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Tag Archives for " facial recognition "

London police to deploy live facial recognition cameras

The Metropolitan police has announced that it will begin the operational use of Live Facial Recognition (LFR) technology.

The cameras will be linked to a database of suspects, to which if the system detects someone an alert is generated, and ff the system detects someone who is not on the database their information will not be saved.

Source: #Privacy: Metropolitan police to deploy facial recognition cameras

EU considers ban of facial recognition for up to five years

The European Commission has revealed it is considering a ban on the use of facial recognition in public areas for up to five years.

The European Commission wants time to work out how to prevent the technology being abused. Exceptions to the ban could be made for security projects as well as research and development.

 

Source: Facial recognition: EU considers ban of up to five years – BBC News

Fight against facial recognition hits wall across the West

The result is an impasse that has left tech companies largely in control of where and how to deploy facial recognition.

One big reason: Western governments are embracing this technology for their own use, valuing security and data collection over privacy and civil liberties.

Full article: Fight against facial recognition hits wall across the West – POLITICO

NIST Study Evaluates Algorithmic Bias

A new NIST study examines how accurately face recognition software tools identify people of varied sex, age and racial background.

Results captured in the report, Face Recognition Vendor Test (FRVT) Part 3: Demographic Effects (NISTIR 8280), are intended to inform policymakers and to help software developers better understand the performance of their algorithms. Face recognition technology has inspired public debate in part because of the need to understand the effect of demographics on face recognition algorithms.

Source: NIST Study Evaluates Effects of Race, Age, Sex on Face Recognition Software | NIST

DHS May Require U.S. Citizens Be Photographed at Airports

Federal officials are considering requiring that all travelers — including American citizens — be photographed as they enter or leave the country as part of an identification system using facial-recognition technology.

The Department of Homeland Security says it expects to publish a proposed rule next July. Facial recognition is already being tested by several airlines at a number of U.S. airports.

Source: DHS May Require U.S. Citizens Be Photographed at Airports | Time

French Supervisory Authority publishes guidance on facial recognition

On November 15, 2019, the French Supervisory Authority (CNIL) published guidance on the use of facial recognition. The guidance is primarily directed at public authorities in France that want to experiment with facial recognition.

The guidance warns that this technology risks leading to biased results and sets out three general requirements for deploying facial recognition on an experimental basis.

First, facial recognition can only be used if there is an established need to implement an authentication mechanism that ensures a high level of reliability, and there are no other less intrusive means that would be appropriate. Second, the experimental use of facial recognition must respect the rights of individuals. Third, the use of facial recognition on an experimental basis must have a precise timeline and be based on a rigorous methodology setting out the objectives pursued and the criteria for success.

Source: French Supervisory Authority publishes guidance on facial recognition

The Risks Of Law Enforcement Use Of Facial Recognition Software

Facial recognition is truly a one-of-a-kind technology — and we should treat it as such. Our faces are central to our identities, online and off, and they are difficult to hide.

the use of facial recognition technology by law enforcement is particularly problematic due to its invasiveness and increasing pervasiveness. Americans are losing due-process protections, and even law-abiding citizens cannot confidently engage in free association, free movement and free speech without fear of being tracked.

Full article: Who Stole My Face? The Risks Of Law Enforcement Use Of Facial Recognition Software | Above the Law

Mass surveillance fears as India readies facial recognition system

As India prepares to install a nationwide facial recognition system in an effort to catch criminals and find missing children, human rights and technology experts on Thursday warned of the risks to privacy from increased surveillance.

There is little information on where it will be deployed, what the data will be used for and how data storage will be regulated.

Worldwide, the rise of cloud computing and artificial intelligence technologies have popularised the use of facial recognition for a range of applications from tracking criminals to catching truant students.

Source: Mass surveillance fears as India readies facial recognition system – Reuters

IBM calls for regulation on facial recognition tech instead of bans

IBM wants the US government to regulate facial recognition technology, instead of banning it outright. “Precision regulation” can restrict potentially harmful uses while still allowing for innovation, the company said Tuesday in a white paper posted online.

Facial recognition has faced backlash from privacy advocates and lawmakers, and a handful of cities have banned the municipal use of the technology. In July, Microsoft asked the federal government to regulate facial recognition before it gets more widespread. Still, the technology is on track to become pervasive in airports and shopping centers, and some companies like Amazon are selling it to police departments.

Source: IBM calls for regulation on facial recognition tech instead of bans – CNET

Regulating Facial Recognition Tech – Where Are We Now?

While there are clearly now multiple efforts to curtail the use of facial recognition technology (FRT) in the public realm, the reality is that the genie is already out of the bottle and there is no way to put it back.

The efforts above range from limited bans within the public sector, to reviews of new implementations of the tech, to specific court cases against police use of FRT. In short, it’s a patchwork of efforts, and there are huge gaps between them. Many examples also tend to focus on State-backed projects, rather than in the private sector – which is also experimenting with the tech, often in the public domain.

Meanwhile, the technology and its use is still rapidly spreading around the world, and there remains as yet no fully tested national position on its use in countries such as the US and UK.

Full article: Regulating Facial Recognition Tech – Where Are We Now? – Artificial Lawyer

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