fbpx

Download free GDPR compliance checklist!

Tag Archives for " facial recognition "

MEPs raise concerns on EU plans for police facial recognition database

MEPs on the European Parliament’s Civil Liberties Committee have questioned EU plans to establish a bloc-wide facial recognition database for use by police authorities, citing the potential abuse of data as well as the likelihood of false positives.

As part of a planned extension of the EU’s 2008 Prum Decision, which allows for the exchange of DNA, fingerprint and vehicle registration data, member states have proposed that police authorities be given powers that permit them to share facial images.

Source: MEPs raise concerns on EU plans for police facial recognition database – EURACTIV.com

Japan’s police introduce facial recognition system in criminal probes

About 10 million facial images are currently stored in the agency’s database, including those of suspects referred to prosecutors who have not been arrested.

Japanese police have been using a system that can match photos of people who have been previously arrested with images gathered by surveillance cameras and social media, police officials said Saturday, a move that could raise concerns about privacy violations.

The facial analysis system has been operated by police across the nation since March to identify criminal suspects more quickly and accurately, the officials said. But critics warn that the system could turn the country into a surveillance society unless it is operated under strict rules.

Source: Japan’s police introduce facial recognition system in criminal probes | The Japan Times

IBM pushes for US to limit facial recognition system exports

IBM has called for the US Department of Commerce to limit the export of facial recognition systems, particularly to countries that could potentially use it for mass surveillance, racial profiling, or other human rights violations.

In a letter [PDF] to the Commerce Department, IBM highlighted the need for tighter export controls for facial recognition technologies that employ for what it referred to as “1-to-many” matching.

Source: IBM pushes for US to limit facial recognition system exports | ZDNet

Portland, Oregon Becomes First Jurisdiction in U.S. to Ban the Commercial Use of Facial Recognition Technology

On September 9, 2020, Portland, Oregon became the first jurisdiction in the country to ban the commercial use of facial recognition technology in public places within the city, including stores, restaurants and hotels.

The city Ordinance was unanimously passed by the Portland City Council and will take effect on January 1, 2021. Beginning January 1, 2021, “private entities” will be prohibited from using “face recognition technologies” in “places of public accommodation” within Portland, except (1) to the extent necessary to comply with federal, state or local laws; (2) for user verification purposes to access the user’s own personal or employer-issued communication and electronic devices; or (3) in automatic face detection services in social media applications.

Source: Portland, Oregon Becomes First Jurisdiction in U.S. to Ban the Commercial Use of Facial Recognition Technology

Portland City Council Votes to Ban Facial Recognition

The Portland City Council has passed two ordinances banning the use of facial recognition.

One ordinance prohibits the city from using facial recognition. A second ordinance prohibits private companies from using facial recognition in public spaces. Thus Portland joins a growing list of cities that have banned the facial recognition technology, including Boston, Oakland, and San Francisco.

Source: Portland City Council Votes to Ban Facial Recognition

Commission will ‘not exclude’ potential ban on facial recognition technology

The European Commission has not ruled out a future ban on the use of facial recognition technology in Europe, as the EU executive mulls the findings of a recent public consultation on Artificial Intelligence.

Speaking to MEPs on the European Parliament’s Internal Market Committee on 3 September, Kilian Gross of the Commission’s DG Connect said that all options were still on the table.

Should a potential ban on facial recognition technologies in public places ever manifest in the EU, it would provide clarity on an issue long debated by the Commission.

Source: Commission will ‘not exclude’ potential ban on facial recognition technology – EURACTIV.com

Lincolnshire Police to trial new CCTV tech that can tell if you’re in a mood

New facial-recognition technology enabling people’s moods to be picked up by CCTV is set to be trialled by Lincolnshire Police.

Officers will be able to enter searches for people wearing hats and glasses – and can even find those showing a certain mood or expression.

Source: Lincolnshire Police to trial new CCTV tech that can tell if you’re in a mood – Lincolnshire Live

A New Tool Jams Facial Recognition Technology

Berlin-based startup  recently launched a public interest campaign to help solve the problem of authorities using facial recognition technology to identify protesters.

The campaign website, , provides a free privacy engineering service that quickly removes “facial fingerprints” from user-uploaded images. Software scans the original photos and creates new images that look strikingly similar to the originals but which contain an essential difference – new photos have new synthetic faces.

Source: A New Tool Jams Facial Recognition Technology With Digital Doppelgängers | by Evan Selinger | Aug, 2020 | OneZero

US Senate Bill Limits Corporate Use of Facial Recognition

On August 4, 2020, Senators Jeff Merkley (OR) and Bernie Sanders (VT) introduced the National Biometric Information Privacy Act of 2020.

The bill would require companies to obtain individuals’ consent before collecting biometric data. Specifically, the bill would prohibit private companies from collecting biometric data—including eye scans, voiceprints, faceprints and fingerprints—without individuals’ written consent, and from profiting off of biometric data.

Source: Senate Bill Limits Corporate Use of Facial Recognition

Clearview AI landed a new facial recognition contract with ICE

The controversial facial recognition software maker Clearview AI has a new contract with ICE, the most controversial U.S. government agency.

Clearview was already known to work with the branch of Homeland Security fiercely criticized for implementing the Trump administration’s harsh immigration policies. The new contract makes it clear that relationship is ongoing — and that Clearview isn’t just playing a bit part in tech’s lucrative scrum for federal contracts.

Source: Clearview AI landed a new facial recognition contract with ICE | TechCrunch

1 2 3 22
>