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Tag Archives for " Google "

Google promises tighter and better privacy controls

Google announced plans to improve privacy for customers on Android, Gmail, and other services and apps that make use of Google account data.

The company published findings of an internal project called Strobe; it used the project to analyze how third-party developers interact with Google account and Android device data, and whether interactions affected user privacy.

Google made the decision to shut down Google+, the company’s social networking service, and make a number of other changes to strengthen user privacy by limiting developers or changing existing workflows.

Source: Google promises tighter and better privacy controls – gHacks Tech News

Google taking new steps to prevent malicious Chrome extensions

Google has announced plans to further restrict Chrome extensions in a bid to crack down on the number of malicious extensions found in the Chrome Web Store. The first new measure is to give the users of extensions greater control over which sites extensions can access. The other measures are applied to the extension development process.

Source: Google taking new steps to prevent malicious Chrome extensions | Ars Technica

UK high court blocks mass privacy action against Google

UK high court has blocked a mass lawsuit against Google that aimed to collect as much as £3bn in compensation for the company’s historical practice of collecting data on iPhone users whose privacy settings should have prevented surveillance.

The litigation was brought by the campaign group Google You Owe Us. The group sought permission to have the case heard as a “representative action”, a form of class-action lawsuit that would have allowed one legal team to represent the millions of affected users without needing to individually gain their support.

Source: UK high court blocks mass privacy action against Google | Technology | The Guardian

Google Plus Will Be Shut Down After User Information Was Exposed

Google did not notify authorities of the vulnerabilities in Google Plus, which exposed the data of up to 500,000 users. Google said it had found no evidence that outside developers were aware of the security flaw and no indication that any user profiles were touched. The flaw was fixed in an update made in March. There is no federal law requiring companies to disclose a security vulnerability. Companies must wade through a patchwork of state laws with different standards.

Source: Google Plus Will Be Shut Down After User Information Was Exposed – The New York Times

Google and Facebook join rights groups to fight Australia’s encryption bill

Google and Facebook have joined civil and digital rights groups in an unusual alliance aimed at defeating Australia’s planned encryption laws. The bill gives law enforcement new powers to conduct covert surveillance on electronic devices and compel technology companies to assist in decrypting private communications.

Source: Google and Facebook join rights groups to fight Australia’s encryption bill | Technology | The Guardian

Silicon Valley finally pushes for data privacy laws at Senate hearing

Amazon, Apple, Google, and others endorsed federal data privacy laws Wednesday, but experts argue consumer voices were lacking It seems Silicon Valley and Congress can finally agree on something after all – the need for data privacy regulation.

Source: Silicon Valley finally pushes for data privacy laws at Senate hearing

Google Tweaks Chrome in Response to Privacy Criticism

Under fire from security experts, Google is making tweaks to the way it manages how people sign in to its popular web browser, Chrome. Because of a recent update to the browser, if a user signs into a Google account — such as to use Gmail or Google Docs — Chrome also logs in the user automatically. Now, Google says that in the next version of the browser software, being released next month, users will be able to opt out of the automatic sign-in.

Source: Google Tweaks Chrome in Response to Privacy Criticism – The New York Times

Am I logged in or not? GDPR case study on the example of Chrome browser change

Starting with Chrome 69, when you log into a Google service (GMail, or so), Google Chrome is effectively logging you into the browser. This change apparently “solves” the hypothetical issue of user confusion: “am I logged into the system or into the browser?” And at the same time is creating others.

Full article: Am I logged in or not? GDPR case study on the example of Chrome browser change

Google still allows third-party apps scan your Gmail data

Gmail lets third-party developers integrate services into its email platform, such as trip planners and custom relationship management systems. Developers may share data with third parties so long as they are transparent with the users about how they are using the data. The company noted that it has a process in place for identifying apps that misrepresent themselves or aren’t transparent about how personal data is used.

Source: Google still allows third-party apps scan your Gmail data

Google Chrome’s New Password Trick Makes Your Accounts More Secure

Google and other tech companies have been on a mission to kill passwords. It’s easy enough to see why. We have dozens or even hundreds and we don’t always make the best choices when we create them. Re-use and weak passwords make our accounts easier to hack. The password manager has learned a new trick in Chrome 69. It takes all the hard work out of dreaming up hard-to-hack passwords by creating them for you.

Source: Google Chrome’s New Password Trick Makes Your Accounts More Secure

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