Tag Archives for " hacking "

Russian cyber threat pushes UK to sign world’s largest digital security pact 

Theresa May will strengthen the UK’s digital defences through a £15m online security pact with Commonwealth allies amid warnings over the growing threat of cyber warfare from Russia.

Leaders from the 53-nation bloc are expected to sign the world’s largest cyber declaration, pledging to join forces to combat criminals and hostile actors engaged in potentially devastating cyber attacks, and to support smaller nations to raise their security standards by 2020.

Source: Russian cyber threat pushes UK to sign world’s largest digital security pact | The Independent

Russian hackers mass-exploit routers in homes, govs, and infrastructure

Hackers working on behalf of the Russian government are compromising large numbers of routers, switches, and other network devices belonging to governments, businesses, and critical-infrastructure providers, US and UK officials warned Monday.

The Russian government-sponsored actors are using the compromised devices to perform man-in-the-middle attacks that extract passwords, intellectual property, and other sensitive information and to lay the groundwork for potential intrusions in the future, the officials continued. The warning was included in a technical alert jointly issued by the US Department of Homeland Security and FBI and the UK’s National Cyber Security Center.

Source: Russian hackers mass-exploit routers in homes, govs, and infrastructure | Ars Technica

Cryptojacking is the biggest threat right now

McAfee CEO Christopher Young on the online security market, the biggest cybersecurity threats and the pressing need to secure oneself in a world of connected devices.

In an interview this week, Young spoke about the progress that McAfee has made as a separate company over the last one year, his views on the online security market, the biggest threats that individuals, companies and governments are likely to face this year, and the pressing need for security in a world of connected devices.

Source: Cryptojacking is the biggest threat right now: McAfee’s Christopher Young – Livemint

US suspects cellphone spying devices in DC

For the first time, the U.S. government has publicly acknowledged the existence in Washington of what appear to be rogue devices that foreign spies and criminals could be using to track individual cellphones and intercept calls and messages.

The use of what are known as cellphone-site simulators by foreign powers has long been a concern, but American intelligence and law enforcement agencies — which use such eavesdropping equipment themselves — have been silent on the issue until now.

Source: APNewsBreak: US suspects cellphone spying devices in DC

11 Tell-Tale Signs Your Accounts and Devices Have Been Hacked

No one likes getting hacked, and it’s generally true that the quicker you can spot something has gone awry, the better your chances of minimizing the damage.

These are the main warning signs to look out for, what they might mean, and some quick pointers about what you should do next.

Source: 11 Tell-Tale Signs Your Accounts and Devices Have Been Hacked

Cloud computing highlights new security challenges in hybrid IT

During the recent Tech Field Day 16 event, Forcepoint teased the beginning of what I believe is a much-needed shift in hybrid IT security. At the VMware-sponsored FutureNet conference, a Verizon spokesman shared the fundamental challenge with hybrid IT security: There isn’t a consistent construct on which to build a security enforcement plan across the public and private cloud.

The traditional approach to enterprise security relies on network access control (NAC). NAC has proven a crutch for enterprise security for years, as security professionals could loosely base identity on the node where traffic originates.

Source: Serverless computing highlights new security challenges in hybrid IT – TechRepublic

U.S. Blames Russia for Cyber Attacks on Energy Infrastructure

On March 15, 2018, the Trump Administration took the unprecedented step of publicly blaming the Russian government for carrying out cyber attacks on American energy infrastructure.

According to a joint Technical Alert issued by the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI, beginning at least as early as March 2016, Russian government cyber actors carried out a “multi-stage intrusion campaign” that sought to penetrate U.S. government entities and a wide range of U.S. critical infrastructure sectors, including “organizations in the energy, nuclear, commercial facilities, water, aviation and critical manufacturing sectors.”

Source: U.S. Blames Russia for Cyber Attacks on Energy Infrastructure

Ditch The False Sense Of Security And Take Charge Of Your Online Privacy

On Consumer Rights Day, we’re reminded that the digital marketplace is where scams, fraud and identity theft to flourish.

According to a recent survey put out by TD Canada Trust, nearly three-quarters of Canadian millennials say they feel at risk of becoming a victim of cybercrime — and they should be.

Source: Ditch The False Sense Of Security And Take Charge Of Your Online Privacy

A Cyberattack in Saudi Arabia Had a Deadly Goal. Experts Fear Another Try.

In August, a petrochemical company with a plant in Saudi Arabia was hit by a new kind of cyberassault. The attack was not designed to simply destroy data or shut down the plant, investigators believe. It was meant to sabotage the firm’s operations and trigger an explosion.

The attack was a dangerous escalation in international cyberwarfare, as faceless enemies demonstrated both the drive and the ability to inflict serious physical damage.

Source: A Cyberattack in Saudi Arabia Had a Deadly Goal. Experts Fear Another Try. – The New York Times

Seven digital security habits that journalists should adopt

Cyber-surveillance is a bigger threat than ever. New forms of censorship are emerging, implemented by troll armies paid by authoritarian regimes. They include double switch, in which a journalist’s online account is taken over in order to disseminate fake news, smear the journalist, and censor independently reported news and information.

In response to these new threats, RSF recommends additional vigilance. This includes adopting both simple tools and good habits. The following recommendations are not meant to be exhaustive or to offer tools that will completely eliminate the dangers of surveillance or of someone taking over your accounts. Technology evolves quickly and today’s advice may not be relevant tomorrow.

Source: Seven digital security habits that journalists should adopt | RSF

1 2 3 12
>