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Tag Archives for " facial recognition "

Facial Recognition Tech Is Growing Stronger, Thanks to Your Face

Large databases, built with images from social networks and dating services, contain millions of pictures of people’s faces. Some are shared worldwide. There is no oversight of the data sets.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials employed facial recognition technology to scan motorists’ photos to identify undocumented immigrants. The F.B.I. also spent more than a decade using such systems to compare driver’s license and visa photos against the faces of suspected criminals.

Full article: Facial Recognition Tech Is Growing Stronger, Thanks to Your Face – The New York Times

Facebook’s face recognition software should worry us.

Facebook holds “the largest facial dataset to date”—powered by DeepFace, Facebook’s deep-learning facial recognition system.

Policymakers and experts are now beginning to weigh how the government’s use of facial recognition should be regulated and constrained. A crackdown on how government agencies can use the technology needs to consider how companies do, too.

Full article: Facebook’s face recognition software should worry us.

You’re responsible for getting permission from subjects if you want to use Windows Photos’ facial recog feature

Microsoft has begun rolling out an update to the Photos app in Windows 10 that prompts you to confirm “all appropriate consents from the people in your photos and videos”, in order to use facial recog to find snaps of your friends and loved ones.

Microsoft has decided that additional safeguards are needed, and has come up with the notion that you should obtain “appropriate consents” from the people in your pictures.

Full article: You’re responsible for getting permission from subjects if you want to use Windows Photos’ facial recog feature • The Register

Facial recognition smart glasses could make public surveillance discreet and ubiquitous

A new product from UAE firm NNTC shows where this tech is headed next. The AR glasses have an 8-megapixel camera embedded in the frame which allows the wearer to scan faces in a crowd and compare with a database of 1 million images.

Technology like this means law enforcement agencies can adopt facial recognition algorithms and use them in public spaces with less hassle and fewer distractions. That means it’s likely to be used more widely.

Source: Facial recognition smart glasses could make public surveillance discreet and ubiquitous – The Verge

New tool helps travelers avoid airlines that use facial recognition technology

A new tool launched by privacy activists offers to help travelers avoid increasingly invasive facial recognition technologies in airports.

Activist groups Fight for the Future, Demand Progress and Credo on Wednesday unveiled a new website called AirlinePrivacy.com, which shows users what airlines use facial recognition to verify the identity of passengers before boarding. The site also helps customers to directly book flights with airlines that don’t use facial recognition technologies.

Source: New tool helps travelers avoid airlines that use facial recognition technology

Apple Face-Recognition Blamed for False Arrest

A New York student sued Apple Inc. for $1 billion, claiming the company’s facial-recognition software falsely linked him to a series of thefts from Apple stores.

Ousmane Bah, 18, said he was arrested at his home in New York in November and charged with stealing from an Apple store. The arrest warrant included a photo that didn’t resemble Bah, he said in a lawsuit filed Monday. Apple said it doesn’t use facial recognition in its stores.

Source: Apple Face-Recognition Blamed by N.Y. Teen for False Arrest – Bloomberg

Why facial recognition’s racial bias problem is so hard to crack

Nearly 40 percent of the false matches by Amazon’s facial recognition tool, which is being used by police, involved people of color.

Tech companies have responded to the criticism by improving the data used to train their facial recognition systems, but they’re also calling for more government regulation to help safeguard the technology from being abused.

Source: Why facial recognition’s racial bias problem is so hard to crack – CNET

A.I. Experts Question Amazon’s Facial-Recognition Technology

At least 25 prominent researchers are calling on the company to stop selling the technology to law enforcement agencies, citing concerns that it has built-in biases.

Amazon sells a product called Rekognition through its cloud-computing division, Amazon Web Services. The company said last year that early customers included the Orlando Police Department in Florida and the Washington County Sheriff’s Office in Oregon.

Source: A.I. Experts Question Amazon’s Facial-Recognition Technology – The New York Times

Facial recognition is coming to hotels

Alibaba has created the hotel of the future and it’s wild, wonderful, and just a little creepy.

FlyZoo, which is reportedly a Chinese pun for “must stay,” is a 290-room ultra-modern boutique hotel in Hangzhou, China that lets guests play with technology, check in with ease, and spend the night in the future for a low price of around $205—and at the cost of your privacy.

Full article: Alibaba’s FlyZoo hotel uses facial recognition check in tech

How Facial Recognition Databases See Copyright Law But Not Your Privacy

Whether you realize it or not, your face may not be “yours” anymore.

Certain companies engaging in facial recognition research (like IBM) obtain photos from publicly available collections for research purposes to “train” their algorithms, without your permission or even knowledge.

From a copyright perspective, they are covered by “fair use” of copyrighted works for “purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research….”. Or they use compilations of photos licensed under Creative Commons license,

Full article: In Your Face: How Facial Recognition Databases See Copyright Law But Not Your Privacy | Above the Law

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