fbpx

Free tools and resources for Data Protection Officers!

Tag Archives for " data "

Alexa users can now disable human review of voice recordings

Amazon has given Alexa users the option to disable human review of their voice recordings, and committed to greater clarity about its use of the strategy in future, but says it will not follow Google and Apple in halting the practice altogether in Europe.

Echo owners, and other users of the company’s virtual voice assistant, can turn off human review in the Alexa privacy page by disabling a setting labelled “help improve Amazon services and develop new features”.

Source: Alexa users can now disable human review of voice recordings | Technology | The Guardian

FBI proposal outlines plans for large-scale collection of social media data

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is planning to step up its efforts to monitor social media platforms more aggressively in order to detect potential threats.

The law enforcement agency is said to be seeking technological solutions from third-party contractors that would make it possible to harvest publicly-available information en masse from Facebook, Twitter, and other social media platforms.

Source: FBI proposal outlines plans for large-scale collection of social media data

Facebook is Opening Privacy Check-Up Cafes

In an attempt to convince its two billion users that it truly cares about their privacy, Facebook is opening a number of pop-up privacy check-up cafes.

At the five Facebook cafes, visitors will get free drinks and a tutorial on how to customize their privacy settings — something you’d normally have to pay people to do in their spare time.

Source: Facebook is Opening Privacy Check-Up Cafes, for Some Reason

Instagram data privacy enabled location tracking of millions of users

Instagram allowed a trusted advertising partner to harvest huge swathes of user data to create detailed files on account holders’ physical locations and personal bios, news reports reveal.

The information was put together by Hyp3r, in contradiction of Instagram rules and without the popular photo-imagery app’s knowledge. This week, Facebook-owned Instagram instructed Hyp3r to stop the practice, confirming that it was in violation of data privacy rules.

Source: Instagram data privacy enabled location tracking of millions of users – PrivSec Report

Google Hit With New Privacy Suit Over Voice Recordings

A group of California residents has sued Google over allegations that the tech giant violates state law by recording their conversations without consent.

Their complaint comes several weeks after the Dutch radio broadcaster VRT reported Google Home smart speakers and Google Assistant were transmitting consumers’ conversations to Google, even when people hadn’t first given the “Hey, Google,” or “OK, Google,” commands.

Three Illinois residents alleged in a complaint filed in Cook County, Illinois Circuit Court that Google’s collection and retention of voiceprints violates a state biometric privacy law.

Source: Google Hit With New Privacy Suit Over Voice Recordings 07/30/2019

Apple contractors ‘regularly hear confidential details’ on Siri recordings

Apple contractors regularly hear confidential medical information, drug deals, and recordings of couples having sex, as part of their job providing quality control, or “grading”, the company’s Siri voice assistant.

Although Apple does not explicitly disclose it in its consumer-facing privacy documentation, a small proportion of Siri recordings are passed on to contractors working for the company around the world.

Source: Apple contractors ‘regularly hear confidential details’ on Siri recordings

China camera apps may open up user data to Beijing government requests

In the wake of growing global concerns over internet privacy and security protection, cybersecurity experts say Chinese companies cannot deny the government if asked for data.

China’s mobile programs count hundreds of millions of active users, but their capacity to ensure privacy remains a matter of debate — especially since there’s less of an emphasis on that factor at home.

Source: China camera apps may open up user data to Beijing government requests

Google to pay $13 million over Street View data collection

Google has agreed to pay a $13 million settlement that could resolve a class-action lawsuit over the company’s collection of people’s private information through its Street View project.

The agreement, if approved by a judge, would resolve a 2010 suit over the Street View program’s privacy violations, ending nearly a decade of legal challenges related to the issue. The legal action began when several people whose data was collected sued Google after it admitted the cars photographing neighborhoods for Street View had also gathered emails, passwords and other private information from wifi networks in more than 30 countries.

Source: Google privacy lawsuit: Tech giant to pay $13 million over Street View data collection – CNN

‘Anonymised’ data can never be totally anonymous

An anonymised dataset is supposed to have had all personally identifiable information removed from it, while retaining a core of useful information for researchers to operate on without fear of invading privacy.

But in practice, data can be deanonymised in a number of ways. Now researchers have built a model to estimate how easy it would be to deanonymise any arbitrary dataset. A dataset with 15 demographic attributes, for instance, “would render 99.98% of people in Massachusetts unique”. And for smaller populations, it gets easier: if town-level location data is included, for instance, “it would not take much to reidentify people living in Harwich Port, Massachusetts, a city of fewer than 2,000 inhabitants”.

Source: ‘Anonymised’ data can never be totally anonymous, says study | Technology | The Guardian

European Data Protection Board Issues Opinion on U.S. CLOUD Act

On July 10, 2019, the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) and the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) issued a joint assessment of the impact of the U.S. Clarifying Overseas Use of Data Act (CLOUD Act) on the legal framework for the protection of personal data in the EU.

The institutions note that the extraterritorial effect of the CLOUD Act could result in service providers being “susceptible to facing a conflict of laws between US law and the GDPR and other applicable EU or national law of the Member States.”

Source: European Data Protection Board Issues Opinion on U.S. CLOUD Act

1 2 3 133
>