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European privacy search engines aim to challenge Google

The backlash over Big Tech’s collection of personal data offers new hope to a number of little-known search engines that promise to protect user privacy. Sites like Britain’s Mojeek , France’s Qwant , Unbubble in Germany and Swisscows don’t track user data, filter results or show “behavioral” ads.

These sites are growing amid the rollout of new European privacy regulations and numerous corporate data scandals, which have raised public awareness about the mountains of personal information companies stealthily gather and sell to advertisers.

Full article: European privacy search engines aim to challenge Google

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Gets Reputation Hit After Data Blunders

Facebook is the least trustworthy of all major tech companies when it comes to safeguarding user data, according to a new national poll conducted for Fortune, highlighting the major challenges the company faces following a series of recent privacy blunders.

Only 22% of Americans said that they trust Facebook with their personal information, far less than Amazon (49%), Google (41%), Microsoft (40%), and Apple (39%).

Full article: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Gets Reputation Hit After Data Blunders | Fortune

Will Google+ be the final push US Congress needs to pass restrictions on data use?

Congress held a hearing a few weeks ago in response to news that Google kept secret a flaw that exposed almost 500,000 users’private user data on its Google+ platform. Though there is no evidence that data was actually used, and data breach laws as written today do not kick in until there is an actual “breach” involving an unauthorized acquisition of the data.

However, Google deliberately hid the problem from the public in order to avoid the type of bad publicity Facebook was getting from its Cambridge Analytica data breach. U.S. Senators at the hearing appeared to be troubled both by the legal loophole protecting Google from disclosure and with Google’s calculated decision to keep secrets.

Source: Will Google+ be the final push Congress needs to pass restrictions on data use? – MarTech Today

Google will now take you through your privacy settings step-by-step

Google has introduced a handful of new security measures as part of Cybersecurity Awareness Month, starting with a risk assessment feature. It also leveled up its Security Checkup feature, so that once you’ve signed in, it will ask you to delete any apps it thinks is harmful and to cut off any devices you don’t use anymore.

As part of Google’s updated Security Checkup, it will now also let you know whenever you share any of your Google data with third-party apps. Finally, if Google believes that your account has been compromised, it will automatically trigger a process that prompts you to perform a series of verifications.

Source: Google will now take you through your privacy settings step-by-step

Google has made it easier to delete your search history and adjust privacy controls

You will soon be able to review and delete your recent searches as well as get a simplified array of privacy controls and a rundown on how your data is used in relation to Search from the page itself.

All of these settings, as well as a short explanatory video, will be accessible from the main menu when on the Search screen, under a settings tab entitled “Your data in Search”.

Full article: Google has made it easier to delete your search history and adjust privacy controls | TechRadar

GDPR Has Made Google Even More Dominant In Europe

Over the last few years, the EU has been screaming about the awfulness of evil large tech companies in the name of Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple (sometimes called “GAFA”). However, EU law will mostly serve to lock in those companies as the dominant providers. That’s because they’re big enough to manage the regulatory burden, whereas startups and smaller competitors will not be able to and will suffer.

Full article: Just As Expected: GDPR Has Made Google Even More Dominant In Europe | Above the Law

Regulator in Ireland asks for more knowledge on Google+ data breach

The Irish Data Protection Commission (IDPC) is to ask Google for more details regarding a bug which led to the revealing of 500,000 Google+ users this week, a CNBC report reveals. The ubiquitous search engine giant took to social media on Monday to disclose the issue to the world, admitting that the glitch meant tech developers could access Google+ users’ personal details.

Source: Regulator in Ireland asks for more knowledge on Google+ data breach

How One Privacy-First Search Engine Is Benefiting From Google’s Mistakes

DuckDuckGo is a pro-privacy company taking an aggressive stance on not tracking people across all corners of the internet. One has to wonder if its product practically markets itself in 2018. With an endless parade of headlines centered around violations of user privacy by the likes of Google and Facebook, it’s no wonder DuckDuckGo experienced 50% growth in the last year, with its daily searches crossing the 30 million mark.

Source: How One Privacy-First Search Engine Is Benefiting From Google’s Mistakes

When big companies are hacked, should they have to disclose it immediately?

That old truism from the Watergate affair also applies to the scandals plaguing some of the world’s biggest tech companies. Google+ hack that the company sat on for months and did not disclose until the Wall Street Journal came knocking.

Full article: When big companies are hacked, should they have to disclose it immediately? – Recode

What does Google know about you?

Google first began as the helpful search engine which endeavored to index the entire web. As the company grew, it moved into other online content areas, including the popular webmail offering, Gmail, the online office suite Google Documents, as well as personal cloud storage courtesy of Google Drive, navigation with Google Maps, and Android OS.

With so many avenues for data collection, Google rapidly acquired a good deal of information on each user. This begs the question: what is the company doing with all this data?

Full article: What does Google know about you? | TechRadar

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