across digital, mobile and connected TV based on age and gender, TV viewership, OTT consumption, and consumer behaviors such as automotive purchase data, location data and non-Fair Credit Reporting Act financial data, according to the company.

Source: Comscore To Intro Cookie-Less Targeting Solution 01/12/2021

Advertisers scramble to plan for the uncertain ‘cookieless future’

It’s hard to be sure of any potential outcome when there are so many question marks over what comes after third-party cookies.

With so much up in the air right now, advertisers are focused on what they do know — Google will remove cookies from its dominant browser sometime next year bar a major u-turn. Whatever advertisers’ beliefs are about how the industry has responded to this deadline, they’re slowly waking up to the idea that the answer — or at least part of it — rests on their ownership of first-party data in the absence of third-party data they’d usually get from cookies.

Full article: Advertisers scramble to plan for the uncertain ‘cookieless future’ | Digiday

Firefox to ship ‘network partitioning’ as a new anti-tracking defense

Firefox 85, scheduled to be released next month, in January 2021, will ship with a feature named Network Partitioning as a new form of anti-tracking protection.

The feature is based on “Client-Side Storage Partitioning,” a new standard currently being developed by the World Wide Web Consortium’s Privacy Community Group. Network Partitioning will allow Firefox to save resources like the cache, favicons, CSS files, images, and more, on a per-website basis, rather than together, in the same pool.

Source: Firefox to ship ‘network partitioning’ as a new anti-tracking defense | ZDNet

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