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Tag Archives for " facial recognition "

LAPD Bans Use Of Commercial Facial Recognition

The Los Angeles Police Department has banned the use of commercial facial recognition systems.

The LAPD, the third-largest police department in the United States, issued a moratorium on the use of third-party facial recognition software on Nov. 13

News showed that its officers were using Clearview AI, a facial recognition platform that has taken data from Facebook and other social media platforms.

Source: LAPD Bans Use Of Commercial Facial Recognition

How regulators can get facial recognition technology right

As facial recognition technology (FRT) spreads, regulators have tools to ensure that this technology does not result in inaccurate or biased outcomes.

Policymakers can ensure that responsible protocols are in place to validate that facial recognition technology works as billed and to inform decisions about whether and how to use FRT. In building a framework for responsible testing and development, policymakers should empower regulators to use stronger auditing authority and the procurement process to prevent facial recognition applications from evolving in ways that would be harmful to the broader public.

Full article: How regulators can get facial recognition technology right

Leaks and lawsuits blight Russia facial recognition

The rise of cloud computing and AI technologies have popularised the technology globally, with supporters saying it promises greater security and efficiency.

With more than 105,000 cameras, Moscow boasts one of the world’s most comprehensive surveillance systems. It became fully operational this year and authorities say it has cut crime and helped the city enforce coronavirus lockdown restrictions.

But the backlash is growing, too, as critics say benefits come at the cost of lost privacy and increased surveillance. The rights activists say cameras have been used to monitor political rallies and a lack of clear rules allows for abuse.

Full article: Leaks and lawsuits blight Russia facial recognition

Police Are Tapping Into Ring Cameras to Expand Surveillance Network In Mississippi

The police department in Jackson, Mississippi is partnering with two companies to stream surveillance footage from Ring cameras in a 45-day pilot program.

This may come as a surprise to those who remember that just a few months ago, Jackson was the first city in the South to ban police from using facial recognition technology. Amazon’s Ring subsidiary has made numerous successful inroads with police across the U.S., however, and police are continuing to warm up to the technology.

Source: Police Are Tapping Into Ring Cameras to Expand Surveillance Network In Mississippi

Portland, Maine Votes to Add Teeth to Ban on Facial Recognition

Voters in Portland, Maine passed a ballot initiative that strengthens the city’s ban on the use of facial recognition by law enforcement and city agencies.

The City Council previously passed an order banning face surveillance, but the initiative strengthens the ban with a private right of action and penalties for violations of the law.

A growing list of cities have banned facial recognition technology, including Boston, Oakland, San Francisco, and Portland, Oregon.

Source: EPIC – Portland, Maine Votes to Add Teeth to Ban on Facial Recognition

Live facial recognition is tracking kids suspected of being criminals

In Buenos Aires, the first known system of its kind is hunting down minors who appear in a national database of alleged offenders.

Buenos Aires first began trialing live facial recognition on April 24, 2019. Implemented without any public consultation, the system sparked immediate resistance. In October, a national civil rights organization filed a lawsuit to challenge it. In response, the government drafted a new bill—now going through legislative processes—that would legalize facial recognition in public spaces.

Source: Live facial recognition is tracking kids suspected of being criminals | MIT Technology Review

French Supervisory Authority Releases Strict Guidance on the Use of Facial Recognition Technology at Airports

On October 9, 2020, the French Supervisory Authority (CNIL) issued guidance on the use of facial recognition technology for identity checks at airports.

The CNIL indicates that it has issued this guidance in response to a request from several operators and service providers of airports in France who are planning to deploy this technology on an experimental basis. In this blog post, we summarize the main principles that the CNIL says airports should observe when deploying biometric technology.

Source: French Supervisory Authority Releases Strict Guidance on the Use of Facial Recognition Technology at Airports | Inside Privacy

Hospitals And VA Clinics Use Facial Recognition And Palm Scanners To Track Patients

Massachusetts area hospitals and VA clinics have begun installing Xecan facial recognition cameras to identify and track patients.

According to Xecan, they have been providing ‘touchless clinic technology’ to hospitals and clinics for at least ten years. What makes Xecan so unique is using ‘immunocompromised cancer patients’ and COVID-19 together to justify using facial recognition in hospitals.

Source: Hospitals And VA Clinics Use ‘Xecan’ Facial Recognition And Palm Scanners To Track Patients | MassPrivateI

Facial recognition datasets are being widely used despite being taken down due to ethical concerns.

Computer vision research datasets have been criticized for violating subjects’ privacy, reinforcing cultural biases, and enabling questionable applications. But regulating their use is hard.

Yet the data that has been taken down for ethical reasons isn’t just available — it continues to be used prominently in academic research. Further, even if a dataset was created for benign purposes, it may have uses in more questionable areas. Oftentimes, these uses are enabled by a derived dataset.

Full article: Facial recognition datasets are being widely used despite being taken down due to ethical concerns. Here’s how.

Activists Turn Facial Recognition Tools Against the Police

Mr. Howell is a lifelong protester and self-taught coder. He had begun researching how to build a facial recognition product that could defeat officers’ attempts to shield their identity.

Mr. Howell is not alone in his pursuit. Law enforcement has used facial recognition to identify criminals, using photos from government databases or, through a company called Clearview AI, from the public internet. But now activists around the world are turning the process around and developing tools that can unmask law enforcement in cases of misconduct.

Full article: Activists Turn Facial Recognition Tools Against the Police – The New York Times

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