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How the GDPR will disrupt Google and Facebook

Google and Facebook will be unable to use the personal data they hold for advertising purposes without user permission. This is an acute challenge because, contrary to what some commentators have assumed, they cannot use a “service-wide” opt-in for everything. Nor can they deny access to their services to users who refuse to opt-in to tracking. Some parts of their businesses are likely to be disrupted more than others.

Source: How the GDPR will disrupt Google and Facebook | PageFair

The Spanish DPA confirms compliance of Google Cloud commitments for international data flows

Google is pleased to announce that the Spanish Data Protection Agency (“Agencia Española de Protección de Datos” or “AEPD”) has issued a decision confirming that the guarantees established by the contractual commitments provided by Google for the international transfers of data to U.S. connected to its G Suite and Google Cloud Platform (GCP) services are adequate. Therefore, the international transfers to U.S. under such contractual commitments are deemed authorized by the AEPD provided the conditions established by the AEPD’s decision are met.

Source: The Spanish Data Protection Authority (AEPD) confirms compliance of Google Cloud commitments for international data flows

Google Chrome Will Soon Warn You of Software That Performs MitM Attacks

Google Chrome 63 will include a new security feature that will detect when third-party software is performing a Man-in-the-Middle (MitM) attack that hijacks the user’s Internet connection.

Source: Google Chrome Will Soon Warn You of Software That Performs MitM Attacks

Court attributes Google’s privacy violations to ‘browser architecture’

31 August 2017 The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (‘the Court of Appeals’) issued, on 22 August 2017, its ruling in Paloma Gaos et. al. v. Google, Inc., in which it held that the District Court for the Northern District of California had not abused its discretion by approving a class action settlement brought by users of the search engine, on grounds that Google had violated their privacy by disclosing their search terms to third parties.

Source: USA: Court of Appeals attributes Google’s privacy violations to ‘browser architecture’

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