Tag Archives for " data "

Blockchain: Practical use cases for the privacy pro – Learning from Estonia

Many Americans would not be able to point out Estonia on a map, yet, the tiny country has become a technological powerhouse and is the headquarters for NATO’€™s Cyber Defense Centre.

Estonia was also the first country to vote online (in 2005) and almost all Estonians can now file taxes online within minutes. Now the Estonian government is heavily turning to blockchain technology to further advance its digital government services and provide citizens with greater control over their personal data. According to Former Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves, “€œEstonia is now a blockchain nation.”

Source: Blockchain: Practical use cases for the privacy pro – Learning from Estonia

Is GDPR recharging cookie notice popups?

Will soon all websites greet users with interrupting and blocking pop-ups requiring to read a consent form and click “I agree” – prior to allowing the actual using of a website? Will we all be expected click in tons ? Let’s look at the worst scenario , and how we may be arriving there.

European regulations mandate that most sites need to inform their users if user data is processed. In most commonly understood and practical terms this means that websites need to seek consent prior to setting browser cookies. This requirement is de facto universal in European Union and allows “doing something” about consent for data processing.

Source: Is GDPR recharging cookie notice popups?

Think globally, but direct market locally

Article 6 of the GDPR requires data controllers to have a lawful basis for data processing.

Anyone following the IAPP Privacy List knows that one of the hottest debates raging is whether direct marketing communications can rely on a “legitimate interest” basis or must be based on explicit consent.

Source: DPO Confessional: Think globally, but direct market locally

New Zealand police eyeing up newer, smarter CCTV facial recognition technology

Cops look to upgrade their CCTV surveillance technology, sparking calls for a privacy debate.

With a network of CCTV cameras across the country, it would give criminals fewer places to hide. Also in the high-tech system would be suspects, prisoners, firearms licence details, missing people and those on the child sex offender register.

Source: Police eyeing up newer, smarter CCTV facial recognition technology | Stuff.co.nz

EU proposes shorter deadlines for cross-border handover of communications evidence

The European Commission has proposed new rules aimed at making it quicker and easier for law enforcement officials to gain access to communications in another EU state.

Under the proposal, communication service providers would be required to respond within 10 days to a request for evidence, or six hours in the event of an emergency. That compares to 120 days under the current European Investigation Order.

Source: EU proposes shorter deadlines for cross-border handover of communications evidence – Telecompaper

How firms you have never interacted with can target your Facebook

Advertisers are seemingly able to access accounts with no input from the user.

On one of Facebook’s myriad setting screens, a place where few dare tread, is a list of places you’ve probably never heard of, all of whom insist that they know you. It’s emblematic of the data protection issues Facebook is struggling to address in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, of the fact that these problems spread far beyond Facebook, and of the easy solutions the company could take if only it had the courage.

Source: How firms you have never interacted with can target your Facebook | Technology | The Guardian

Arron Banks, the insurers and my strange data trail

Carole Cadwalladr just wanted to insure her car. Six months later, she found a mass of personal details held by a firm she had never contacted that is run by Leave.EU’s biggest donor, Arron Banks. How did it get there?

Source: Arron Banks, the insurers and my strange data trail | Technology | The Guardian

Facebook’s Blow To Third-Party Data Makes First-Party Data Even More Crucial

Facebook’s move to shut down its Partner Categories program helps it look good in the court of public opinion, shores up some loose ends with respect to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and possibly drives more profitability for the business as it removes partners that were sharing in the ad buy dollars.

Will the sunsetting of the Partner Categories program be a game-changer for companies that have long relied on a combination of first-party and third-party data to make their advertising more effective?

Source: Facebook’s Blow To Third-Party Data Makes First-Party Data Even More Crucial | AdExchanger

Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent Crime

Citizens may object to their social media mining by law enforcement, but the practice can keep the public safe.

Police departments should continue to monitor social media to inform law enforcement. After all, social media sites are full of data that can make police interventions more effective, from posts about crimes in progress to damning evidence offered freely by criminals and even live videos of crimes. However, in designing these initiatives, police departments need to pay closer attention to the Constitution as well as the needs of citizens.

Source: Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent Crime | WIRED

EU Commission proposes making fingerprints mandatory in ID cards

Identity cards held by EU citizens will be required to include digital images of the holder’s fingerprints as part of a crackdown on fraudulent documents used by criminals and extremists, the European Commission has proposed.

In a proposal likely to make waves in countries such as Germany, whose history has made data privacy a guarded asset, the Commission wants to do away with paper-based identity documents that are easy to falsify and can be used to enter the bloc from non-EU countries.

Source: EU Commission proposes making fingerprints mandatory in ID cards

1 2 3 92
>