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Tag Archives for " facial recognition "

French Supervisory Authority publishes guidance on facial recognition

On November 15, 2019, the French Supervisory Authority (CNIL) published guidance on the use of facial recognition. The guidance is primarily directed at public authorities in France that want to experiment with facial recognition.

The guidance warns that this technology risks leading to biased results and sets out three general requirements for deploying facial recognition on an experimental basis.

First, facial recognition can only be used if there is an established need to implement an authentication mechanism that ensures a high level of reliability, and there are no other less intrusive means that would be appropriate. Second, the experimental use of facial recognition must respect the rights of individuals. Third, the use of facial recognition on an experimental basis must have a precise timeline and be based on a rigorous methodology setting out the objectives pursued and the criteria for success.

Source: French Supervisory Authority publishes guidance on facial recognition

The Risks Of Law Enforcement Use Of Facial Recognition Software

Facial recognition is truly a one-of-a-kind technology — and we should treat it as such. Our faces are central to our identities, online and off, and they are difficult to hide.

the use of facial recognition technology by law enforcement is particularly problematic due to its invasiveness and increasing pervasiveness. Americans are losing due-process protections, and even law-abiding citizens cannot confidently engage in free association, free movement and free speech without fear of being tracked.

Full article: Who Stole My Face? The Risks Of Law Enforcement Use Of Facial Recognition Software | Above the Law

Mass surveillance fears as India readies facial recognition system

As India prepares to install a nationwide facial recognition system in an effort to catch criminals and find missing children, human rights and technology experts on Thursday warned of the risks to privacy from increased surveillance.

There is little information on where it will be deployed, what the data will be used for and how data storage will be regulated.

Worldwide, the rise of cloud computing and artificial intelligence technologies have popularised the use of facial recognition for a range of applications from tracking criminals to catching truant students.

Source: Mass surveillance fears as India readies facial recognition system – Reuters

IBM calls for regulation on facial recognition tech instead of bans

IBM wants the US government to regulate facial recognition technology, instead of banning it outright. “Precision regulation” can restrict potentially harmful uses while still allowing for innovation, the company said Tuesday in a white paper posted online.

Facial recognition has faced backlash from privacy advocates and lawmakers, and a handful of cities have banned the municipal use of the technology. In July, Microsoft asked the federal government to regulate facial recognition before it gets more widespread. Still, the technology is on track to become pervasive in airports and shopping centers, and some companies like Amazon are selling it to police departments.

Source: IBM calls for regulation on facial recognition tech instead of bans – CNET

Regulating Facial Recognition Tech – Where Are We Now?

While there are clearly now multiple efforts to curtail the use of facial recognition technology (FRT) in the public realm, the reality is that the genie is already out of the bottle and there is no way to put it back.

The efforts above range from limited bans within the public sector, to reviews of new implementations of the tech, to specific court cases against police use of FRT. In short, it’s a patchwork of efforts, and there are huge gaps between them. Many examples also tend to focus on State-backed projects, rather than in the private sector – which is also experimenting with the tech, often in the public domain.

Meanwhile, the technology and its use is still rapidly spreading around the world, and there remains as yet no fully tested national position on its use in countries such as the US and UK.

Full article: Regulating Facial Recognition Tech – Where Are We Now? – Artificial Lawyer

UK’s DPA: police should think over live facial recognition technology

How far should we, as a society, consent to police forces reducing our privacy in order to keep us safe?

The current combination of laws, codes and practices relating to live facial recognition (LFR) will not drive the ethical and legal approach that’s needed to truly manage the risk that this technology presents.

The absence of a statutory code that speaks to the specific challenges posed by LFR will increase the likelihood of legal failures and undermine public confidence in its use.

Full article: Blog: Live facial recognition technology – police forces need to slow down and justify its use | ICO

Sweden authorises the use of facial recognition technology by the police

Sweden’s data protection authority has approved the use of facial recognition technology by the police, to help identify criminal suspects.

According to the Swedish authority, the processing and storage measures comply with Sweden’s Crime Data Act and the EU’s Data Protection Law Enforcement Directive (GDPR).

The decision is controversial following successive bans of this technology in US cities. The technology is widely used in China.

Source: Sweden authorises the use of facial recognition technology by the police | New Europe

Facebook alters video to make people invisible to facial recognition

Facebook AI Research says it’s created the first machine learning system that can stop a facial recognition network from identifying people in videos.

In initial tests, the method was able to thwart state-of-the-art facial recognition systems. The AI for automatic video modification doesn’t need to be retrained to be applied to each video. It maps a slightly distorted version on a person’s face in order to make it difficult for facial recognition technology to identify a person.

Source: Facebook alters video to make people invisible to facial recognition | VentureBeat

Facebook must face $35B facial-recognition lawsuit following court ruling

Facebook’s most recent attempt to extricate itself from a potentially landmark lawsuit has come to a dead end, as a federal court declined to hear another appeal to stop the $35 billion class action.

In San Francisco last week, the US Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit denied Facebook’s petition for an en banc hearing in the case. Usually, appeals cases are heard by a panel of three judges out of all the judges who work in a given circuit. An en banc hearing is a kind of appeal in which a much larger group of judges hears a case. In the 9th Circuit, 11 of the 29 judges sit on en banc cases.

Source: Facebook must face $35B facial-recognition lawsuit following court ruling | Ars Technica

Amazon Calls for Government Regulation of Facial Recognition Tech

Amazon said it believes that governments should act to regulate the use of facial recognition technology to ensure it is used appropriately.

The company said it will back US federal privacy legislation “that requires transparency, access to personal information, ability to delete personal information, and that prohibits the sale of personal data without consent.”

Source: Amazon Calls for Government Regulation of Facial Recognition Tech | SecurityWeek.Com

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