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Tag Archives for " cookies "

Most EU cookie ‘consent’ notices are meaningless or manipulative

New research into how European consumers interact with the cookie consent mechanisms which have proliferated since a major update to the bloc’s online privacy rules last year casts an unflattering light on widespread manipulation of a system that’s supposed to protect consumer rights.

The study, which looked at how consumers interact with different designs of cookie pop-ups and how various design choices can nudge and influence people’s privacy choices, also suggests consumers are suffering a degree of confusion about how cookies function, as well as being generally mistrustful of the term ‘cookie’ itself.

The researchers conclude that if consent to drop cookies was being collected in a way that’s compliant with the EU’s existing privacy laws only a tiny fraction of consumers would agree to be tracked.

Source: Most EU cookie ‘consent’ notices are meaningless or manipulative, study finds | TechCrunch

Publishers v. Privacy: Registration Is Coming

The introduction of ad blocking, browser-level advertising and browser-blocking of tracking and cookies should have heralded the beginning of more anonymous browsing.

Instead, these innovations may lead to more user registration and tracking, albeit in a potentially more consent-based manner. Publishers will soon be waging a greater battle with privacy to build a sustainable ad-supported business, writes, Ka Mo Lau, COO of Thunder Experience Cloud.

Full article: Publishers v. Privacy – Registration Is Coming | MarTech Advisor

Cookies and other tracking devices: the CNIL publishes new guidelines

Without waiting for the future ePrivacy regulation, which is currently under discussion at the European level and which is not likely to come into force in the short term, the CNIL has decided to update its reference framework. In particular, it was necessary to repeal the 2013 recommendation, which was not compatible with the new provisions of the GDPR.

Full article: Cookies and other tracking devices: the CNIL publishes new guidelines

The Washington Post is preparing for post-cookie ad targeting

The Washington Post has internally developed a first-party data ad targeting tool called Zeus Insights, which offers contextual targeting capabilities.

The Zeus platform monitors contextual data such as what article a person is reading or watching, what position they have scrolled to on a page, what URL they have used to arrive there and what they’re clicking on. The publisher will then match that data to its existing audience data pools, which it has accumulated over the last four years, to create assumptions on what that news user’s consumption intent will be. The technology uses machine learning to decipher the patterns.

Full article: The Washington Post is preparing for post-cookie ad targeting – Digiday

Google Chrome’s Incognito Mode is way less private than you think

Google Chrome 76 is limiting how you can be tracked in its Incognito Mode. But that doesn’t mean you’re not being tracked at all.

Despite the long-known fact that Incognito isn’t truly anonymous, new research has re-emphasised that Google and other web browsers are still tracking you in privacy mode, even on the most sensitive of sites.

Full article: Google Chrome’s Incognito Mode is way less private than you think | WIRED UK

Cookie consent – What “good” compliance looks like according to the ICO

On 3 July 2019, the UK data protection authority (the ICO) updated its guidance on the rules that apply to the use of cookies and other similar technologies.

The ICO has also changed the cookie control mechanism on its own website to mirror the changes in the new guidance.

Full article: Cookie consent – What “good” compliance looks like according to the ICO

ICO admits its own cookie policy is non-compliant with GDPR

The Information Commissioners Office has admitted that its current consent notice relating to the use of cookies on devices failed “to meet the required GDPR standard”.

The issue relates to the automatic placing of cookies on a user’s mobile device when accessing the ICO’s website, which one complaint argued was in breach of the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003, which sits alongside GDPR.

Source: ICO admits its own cookie policy is non-compliant with GDPR | IT PRO

Dutch DPA Issues Opinion on Use of Cookie Walls

Recently, the Dutch Data protection Authority has taken the position that the use of so-called “cookie walls,” whereby website access is made conditional upon the provision of consent to tracking cookies, is not compliant with the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

According to the Dutch SA, use of online tracking technology is one of the most invasive data processing activities considering that virtually everyone is active on the internet and therefore potentially subject to online tracking. It is therefore key to obtain valid consent from website users before engaging in any tracking activity. nd such consent shall meet GDPR requirements.

Source: Dutch Supervisory Authority Opines on Use of Cookie Walls

Reported Google browser change could be final death blow to cookies

Google is planning to announce new tools for Chrome that offer users more control over third party tracking cookies. The controls and default settings would be somewhat less “severe” than the anti-cookie tracking moves made by Safari and Firefox, which adopted default tracking protection.

Chrome has a 63% market share globally and a 50% share in the U.S. Depending on what Google announces it could be the nail in the cookie coffin — not unlike how Apple killed Flash. Marketers have been anticipating the end of cookies for some time.

Full article: Reported Google browser change could be final death blow to cookies – Marketing Land

Privacy UX: Better Cookie Consent Experiences

With the advent of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May 2018, the web has turned into a vast exhibition of consent pop-ups, notifications, toolbars, and modals.

While the intent of most cookie-related prompts is the same — to get a user’s consent to keep collecting and evaluating their behavior the same ol’ way they’ve been doing for years — implementations differ significantly, often making it ridiculously difficult or simply impossible for customers to opt out from tracking.

Full article: Privacy UX: Better Cookie Consent Experiences

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