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Tag Archives for " data "

Facebook launches app that will pay users for their data

A new Facebook app will allow users to sell the company data on how they use competitors’ apps.

Facebook announced Tuesday that it is recruiting participants to download its new app Study from the Google Play store. Once it is downloaded, it will transmit data with Facebook on what other apps the users have, what features they use, and how much time is spent on them.

New app comes months after Apple cracked down on Facebook for similar apps that paid users for extensive data on phone usage.

Source: Facebook launches app that will pay users for their data | Technology | The Guardian

Hackers are stealing personal medical data to impersonate your doctor

While personally identifiable information — full names, social security numbers, home addresses, dates of birth, credit card numbers — can be exploited by criminals to commit identity fraud, the theft of medical information can have equally serious impact on victims.

How hackers exploit medical data? Administrative paperwork — like medical licenses — to forge a doctor’s identity sells on the dark web for around $500.  Insurance provider’s login information can be used to steal victim’s identity to claim insurance. Forging health insurance cards, prescriptions, and drug labels with an intention to carry drugs through the airport. Using hacked personal health information against individuals who have health issues for extortion and other crimes.

Source: Hackers are stealing personal medical data to impersonate your doctor

One Year Into GDPR, Most Apps Still Harvest Data Without Permission

Unauthorized data harvesting from mobile apps has continued nearly unabated in the year since Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation came into force last May.

In a recent test conducted for AdExchanger, mobile analytics company Kochava examined the behavior of the top 2,700 apps in the Google Play store in the United States compared with France, where GDPR applies.

Source: One Year Into GDPR, Most Apps Still Harvest Data Without Permission | AdExchanger

Amazon now lets you tell Alexa to delete your voice recordings

You’ll now be able to say, “Alexa, delete everything I said today.”

Amazon stores recordings of every request you’ve made to an Alexa device (theoretically, to help improve the voice recognition service and other features). Despite this being largely unnecessary, Amazon doesn’t provide a way to disable the long-term storage of voice recordings or have them deleted on a regular basis.

Full article: Amazon now lets you tell Alexa to delete your voice recordings – The Verge

Don’t Acquire a Company Until You Evaluate Its Data Security

When Marriott International acquired Starwood in 2016 for $13.6 billion, neither company was awareof a cyber-attack on Starwood’s reservation system that dated back to 2014. The breach, which exposed the sensitive personal data of nearly 500 million Starwood customers.

In M&A activity, a target’s quality may be linked to the strength of its cybersecurity and its compliance with data privacy regulation. Therefore, due diligence on data and privacy practices is strongly advised.

Full article: Don’t Acquire a Company Until You Evaluate Its Data Security

ICO’s draft Age Appropriate Design Code could seriously impact child data processing

On 15 April 2019, the ICO opened a public consultation on a draft code of practice titled Age Appropriate Design. The Code will remain open for public consultation until 31 May 2019.

The consultation document is described as a “code of practice for online services likely to be accessed by children.” However, its potential impact is in fact wider, and is perhaps better described as applying to all online services that are not demonstrably unlikely to be accessed by children, which it controversially defines as individuals under 18.

Full article: ICO’s draft Age Appropriate Design Code could seriously impact processing of under 18’s personal data

Coming to store shelves: cameras that guess your age and sex

Eyeing that can of soda in the supermarket cooler? Or maybe you’re craving a pint of ice cream? A camera could be watching you.

But it’s not there to see if you’re stealing. These cameras want to get to know you and what you’re buying.

It’s a new technology being trotted out to retailers, where cameras try to guess your age, gender or mood as you walk by. The intent is to use the information to show you targeted real-time ads on in-store video screens.

Full article: Coming to store shelves: cameras that guess your age and sex

Why Your Used Devices Can Still Affect Your GDPR Compliance

Businesses generally handle compliance well for devices that are still in use, but when replaced, it can be easy to overlook the secure erasure of data stored on the device. This can potentially catch companies out.

It is easy to forget about old devices. When supplying a new phone or laptop, the priority is to get the new device working well rather than worrying about what happens to the old ones. This could be a bottom drawer, or an old cupboard, both common graveyards for forgotten devices, where they collect dust, until sent to the local dump sometime later.

Full article: Why Your Used Devices Can Still Affect Your GDPR Compliance

Tracking Phones, Google Is a Dragnet for the Police

The tech giant records people’s locations worldwide. Now, investigators are using it to find suspects and witnesses near crimes, running the risk of snaring the innocent.

The warrants, which draw on an enormous Google database employees call Sensorvault, turn the business of tracking cellphone users’ locations into a digital dragnet for law enforcement. In an era of ubiquitous data gathering by tech companies, it is just the latest example of how personal information — where you go, who your friends are, what you read, eat and watch, and when you do it — is being used for purposes many people never expected.

Source: Tracking Phones, Google Is a Dragnet for the Police – The New York Times

Facebook exploit user data to remain top dog

Documents uncovered by NBC news indicate that Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, has been exploiting user data as a means to gain leverage over rivals.

These documents include emails, web chats, presentations, spreadsheets and meeting summaries, revealing how Zuckerberg had planned to utilise the data despite insisting that governments need to do more to protect user’s data at the beginning of the month.

Source: Facebook exploit user data to remain top dog

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