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Tag Archives for " data "

Belgium regulator fights Facebook over user tracking

A court in Belgium has instructed Facebook to put a halt to tracking users without obtaining the proper consents.

The social network has also been told to erase all information it has gathered on individuals who do not have Facebook accounts, after the Brussels Court of First Instance deemed that the company had harvested data illegally.

Source: Belgium regulator fights Facebook over user tracking

Autonomous cars rise privacy questions

When fully autonomous vehicles begin circulating on public roads they will have to be able to detect when people enter or exit a vehicle, who the person is, whether they have left anything behind in the car, and especially if a person has become disabled (because of intoxication or a medical emergency).

And that information will inevitably be shared online, although there may be ways that some people can still preserve their sense of independence in the car.

“In the future, it may be different for people who own their own cars, where there’s more privacy,” said Mr. Wisselmann at BMW, “and for people who use robo taxis, where there will be less.”

Full article: Eyes on the Road! (Your Car Is Watching) – The New York Times

Facebook to Fight Belgian Ban on Tracking

Facebook is attacking a Belgian court order forcing it to stop tracking local users’ surfing habits, including those of millions who aren’t signed up to the social network.

The U.S. tech giant will come face to face with the Belgian data protection authority in a Brussels appeals court for a two-day hearing starting on Wednesday. The company will challenge the 2018 court order and the threat of a daily fine of 250,000 euros ($281,625) should it fail to comply.

Source: Facebook Attack of Belgian Case on Web Tracking Gets Hearing – Bloomberg

61% of CIOs say employees are maliciously leaking data

A study of the root causes of insider breaches has found that 61% of IT leaders believe that employees have maliciously risked data in the last 12 months.

However, the research, which involved input from more than 250 US and UK IT leaders and 2,000 US and UK-based employees, found that employees had a very different view of the situation.

92% of employees said they had not accidentally leaked company data, while 91% said they had not done so intentionally. This suggests that employees may be unaware of being the perpetrators of insider breaches.

Source: Insider breaches: 61% of CIOs say employees are maliciously leaking data

Uber faces fresh legal challenge over driver data

Uber drivers in the U.K. are filing a lawsuit against the company over allegations the firm has continuously broken European data protection laws.

Four drivers are taking legal action against the ride-hailing giant, claiming the company is “failing to honour its obligations” under the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) legislation.

Source: Uber faces fresh legal challenge over driver data

With facial recognition, shoplifting may get you banned in places you’ve never been

There are hundreds of stores using facial recognition – none that have any rules or standards to prevent abuse.

With facial recognition, getting caught in one store could mean a digital record of your face is shared across the country. Stores are already using the technology for security purposes and can share that data – meaning that if one store considers you a threat, every business in that network could come to the same conclusion. One mistake could mean never being able to shop again.

Full article: With facial recognition, shoplifting may get you banned in places you’ve never been – CNET

MoviePass founder wants to use facial recognition to score you free movies

PreShow is developing an app to earn you free movie tickets – to any film in any theater – if you watch 15 to 20 minutes of high-end advertising.

But PreShow hinges on what some may consider a cost and others consider a bargain: facial recognition. PreShow’s app will only unlock with your phone’s facial recognition technology. And while you’re watching the ads to earn that free ticket, your phone’s camera monitors your level of attention. Walk away or even obscure part of your face? The ad will pause after five seconds.

Source: MoviePass founder wants to use facial recognition to score you free movies – CNET

Netherlands wants easier sharing of info about criminals

It has to become easier to share information about criminals, regardless of strict privacy rules, Minister Ferdinand Grapperhaus of Justice and Security said to the Telegraaf in an interview.

The Minister said that he will present a proposal to make the sharing of information about criminals and criminal activity a bit easier. While calling for a more intensified approach to drug trafficking earlier this week, Mayor Aboutaleb noted how difficult it is to share information about suspected criminals with other municipalities.

Source: Sharing info about criminals must be easier, Justice Min. says | NL Times

Personal health information has a value on the black market

Thieves collect personal data such as home addresses and contact information, but also details of physical or mental conditions and prescribed medications. Individuals can be threatened with public exposure of their data, especially those in high-profile positions, and future health benefit claims or even border crossings could be affected.

Compromised personal health data has a much greater and lasting impact. When a credit card is stolen, card numbers are changed and charges in question are typically reimbursed. Conversely, your health record stays with you for life, leaving you more vulnerable to future problems.

Full article: Michael Green: Personal health information has a value on the black market | Vancouver Sun

DNA Testing Company Will Allow Customers to Opt Out of sharing data with FBI

FamilyTreeDNA drew heat from privacy advocates after it was revealed that the company let the FBI access its database.

The decision exposes the ethical and legal conundrums surrounding at-home DNA testing and illustrates the tension between protecting users’ privacy and aiding law enforcement in catching violent criminals. Law enforcement has increasingly been using genealogy to solve crimes.

Source: DNA Testing Company Will Allow Customers to Opt Out of Helping FBI Amid Privacy Concerns

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