fbpx

Free tools and resources for Data Protection Officers!

Tag Archives for " facial recognition "

Why facial recognition’s racial bias problem is so hard to crack

Nearly 40 percent of the false matches by Amazon’s facial recognition tool, which is being used by police, involved people of color.

Tech companies have responded to the criticism by improving the data used to train their facial recognition systems, but they’re also calling for more government regulation to help safeguard the technology from being abused.

Source: Why facial recognition’s racial bias problem is so hard to crack – CNET

A.I. Experts Question Amazon’s Facial-Recognition Technology

At least 25 prominent researchers are calling on the company to stop selling the technology to law enforcement agencies, citing concerns that it has built-in biases.

Amazon sells a product called Rekognition through its cloud-computing division, Amazon Web Services. The company said last year that early customers included the Orlando Police Department in Florida and the Washington County Sheriff’s Office in Oregon.

Source: A.I. Experts Question Amazon’s Facial-Recognition Technology – The New York Times

Facial recognition is coming to hotels

Alibaba has created the hotel of the future and it’s wild, wonderful, and just a little creepy.

FlyZoo, which is reportedly a Chinese pun for “must stay,” is a 290-room ultra-modern boutique hotel in Hangzhou, China that lets guests play with technology, check in with ease, and spend the night in the future for a low price of around $205—and at the cost of your privacy.

Full article: Alibaba’s FlyZoo hotel uses facial recognition check in tech

How Facial Recognition Databases See Copyright Law But Not Your Privacy

Whether you realize it or not, your face may not be “yours” anymore.

Certain companies engaging in facial recognition research (like IBM) obtain photos from publicly available collections for research purposes to “train” their algorithms, without your permission or even knowledge.

From a copyright perspective, they are covered by “fair use” of copyrighted works for “purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research….”. Or they use compilations of photos licensed under Creative Commons license,

Full article: In Your Face: How Facial Recognition Databases See Copyright Law But Not Your Privacy | Above the Law

With facial recognition, shoplifting may get you banned in places you’ve never been

There are hundreds of stores using facial recognition – none that have any rules or standards to prevent abuse.

With facial recognition, getting caught in one store could mean a digital record of your face is shared across the country. Stores are already using the technology for security purposes and can share that data – meaning that if one store considers you a threat, every business in that network could come to the same conclusion. One mistake could mean never being able to shop again.

Full article: With facial recognition, shoplifting may get you banned in places you’ve never been – CNET

MoviePass founder wants to use facial recognition to score you free movies

PreShow is developing an app to earn you free movie tickets – to any film in any theater – if you watch 15 to 20 minutes of high-end advertising.

But PreShow hinges on what some may consider a cost and others consider a bargain: facial recognition. PreShow’s app will only unlock with your phone’s facial recognition technology. And while you’re watching the ads to earn that free ticket, your phone’s camera monitors your level of attention. Walk away or even obscure part of your face? The ad will pause after five seconds.

Source: MoviePass founder wants to use facial recognition to score you free movies – CNET

Facial recognition: Apple, Amazon, Google and the race for your face

Facial recognition is a blossoming field of technology that is at once exciting and problematic. If you’ve ever unlocked your iPhone by looking at it, or asked Facebook or Google to go through an unsorted album and show you pictures of your kids, you’ve seen facial recognition in action.

But at the very least, facial recognition raises questions of privacy. Experts have concerns ranging from the overreach of law enforcement, to systems with hidden racial biases, to hackers gaining access to your secure information.

Full article: Facial recognition: Apple, Amazon, Google and the race for your face – CNET

New US facial recognition bill would require consent before sharing data

A new bill introduced in the Senate today would prohibit commercial companies using facial recognition technology from collecting or sharing people’s data without their explicit consent.

Under the bill, users would need to be notified whenever their facial recognition data is used or collected. According to the lawmakers, it also would require third-party testing before the tech could be introduced into the market to ensure it is unbiased and doesn’t harm consumers.

Source: New facial recognition bill would require consent before sharing data – The Verge

The US Government Will Use Facial Recognition In Top Airports

US Customs and Border Protection is scrambling to implement “biometric entry-exit system,” with the goal of using facial recognition technology on travelers aboard 16,300 flights per week — or more than 100 million passengers traveling on international flights out of the United States — in as little as two years. This, despite questionable biometric confirmation rates and few, if any, legal guardrails.

Source: The US Government Will Use Facial Recognition In Top Airports

IBM used Flickr photos for facial-recognition project

IBM has been accused of using Flickr photos for a facial-recognition project, without the full consent of people in the images.

The company extracted nearly one million photos from a dataset of Flickr images originally compiled by Yahoo.

Many people pictured were probably unaware of how their data had been used. But one digital rights group said IBM’s actions represented a “huge threat” to people’s privacy.

Source: IBM used Flickr photos for facial-recognition project – BBC News

1 2 3 11
>