fbpx

Download free GDPR compliance checklist!

Tag Archives for " Facebook "

Facebook and Barr Escalate Standoff Over Encrypted Messages

With 1.5 billion users, Facebook’s WhatsApp is perhaps the world’s most commonly used encrypted communications platform.

Facebook executives and Attorney General William P. Barr sparred on Monday over whether encrypted messaging products should be open to law enforcement, escalating a standoff over privacy and policing.

In a letter to Mr. Barr, the executives overseeing Facebook’s WhatsApp and Messenger, Will Cathcart and Stan Chudnovsky, wrote that creating a so-called backdoor into their services for law enforcement would make their users less safe.

Source: Facebook and Barr Escalate Standoff Over Encrypted Messages – The New York Times

Facebook warns EU regulators seeking data access about privacy, liability risks

Facebook warned European Union regulators on Monday against forcing tech giants to open their vast troves of data to rivals, saying such a move would carry privacy and liability risks.

European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager has voiced concerns that tech industry heavyweights might leverage their power to block rivals and that regulators could have to force them to provide key data to competitors to prevent that.

Source: Facebook warns EU regulators seeking data access about privacy, liability risks – Reuters

Facebook Testing a Way to Let You Move Photos to Rival Sites

The company, accused by the E.U. of stifling competition, is trying a tool in Ireland that would allow users to move photos and videos to Google.

Facebook is trying to make it easier for users to move photos from the social network to rival online services, reacting to European privacy laws and criticism from regulators that its size and control over data hinder competition.

Facebook said it would begin testing a “data portability” tool in Ireland that would allow users there to move photos and videos from Facebook to Google Photos. Critics immediately said the initiative did not go far enough.

Source: Facebook Testing a Way to Let You Move Photos to Rival Sites – The New York Times

NSO Employees Take Legal Action Against Facebook for Banning Their Accounts

The lawsuit argues Facebook violated its own terms of service and Israeli privacy law for using the employees’ personal information.

Last month, Facebook itself sued NSO in California for leveraging a vulnerability in the WhatsApp chat program that NSO Group clients used to hack targets. As part of that, Facebook also banned the personal Facebook and Instagram accounts of multiple current and former NSO employees.

Source: NSO Employees Take Legal Action Against Facebook for Banning Their Accounts – VICE

Facebook Seeks Dismissal Of Location Privacy Class-Action

Facebook is asking a federal judge to throw out a lawsuit claiming it wrongly collected users’ IP addresses and deduced their approximate locations, even when they attempted to prevent locationtracking.

Facebook counters in its new papers that it has never concealed its IP-address practices. The company also says its alleged practices don’t amount to the kind of “egregious” acts that would potentially violate people’s privacy.

Source: Facebook Seeks Dismissal Of Location Privacy Class-Action 11/19/2019

Facebook, Google Fund Nonprofits Shaping Federal Privacy Debate

Few companies have more riding on proposed privacy legislation than Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc. To try to steer the bill their way, the giant advertising technology companies spend millions of dollars to lobby each year, a fact confirmed by government filings.

Not so well-documented is spending to support highly influential think tanks and public interest groups that are helping shape the privacy debate, ostensibly as independent observers.

Source: Facebook, Google Fund Nonprofits Shaping Federal Privacy Debate

Facebook Earns $132.80 From Your Data per Year

The newly released files indicate that between 2013 and 2015, moves that Facebook touted as protecting consumer privacy—like stopping Six4Three and other companies from accessing the names, photos, and likes of their users’ Facebook friends—were really about safeguarding the economic value of consumers’ data.

Leaked documents reveal that Facebook’s average revenue per user in the United States and Canada totaled $132.80 in the past four quarters—seven times more than the $18.70 average revenue per U.S. and Canadian user in 2013. But more importantly, Facebook executives worried that new social networks and messaging apps could get started using Facebook’s data as a jumping-off point.

 

Source: Facebook’s Six4Three Pikinis lawsuit emails explain why your data is so valuable.

EU could introduce political ad rules for Facebook and Twitter

Vera Jourova, EU commissioner for justice, consumers and gender equality, said in a CNBC interview lawmakers in Brussels will introduce rules for more transparency in political campaigning. Companies including Facebook and Twitter will have to obey them.

Legislation around political ads would bolster the EU’s efforts to take a leading role regulating the world’s biggest technology companies on issues ranging from disinformation to competition and data privacy.

Source: EU could introduce political ad rules for Facebook and Twitter

Leaked documents show Facebook leveraged user data to fight rivals and help friends

A cache of leaked Facebook documents of approximately 7,000 pages shows how the company’s CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, oversaw plans to consolidate the social network’s power and control competitors by treating its users’ data as a bargaining chip.

Taken together, they show how Zuckerberg, along with his board and management team, found ways to tap Facebook users’ data — including information about friends, relationships and photos — as leverage over the companies it partnered with. In some cases, Facebook would reward partners by giving them preferential access to certain types of user data while denying the same access to rival companies.

Source: Leaked documents show Facebook leveraged user data to fight rivals and help friends

Facebook accepts Cambridge Analytica fine

Facebook has said it will pay the £500,000 financial penalty that the social network was issued by the UK’s data privacy watchdog, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO).

The fine came as a result of Facebook’s role in the Cambridge Analytica scandal, news of which first broke in March 2018.

Source: #Privacy: Facebook accepts ICO Cambridge Analytica fine

>