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Tag Archives for " facial recognition "

Billions of smartphone owners will soon be authorising payments using facial recognition

New analysis shows that facial recognition and other biometric authentication technologies will increasingly help to keep mobile payments safe from fraudsters.

Smartphone owners are already used to staring at their screens to safely unlock their devices without having to dial in a secret code; now, facial recognition will increasingly be deployed to verify the identity of a user making a payment with their handset, whether that’s via an app or directly in-store, in wallet mode.

Source: Billions of smartphone owners will soon be authorising payments using facial recognition | ZDNet

Facial recognition can identify you even if your face is blurred

A group from the Max-Planck Institute found that blurred images were still individually identifiable with just a few non-obscured images to train from. With the proliferation of images on social networks, it is possible that almost anyone’s blurred face could still be identified.

The researchers said only 10 fully-visible examples of a person’s face were needed to identify a blurred image with 91.5 per cent accuracy. With an average of just 1.25 tagged images, the system could still correctly identify an individual 56.8 per cent of the time, which is 73 times higher than chance would allow.

Source: Facial recognition can identify you even if your face is blurred | WIRED UK

Army Wants to Automate Base Access With Facial Recognition

The Army wants to make sure drivers entering bases through automated checkpoints are, in fact, who they claim to be, and is developing a new biometric camera system to assist.

The military branch issued a call on its Small Business Innovation Research, or SBIR, broad agency announcement—a contract vehicle used for working with small businesses on phased, iterative development programs—seeking early-stage design for a camera system able to pull usable images of drivers approaching checkpoints and matching those photos against a facial biometric database.

Source: Army Wants to Automate Base Access With Facial Recognition at Drive-Thru Checkpoints – Nextgov

Apple prohibits manufacturers from collecting facial scans, biometric data of employees

Apple’s new guidelines prohibit manufacturing partners from collecting biometric data such as fingerprints or facial scans of Apple employees who visit their facilities. The new rules, however, do not apply to workers employed by manufacturers or partners’ employees.

The new rule, which is reportedly a part of Apple’s updated factory security guidelines, aims to preserve its employees’ privacy to prevent prototypes, designs other intellectual property from being stolen or shared with outsiders.

The guidelines also reportedly make other changes to help crackdown on product leaks that come from the supply chain. Apple will also require manufacturers to run criminal background checks on all workers. It is also mandating that the use of surveillance cameras be increased at these facilities.

Source: Apple prohibits manufacturers from collecting facial scans, biometric data of employees – Technology News

How Grassroots Coalition Beat Facial Recognition in New Orleans

Last December, the city of New Orleans voted to ban facial recognition, joining Oakland, Somerville, Portland, San Francisco, and other cities that have successfully pushed back against the widely-criticized surveillance technology.

Across the US, various nonprofits and politicians have opposed police use of facial recognition, predictive policing, and other technologies which are known to disproportionately target communities of color.

Full article: How Musicians and Sex Workers Beat Facial Recognition in New Orleans

Uber under pressure over facial recognition checks for drivers

Uber’s use of facial recognition technology for a driver identity system is being challenged in the U.K., where the App Drivers & Couriers Union (ADCU) and Worker Info Exchange (WIE) have called for Microsoft to suspend the ride-hailing giant’s use of B2B facial recognition after finding multiple cases where drivers were mis-identified and went on to have their licence to operate revoked by Transport for London (TfL).

The union said it has identified seven cases of “failed facial recognition and other identity checks” leading to drivers losing their jobs and licence revocation action by TfL.

Labor activists are piling pressure on Uber from the other direction too — pointing out that no regulatory standard has been set around the workplace surveillance technology that the ADCU says TfL encouraged Uber to implement.

Source: Uber under pressure over facial recognition checks for drivers | TechCrunch

Amazon Subjects Its Drivers to Biometric Surveillance

It comes as little surprise that Amazon, the company that brought you Ring doorbell cameras and Rekognition face surveillance, has a tenuous understanding of both privacy and consent. Earlier this week, Motherboard revealed the company’s cruel “take it or leave” demand to its 75,000 delivery drivers: submit to biometric surveillance or lose your job.

Amazon’s “Privacy Policy for Vehicle Camera Technology” states it may collect “face image and biometric information.” The company uses this information, among other things, to verify driver identity, and to provide “real-time in-vehicle alerts” about driver behaviors such as potentially distracted driving.

Source: Dystopia Prime: Amazon Subjects Its Drivers to Biometric Surveillance | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Facial Recognition: What Happens When We’re Tracked Everywhere We Go?

A majority of us go around showing our faces all the time. We post selfies on the internet. Walking down the street, we are unwittingly photographed by surveillance cameras and by strangers we inadvertently photo-bomb. Until recently, we’ve had little reason to think deeply about the fact that each of our faces is as unique as a fingerprint or a Social Security number.

Behind the scenes, though, a quiet revolution has been afoot to unlock the secrets of our faceprints. It has been powered by an enormous influx of AI expertise into Silicon Valley in recent decades, much of it drawn out of the computer-science departments of elite universities. These experts have been put to work on a number of long-term projects, including language translation and self-driving cars, and one particularly intense area of research has been facial recognition.

Full article: Facial Recognition: What Happens When We’re Tracked Everywhere We Go? – The New York Times

Advocacy Groups Again Ask CBP to Withdraw Biometrics Expansion Proposal

Technology and immigration advocacy organizations and other researchers are again calling for Customs and Border Protection to put the brakes on the planned expansion of its biometric entry-exit program.

CBP proposed a rule to “advance the legal framework” so that the Homeland Security Department could initiate a full-scale biometric entry-exit program—which at least initially relies on facial recognition technology—by moving beyond pilots and port limitations.

Advocacy groups all opposed the rule, citing privacy concerns, risks of error, and failure to explain how to prevent discrimination in the implementation of the program.

Source: Advocacy Groups Again Ask CBP to Withdraw Biometrics Expansion Proposal – Nextgov

Greek police roll out new ‘smart’ devices with facial recognition

Under a Smart Policing plan announced in 2017, Greece will equip roughly 1,000 police officers with smartphone-like devices by summer 2021. Up to 10,000 officers could eventually get them.

The devices will be connected to national and European databases, according to the Hellenic Police, and officers who carry them on patrols will be able to use them to identify people by scanning their faces and fingerprints.

But critics say the project erodes privacy protections. And some warn against expanding police surveillance powers at a time when activists allege police brutality in Greece is on the rise.

Source: Greek police roll out new ‘smart’ devices with facial recognition

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