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Tag Archives for " identity "

De-Identification Should Be Relevant to a Privacy Law, But Not an Automatic Get-Out-of-Jail-Free Card

The most important definition in any privacy law is the scope of information that is covered by that law. A line must be drawn somewhere between personal and non-personal data, the argument goes , or else laws will capture all information even if it presents no risks to an individual’s privacy.

Full article: De-Identification Should Be Relevant to a Privacy Law, But Not an Automatic Get-Out-of-Jail-Free Card

Why companies want to mine the secrets in your voice

The voice is highly personal, hard to fake, and it contains surprising information about our mental health and behaviors.

The Israeli company uses real-time voice analysis during calls to evaluate whether someone is likely to default on a bank loan, buy a more expensive product, or be the best candidate for a job.

Full article: Why companies want to mine the secrets in your voice – The Verge

Children’s identity theft on rise

Cyber criminals are hacking into sensitive networks to steal the identities of children and are selling it on in underground market places.

Personal information is leaked in data breaches all the time, but what makes the data on children so useful to cyber criminals is how they don’t have any credit history – so they offer a free pass for fraudulent purchases, loans and other transactions without the barriers that might be associated with data belonging to adults.

Source: The latest dark web cyber-criminal trend: Selling children’s personal data | ZDNet

How should we regulate facial-recognition technology?

The privacy concerns with facial-recognition technology are obvious: Nothing is more “personal” than one’s face.

So how is the processing of facial data regulated, whether such data is collected by a government agency as in China, or by a private entity like Apple or Facebook? And as facial-recognition technology use becomes more pervasive (as widely predicted), what restrictions are appropriate in the future?

Full article: How should we regulate facial-recognition technology?

Amazon Is Pushing Facial Technology That a Study Says Could Be Biased

Over the last two years, Amazon has aggressively marketed its facial recognition technology to police departments and federal agencies as a service to help law enforcement identify suspects more quickly.

However, in new tests, Amazon’s system had more difficulty identifying the gender of female and darker-skinned faces than similar services from IBM and Microsoft.

Source: Amazon Is Pushing Facial Technology That a Study Says Could Be Biased – The New York Times

Feds forcing mass fingerprint unlocks is an “abuse of power,” judge rules

According to a new ruling issued last week by a federal magistrate in Oakland, California, the government can’t get a warrant granting permission to turn up at a local house allegedly connected to a criminal suspect, seize all digital devices, and force anyone found at the house to use biometrics to try to unlock those devices.

Source: Feds forcing mass fingerprint unlocks is an “abuse of power,” judge rules | Ars Technica

Airport Surveillance Takes Off in a New, Dangerous Direction

In 2018, we learned that expanded biometric surveillance is coming to an airport near you. This includes face recognition, iris scans, and fingerprints. And government agencies aren’t saying anything about how they will protect this highly sensitive information.

Full article: Year in Review: Airport Surveillance Takes Off in a New, Dangerous Direction | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Risks from stolen Marriott data: espionage, ID theft, home burglaries

The data stolen from the Marriott hotel empire in a massive breach is so rich and specific it could be used for espionage, identity theft, reputational attacks and even home burglaries, security experts say.

Affected reservation system could be extremely enticing to nation-state spies interested in the travels of military and senior government officials.

Full article: Risks from stolen Marriott data: espionage, ID theft, home burglaries – East Bay Times

Companies ‘can sack workers for refusing to use fingerprint scanners’

Fair Work Commission rejects case by Queensland sawmill worker who said scanning system was a breach of his privacy Businesses using fingerprint scanners to monitor their workforce can legally sack employees who refuse to hand over biometric information on privacy grounds, the Fair Work Commission has ruled.

Full article: Companies ‘can sack workers for refusing to use fingerprint scanners’

Microchip implants are threatening workers’ rights

Initially, the chips are being used in place of ID cards as a way of opening secure doors. But there’s good reason to think the use of implants could expand to more sinister purposes, giving employers much greater control over their workers and raising serious concerns over issues related to human dignity, ethics and health.

Full article: Microchip implants are threatening workers’ rights

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