Tag Archives for " data transfer "

GDPR: Opportunities and challenges

The main challenge of GDPR for corporations will be assessing their current information collection and storage systems against the new regulations and ensuring compliance before the deadline. Accountability is critical, and concepts such as pseudonymisation will become commonplace under the new regulations.

In addition, the cross-border transfer of EU residents’ data outside the region will be become much harder. The EU Commission will assess third countries’ level of protection by carrying out “adequacy” assessments binding to all member states. They will then carry out reviews every four years to ensure continued compliance.

Source: Countdown to GDPR: Part 2 — Opportunities and challenges

Arron Banks, the insurers and my strange data trail

Carole Cadwalladr just wanted to insure her car. Six months later, she found a mass of personal details held by a firm she had never contacted that is run by Leave.EU’s biggest donor, Arron Banks. How did it get there?

Source: Arron Banks, the insurers and my strange data trail | Technology | The Guardian

With GDPR in the Background, Digital Protectionism Is on the Rise

A protectionist mindset that’s been brewing politically worldwide for quite some time is suddenly at the doorstep of every digital platform and global brand. Marketing players are now making locally-minded data moves that stand to hurt companies of all types; though the business ramifications have yet to be appropriately recognized.

Certain governments already have data localization laws in place. Russia, for example, enforces data localization laws so that citizens’ datasets have to remain in the country. Enforcing its laws, Russia has banned access to LinkedIn since 2016 and threatens to block Facebook in 2018 unless it agrees to comply with the data localization laws.

Source: With GDPR in the Background, Digital Protectionism Is on the Rise – Adweek

A Tale of Two Poorly Designed Cross-Border Data Access Regimes

On Tuesday, the European Commission published two legislative proposals that could further cement an unfortunate trend towards privacy erosion in cross-border state investigati­ons.

Building on a foundation first established by the recently enacted U.S. CLOUD Act , these proposals compel tech companies and service providers to ignore critical privacy obligations in order to facilitate easy access when facing data requests from foreign governments.

Source: A Tale of Two Poorly Designed Cross-Border Data Access Regimes

Cloud data privacy for businesses unclear after Supreme Court drops Microsoft case

The case led to the CLOUD Act, which requires tech companies comply with court orders for data stored in the US and overseas.

After the passage of the CLOUD Act, the federal government attained a new warrant, which replaced the original warrant served on Microsoft in 2013. The court concluded Tuesday that there is no longer a “live dispute” between the US and Microsoft based on the legal changes, and directed the district court to dismiss the case.

Source: Cloud data privacy for businesses unclear after Supreme Court drops Microsoft case – TechRepublic

The 11 key considerations in Schrems II, in laymen’s terms

The lengthy Schrems II case decided by the Irish High Court in October 2017 left open which questions would be referred to the Court of Justice of the European Union.

Those 11 questions have now been published by the court, with a slight possibility of revision after reviewing further submissions by defendant Facebook.

Source: The 11 key considerations in Schrems II, in laymen’s terms

Is California on its way to going for ‘adequacy?’

EU cross-border transfers of personal data are highly regulated. Existing restrictions are designed to ensure that the level of protection of personal data is not undermined by exporting data.

A heavy compliance burden is imposed on U.S. entities that import EU personal data because the U.S. regulatory data protection framework differs from the EU framework in ways that, from an EU perspective, undermine the effective protection of EU data if exported.

Source: Is California on its way to going for ‘adequacy?’

U.S. Department of Commerce Posts Update of Actions to Support the Privacy Shield Frameworks

On March 26, 2018, the U.S. Department of Commerce posted an update on the actions it has taken between January 2017 and March 2018 to support the EU-U.S. and Swiss-U.S. Privacy Shield Frameworks.

The update details measures taken in support of commercial and national security issues relating to the Privacy Shield.

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce Posts Update of Actions to Support the Privacy Shield Frameworks

Advertising Association calls for ‘deep alignment’ of European data protection post-Brexit

The Advertising Association has unfurled its colours to the mast of continued ‘deep alignment’ between the UK and Europe on data protection once Britain departs the continental club.

In a statement the AA called on the European Commission to “secure a new and positive relationship between the EU and UK following Brexit that will recognise the UK’s deep alignment with the EU on data protection policy”.

Source: Advertising Association calls for ‘deep alignment’ of European data protection post-Brexit | The Drum

Furor erupts around Indian PM Modi’s app over alleged data sharing

Allegations that Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s official mobile application was sending personal user data to a third party without their consent caused a furor on social media in India and drew criticism from the leader of the main opposition party on Sunday.

Modi’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party denied here the allegations and said the data was being used only for analytics to offer all users the “most contextual content”.

Source: Furor erupts around Indian PM Modi’s app over alleged data sharing

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