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Tag Archives for " facial recognition "

Facebook alters video to make people invisible to facial recognition

Facebook AI Research says it’s created the first machine learning system that can stop a facial recognition network from identifying people in videos.

In initial tests, the method was able to thwart state-of-the-art facial recognition systems. The AI for automatic video modification doesn’t need to be retrained to be applied to each video. It maps a slightly distorted version on a person’s face in order to make it difficult for facial recognition technology to identify a person.

Source: Facebook alters video to make people invisible to facial recognition | VentureBeat

Facebook must face $35B facial-recognition lawsuit following court ruling

Facebook’s most recent attempt to extricate itself from a potentially landmark lawsuit has come to a dead end, as a federal court declined to hear another appeal to stop the $35 billion class action.

In San Francisco last week, the US Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit denied Facebook’s petition for an en banc hearing in the case. Usually, appeals cases are heard by a panel of three judges out of all the judges who work in a given circuit. An en banc hearing is a kind of appeal in which a much larger group of judges hears a case. In the 9th Circuit, 11 of the 29 judges sit on en banc cases.

Source: Facebook must face $35B facial-recognition lawsuit following court ruling | Ars Technica

Amazon Calls for Government Regulation of Facial Recognition Tech

Amazon said it believes that governments should act to regulate the use of facial recognition technology to ensure it is used appropriately.

The company said it will back US federal privacy legislation “that requires transparency, access to personal information, ability to delete personal information, and that prohibits the sale of personal data without consent.”

Source: Amazon Calls for Government Regulation of Facial Recognition Tech | SecurityWeek.Com

How Photos of Your Kids Are Powering Surveillance Technology

One day in 2005, a mother in Evanston, Ill., joined Flickr. She uploaded some pictures of her children. Years later, their faces are in a database that’s used to test and train some of the most sophisticated artificial intelligence systems in the world called MegaFace.

By law, most Americans in the database don’t need to be asked for their permission. However, residents of Illinois are protected by one of the strictest state privacy laws on the books: the Biometric Information Privacy Act, a 2008 measure that imposes financial penalties for using an Illinoisan’s fingerprints or face scans without consent.

Full article: How Photos of Your Kids Are Powering Surveillance Technology – The New York Times

China to Require Facial Recognition for Internet, Cell Phones

Starting December 1, Chinese citizens will have to allow telecommunications carriers to scan their faces when signing up for internet access or to get a new phone number.

Registering your face in exchange for internet access just makes it easier to track what you post on social media, and what websites you might frequent. The Chinese government already has a vise-grip on the internet, in which sites like Facebook and Twitter are blocked.

Source: China to Require Facial Recognition for Internet, Cell Phones

Google Facial Recognition Tactics Raise Racial, Privacy Concerns

In the past, facial recognition technology has notoriously had a harder time identifying people with darker skin. Google wants to avoid that pitfall.

Company is building a massively diverse database, ostensibly so products like the biometric features on its upcoming Pixel 4 smartphone don’t suffer from a racial bias.

The Silicon Valley-based company’s efforts to gather as much facial recognition data as it can — especially from people of color — has raised questions about the tactics it employs to meet that end.

Source: Google Facial Recognition Tactics Raise Racial, Privacy Concerns

French Liberte Tested by Nationwide Facial Recognition ID Plan

France is poised to become the first European country to use facial recognition technology to give citizens a secure digital identity — whether they want it or not.

Saying it wants to make the state more efficient, President Emmanuel Macron’s government is pushing through plans to roll out an ID program, dubbed Alicem, in November, earlier than an initial Christmas target. The country’s data regulator says the program breaches the European rule of consent and a privacy group is challenging it in France’s highest administrative court. It took a hacker just over an hour to break into a “secure” government messaging app this year, raising concerns about the state’s security standards.

Source: French Liberte Tested by Nationwide Facial Recognition ID Plan – Bloomberg

Amazon is writing facial recognition law

Amazon’s Chief Executive Jeff Bezos said the company’s public policy team is working on proposed regulations around facial recognition, a fledgling technology that has drawn criticism of the technology giant’s cloud computing unit.

Critics have pointed to technology from Amazon and others that struggled to identify the gender of individuals with darker skin in recent studies. That has prompted fears of unjust arrests if the technology is used by more law enforcement agencies to identify suspects.

Source: Amazon CEO says company working on facial recognition regulations – Reuters

Gatwick Airport commits to facial recognition tech at boarding

Gatwick has become the UK’s first airport to confirm it will use facial-recognition cameras on a permanent basis for ID checks before passengers board planes.

It follows a self-boarding trial carried out in partnership with EasyJet last year.

The London airport said the technology should reduce queuing times but travellers would still need to carry passports.

Source: Gatwick Airport commits to facial recognition tech at boarding – BBC News

Google Seeks to Establish Facial Recognition in Homes

With opposition growing to facial recognition, Google has decided instead to build facial recognition into Nest Hub Max, an “always on” device intended for use in the home.

Google’s “face match” constantly targets the facial images of each person in the household. Any interaction with the Google device is added to the secret user profile Google maintains for ad targeting.

Source: Google Seeks to Establish Facial Recognition in Homes

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