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Tag Archives for " ePrivacy "

Consent remains major ePrivacy sticking point for EU bodies

Consent has become one of the biggest questions surrounding where the ePrivacy Regulation winds up. Commission and Parliament believe consent is the only lawful way to process personal communications, largely leaving out legitimate interest. Should the Commission and Parliament get their way, and consent becomes the only way to process electronic communications data, a lot of companies will be in a tough spot.

Full article: Consent remains major ePrivacy sticking point for EU bodies

Power sector ‘concerned’ about new EU data privacy rules

A proposed ePrivacy regulation currently under discussion at EU level would hurt new business models in the clean energy sector, which are “almost all” based on the collection and treatment of data by home equipment and smart meters, warns an industry coalition. Under the proposed rules, consumers would need to give their prior consent to companies processing energy data from equipment installed in people’s homes and revoke it at any moment, without advance notice.

Full article: Power sector ‘concerned’ about new EU data privacy rules – EURACTIV.com

What is the future of ePrivacy regulation?

ePrivacy’s advancement has been slower than initially promised by policymakers. Member state delegations had raised questions involving the scope of ePrivacy and its position vis-à-vis the GDPR, the fundamental rights of confidentiality with respect to data protection, GPS location data, and developments in artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, and automated driving.

Full article: Can Austria align ‘diverging views’ with proposed ePrivacy amendments?

ePrivacy rapporteur furious over Austria’s limited ambition

The European Parliament’s lead rapporteur on the ePrivacy Regulation has responded with fury to the news that the Austrian presidency of the Council of the EU intends to produce no more than a status update on the law’s progress by the end of the year.

Source: ePrivacy rapporteur furious over Austria’s limited ambition

Browser setting rules could be dropped from new ePrivacy Regulation

Plans to force web browser providers to ask users to set their privacy preferences could be scrapped, according to ePrivacy Regulation proposals under consideration by EU law makers as they have raised a lot of concerns. Such requirement would create burden for browsers and apps, the competition aspect, the link to fines for non-compliance but also the impact on end-users and the ability of this provision to address e.g. the issue of consent fatigue.

Source: Browser setting rules could be dropped from new e-Privacy Regulation

Cookie Consent Is the New Panic

Judging by the number of calls and the intensity of the discussions about how to comply with the cookie consent requirement in a post-GDPR world, this issue has become a top worry for organisations and data protection officers. Partly due to the visibility of the mechanisms used to collect this consent, and partly due to the potential implications of operating a website without cookies, the dilemma around what solution to deploy has become a serious business decision.

Read full article: Cookie Consent Is the New Panic

Will Bulgaria get ePrivacy done in time?

Earlier this month the current Bulgarian Presidency of the European Council sent out a progress report on the draft ePrivacy regulation, and the question on everyone’s lips was whether there would be a general approach before Bulgaria gives up the presidency at the end of June.

Read full article: Will Bulgaria get ePrivacy done in time? Doesn’t look good

How GDPR changes use of Browser Fingerprinting and Web Trackers

Browser fingerprinting is on a collision course with privacy regulations. Compared to more well-known tracking “cookies,” browser fingerprinting is trickier for users and browser extensions to combat: websites can do it without detection, and it’s very difficult to modify browsers so that they are less vulnerable to it. As cookies have become more visible and easier to block, companies have been increasingly tempted to turn to sneakier fingerprinting techniques.

But companies also have to obey the law. And for residents of the European Union, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which entered into force on May 25th, is intended to cover exactly this kind of covert data collection. The EU has also begun the process of updating its ePrivacy Directive, best known for its mandate that websites must warn you about any cookies they are using.

Read article: The GDPR and Browser Fingerprinting: How It Changes the Game for the Sneakiest Web Trackers

Bulgarian Presidency Presents Progress Report and Points for Debate on ePrivacy

On January 10, 2017, the EU Commission adopted a proposal for a Regulation on Privacy and Electronic Communications. On June 8, 2018, the Council of the European Union’s Bulgarian Presidency presented a progress report on the draft ePR to the Transport, Telecommunications and Energy Council.

The Report reflects on the amendments presented in the May 2018 Examination of the Presidency text. The Report is split into two sections: Annex I, a progress report, and Annex II, questions for the policy debate.

Source: Bulgarian Presidency Presents Progress Report and Points for Debate on ePrivacy

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