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Tag Archives for " Google "

Google Workspace has high data protection risks, says Dutch government

A Dutch government report identifying “10 high data protection risks” for users of Google Workspace, formerly known as G Suite, has been revised after Google’s response, and now says eight high risk issues still remain.

Dutch Government’s Data Protection Impact Assessment still considers that there are legal obstacles to adopting Google Workspace around the roles and obligations of data processors and data controllers under the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Source: Dutch government: Did we say 10 ‘high data protection risks’ in Google Workspace block adoption? Make that 8 • The Register

Privacy Debated in Fight Over Google Chrome Browser History Tracking

The plaintiffs in the class action claim they signed up for Chrome because Google explicitly said they would not have their browsing history sent to Google unless they decided to “sync” the browser with their account.

Despite these assurances, Chrome tracked their web browsing and sent it to Google, in violation of federal law and the newly minted California Consumer Privacy Act.

Google attorney Andrew Schapiro said plaintiffs had misconstrued the issue, saying that each of the plaintiffs was notified their web browsing history would be tracked when they agreed to the terms of service.

The attorney for Google also said the plaintiffs misunderstand how the advertising tracking component of the company works, because it tracks web browsing based on the website not on the browser.

Source: Privacy Debated in Fight Over Google Chrome Browser History Tracking – Courthouse News Service

Google challenges French data watchdog’s €100 million fine in court

France’s administrative court known as the Council of State considered on Thursday an application for interim measures filed by Google LLC and Google Ireland after the French Data Protection Authority known as the CNIL fined the digital giant €100 million last December for its cookie collection policy.

In its deliberation of 7 December 2020, the French data protection authority (CNIL) accused the US giant, whose European headquarters are based in Dublin, of contravening the law on information technology, files, and freedoms.

For its part, Google has appealed to the one-stop-shop mechanism provided for in the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which, in its view, requires it to report on data protection matters only to the corresponding authority in the country in which it is based, namely Ireland.

Source: Google challenges French data watchdog’s €100 million fine in court – EURACTIV.com

Google admits failing to wipe all Android apps with location-selling X-Mode SDK from its Play Store

Google on Friday removed 25 Android apps from the Google Play Store after missing them during a prior purge. The apps contained the X-Mode SDK that the Chocolate Factory previously banned for selling location data.

The SDK gathers location data that X-Mode, a Reston, Virginia-based data broker, then sells to third-parties. In early December, Google and Apple gave mobile app developers seven days and two weeks respectively to jettison the X-Mode SDK, a software library the developers had integrated into their apps in exchange for payment.

Due to an oversight during our enforcement process, 25 apps containing the X-Mode SDK were not removed from Google Play after the developers were given a 7-day warning.

Source: Oops: Google admits failing to wipe all Android apps with location-selling X-Mode SDK from its Play Store • The Register

Google is reportedly working on an anti-tracking feature for Android

Google is looking to develop an anti—tracking feature for Android similar to the one Apple is rolling out with iOS 14.5.

The tech giant is reportedly in the early stages of exploring how it can limit data collection and cross-app tracking for its mobile OS. However, it intends to find a less stringent solution than Apple’s so as not to completely alienate its advertising partners.

Source: Google is reportedly working on an anti-tracking feature for Android | Engadget

Google Explores Alternative to Apple’s New Anti-Tracking Feature

Google is exploring an alternative to Apple Inc.’s new anti-tracking feature, the latest sign that the internet industry is slowly embracing user privacy, according to people with knowledge of the matter.

Internally, the search giant is discussing how it can limit data collection and cross-app tracking on the Android operating system in a way that is less stringent than Apple’s solution, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing private plans.

Google is trying to balance the rising demands of privacy-conscious consumers with the financial needs of developers and advertisers. The Alphabet Inc. unit is seeking input from these stakeholders, similar to how it’s slowly developing a new privacy standard for web browsing called the Privacy Sandbox.

Source: Google Explores Alternative to Apple’s New Anti-Tracking Feature – Bloomberg

Google eyes privacy-friendly substitute to cookies

Google on Monday said new test results show promising signs that the technology it’s hoping will replace cookie-based ad targeting is working.

Google has been testing a new API (a software interface) called Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) that acts as an effective replacement signal for third-party cookies. The API exists as a browser extension within Google Chrome.

Google has other proposals to replace cookies in the works, so it’s not guaranteed that FLoC will be the answer, but the company said it’s highly encouraged by what it has seen so far.

Source: Google eyes privacy-friendly substitute to cookies – Axios

Brussels zeroes in on Google’s adtech business

Brussels is not done with Google and has added the advertising technology at the heart of the search giant’s business model to its long list of concerns.

After slapping the U.S. search giant with fines exceeding €8 billion in three antitrust cases, the European Commission is now running two more investigations into Google. The first focuses on how the U.S. company gathers and uses data and the second one on how it behaves in the advertising business. The second case focuses on Brussels’ investigation into “Google’s practices in the advertising technology (“ad tech”) value chain, and its position in relation to advertisers, publishers and intermediaries, and competitors in search advertising, display advertising and ad tech services,” the document continues.

Source: Brussels zeroes in on Google’s adtech business – POLITICO

Here’s What Google Didn’t Say in Its Promises About Our Privacy

Roughly a month after being hit with a pretty damning antitrust suit led by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, Google issued its response on Sunday via a public blog post tackling some of the more “misleading” allegations.

Google’s core arguments on the privacy and power front are actually really similar in one specific way: They only ring true if you don’t actually question Google’s claims.

Full artile: Google’s Rebuttal Against Its Antitrust Probes Falls Flat

Google Smart Speakers Offer Guest Mode for Privacy

Google smart speakers are getting a new setting that will allow consumers to significantly boost the privacy of their devices using voice commands, instead of having to sort through menus on the Home app.

The new setting, called Guest Mode, limits the device’s ability to collect data about users’ interactions with Google Assistant on the speaker, while retaining most of the popular functionality, including the option to field questions, play music, set timers, and control smart home devices.

Source: Google Smart Speakers Offer Guest Mode for Privacy – Consumer Reports

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