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Tag Archives for " encryption "

Europol and the European Commission inaugurate new decryption platform

Europol has launched an innovative decryption platform, developed in close cooperation with the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre. It will significantly increase Europol’s capability to decrypt information lawfully obtained in criminal investigations.

The launch of the new decryption platform marks a milestone in the fight against organised crime and terrorism in Europe. In full respect of fundamental rights and without limiting or weakening encryption, this initiative will be available to national law enforcement authorities of all Member States to help keep societies and citizens safe and secure.

Source: Europol and the European Commission inaugurate new decryption platform to tackle the challenge of encrypted material for law enforcement investigations | Europol

Court orders encrypted email biz Tutanota to build a backdoor in user’s mailbox

Tutanota has been served with a court order to backdoor its encrypted email service – a situation founder Matthias Pfau described to The Register as “absurd.”

Court in Germany last month ordered Tutanota to help investigators monitor the contents of a user’s encrypted mailbox. The site has until the end of the year to add functionality to perform this surveillance.

Source: Court orders encrypted email biz Tutanota to build a backdoor in user’s mailbox, founder says ‘this is absurd’ • The Register

Google is adding end-to-end encryption to its Android Messages app

“We recognize that your conversations are private,” says Google.

Google is upping the security for at least some of the conversations on its Messages app by adding end-to-end encryption.

It will be rolling out end-to-end encryption on Messages, starting with one-on-one conversations between people using the Rich Communication Services-based version of the app.

Source: Google is adding end-to-end encryption to its Android Messages app | ZDNet

Rights Activists Slam EU Plan for Access to Encrypted Chats

Digital rights campaigners on Monday criticized a proposal by European Union governments that calls for communications companies to provide authorities with access to encrypted messages.

“Anyone who finds an open back door into my house can enter it, the same is true for back doors in software,” German Left party lawmaker Domscheit-Berg said. “The proposed EU regulation is an attack on the integrity of digital infrastructure and therefore very dangerous.”

Source: Rights Activists Slam EU Plan for Access to Encrypted Chats | SecurityWeek.Com

EU inches closer to ban on end-to-end encryption

The Council of the European Union appears to have a near-completed resolution that would propose a ban on the use of end-to-end encryption on off-the-shelf apps such as WhatsApp and Signal, according to a leaked document.

The memo, dated 6 November and addressed to representatives from EU member states, reveals that strong encryption remains a priority for lawmakers but that the availability of end-to-end encryption has made it overly difficult for law enforcement to conduct investigations.

Source: EU inches closer to ban on end-to-end encryption | IT PRO

Zoom lied to users about end-to-end encryption for years, FTC says

Zoom has agreed to upgrade its security practices in a tentative settlement with the Federal Trade Commission, which alleges that Zoom lied to users for years by claiming it offered end-to-end encryption.

The FTC complaint says that Zoom claimed it offers end-to-end encryption in its June 2016 and July 2017 HIPAA compliance guides, which were intended for health-care industry users of the video conferencing service. Zoom also claimed it offered end-to-end encryption in a January 2019 white paper, in an April 2017 blog post, and in direct responses to inquiries from customers and potential customers, the complaint said.

Source: Zoom lied to users about end-to-end encryption for years, FTC says | Ars Technica

The Police Can Probably Break Into Your Phone

At least 2,000 law enforcement agencies have tools to get into encrypted smartphones, according to new research, and they are using them far more than previously known.

At least 49 of the 50 largest U.S. police departments have the tools, according to the records, as do the police and sheriffs in small towns and counties across the country. And local law enforcement agencies that don’t have such tools can often send a locked phone to a state or federal crime lab that does.

With more tools in their arsenal, the authorities have used them in an increasing range of cases, from homicides and rapes to drugs and shoplifting, according to the records.

Source: The Police Can Probably Break Into Your Phone – The New York Times

Five Eyes governments, India, and Japan make new call for encryption backdoors

Members of the intelligence-sharing alliance Five Eyes, along with government representatives for Japan and India, have published a statement over the weekend calling on tech companies to come up with a solution for law enforcement to access end-to-end encrypted communications.

The statement is the alliance’s latest effort to get tech companies to agree to encryption backdoors.

The Five Eyes alliance, comprised of the US, the UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, have made similar calls to tech giants in 2018 and 2019, respectively.

Source: Five Eyes governments, India, and Japan make new call for encryption backdoors | ZDNet

The EU’s Timetable for Dismantling End-to-End Encryption

Lobbying of “lawful access” to end-to-end encrypted services has moved from the U.S. to the European Union—where advocates for anti-encryption laws hope to have a smoother ride.

The public signs of this shift in the EU—which until now has been largely supportive toward privacy-protecting technologies like end-to-end encryption—began in June with a speech by Ylva Johansson, the EU’s Commissioner for Home Affairs.

Source: Orders from the Top: The EU’s Timetable for Dismantling End-to-End Encryption

European Police Malware Could Harvest GPS, Messages, Passwords, More

The malware that French law enforcement deployed en masse onto Encrochat devices, a large encrypted phone network using Android phones, had the capability to harvest “all data stored within the device,” and was expected to include chat messages, geolocation data, usernames, passwords, and more.

As well as the geolocation, chat messages, and passwords, the law enforcement malware also told infected Encrochat devices to provide a list of WiFi access points near the device.

Organized crime groups across Europe and the rest of the world heavily used the network before its seizure, in many cases to facilitate large scale drug trafficking.

Source: European Police Malware Could Harvest GPS, Messages, Passwords, More

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