Tag Archives for " internet "

Privacy as an Afterthought: ICANN’s Response to the GDPR

Almost three years ago, the global domain name authority ICANN chartered a working group to consider how to build a replacement for the WHOIS database, a publicly-accessible record of registered domain names.

Because it includes the personal information of millions of domain name registrants with no built-in protections for their privacy, the legacy WHOIS system exposes registrants to the risk that their information will be misused by spammers, identity thieves, doxxers, and censors.

Source: Privacy as an Afterthought: ICANN’s Response to the GDPR

GDPR Privacy Policy Fail: Only 34% of EU Sites Compliant

Just a third of websites in the EU and even fewer in the UK have their privacy policy in order ahead of major new legislation set to land next month.

The European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) represents the biggest change to the EU’s privacy laws in almost a generation.

Source: GDPR Privacy Policy Fail: Only 34% of EU Sites Compliant – Infosecurity Magazine

DNS: Strengthening the Weakest Link in Internet Privacy

For many, the conversation about online privacy centers around a few high-profile companies, and rightly so. We consciously engage with their applications and services and want to know who else might access our information and how they might use it.

But there are other, less obvious ways that accessing the World Wide Web exposes us. In this post we will look at how one part of the web’s infrastructure, the Domain Name System (DNS), “leaks” your private information and what you can do to better protect your privacy and security. Although DNS has long been a serious compromise in the privacy of the web, we’ll discuss some simple steps you can take to improve your privacy online.

Source: DNS: Strengthening the Weakest Link in Internet Privacy

Google loses landmark ‘right to be forgotten’ case

A businessman has won his legal action to remove search results about a criminal conviction in a landmark “right to be forgotten” case that could have wide-ranging repercussions.

The ruling was made by Mr Justice Warby in London on Friday. The judge rejected a similar claim brought by a second businessman who was jailed for a more serious offence.

Source: Google loses landmark ‘right to be forgotten’ case | Technology | The Guardian

Is a decentralized ‘web 3.0’ the answer to our privacy concerns?

To many privacy professionals, a “user-centered internet for individuals” would only exist in a perfect utopian world.

Yet, as the blockchain ecosystem matures, individual control, trust, and security are consistent themes that blockchain and cryptocurrency platforms are attempting to tackle. In the not too distant future, a cryptographically secured digital identity may allow us to “trustlessly” complete transactions that would have previously required the exchange of personal data and layers of verification.

Source: Is a decentralized ‘web 3.0’ the answer to our privacy concerns?

ICANN will not get a moratorium on GDPR compliance

Data Protection Authorities that ICANN rightly insisted on seeking guidance from, told ICANN exactly what the Noncommercial Stakeholders Group (NCSG) and the Internet Governance Project had been telling them all along.

They need to define in detail a specific purpose of WHOIS in order to determine if specific uses of the data are legitimate; their data retention period must be justified by that specific purpose; they need to be careful with the international data transfer; and their certification process for tiered access must also comply with data protection norms.

Source: ICANN will not get a moratorium on GDPR compliance – Internet Governance Project

Is It Time for an Data Sharing Clearinghouse for Internet Researchers?

Today’s Senate hearing with Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg will start a long discussion on data collection and privacy from Internet companies.

Although the spotlight is currently on Facebook, we shouldn’t forget that the picture is broader: companies from device manufacturers to ISPs collect network traffic and use it for a variety of purposes.

Source: Is It Time for an Data Sharing Clearinghouse for Internet Researchers?

Privacy regulators in hotseat over future of ‘fundamental’ website owners list

The internet is at risk of becoming fragmented if online databases that show who owns websites are shut down after the EU’s new data protection law takes effect next month, the head of internet domain organisation ICANN has warned.

National data protection authorities from EU member states are under pressure to spell out whether the databases, known as the WHOIS system, can stay online and continue displaying personal information like names, email addresses and phone numbers of people who registered internet domain names.

Source: Privacy regulators in hotseat over future of ‘fundamental’ website owners list – EURACTIV.com

ICANN’s temporary solution for bringing WHOIS into line with GDPR

For the past few months, ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers), a charitable association under Californian law that administers certain top-level domain names, has been involved in an overhaul of WHOIS. This search service publicly lists the names and contact details of domain name holders.

Following extensive research, ICANN published a new temporary model on Feb. 28 that substantially modifies the philosophy of WHOIS. This model, dubbed “Calzone,” is designed to protect the private lives of domain name holders by guaranteeing that their names will remain confidential.

Source: Calzone: ICANN’s temporary solution for bringing WHOIS into line with GDPR

Oblivious DNS: Plugging the Internet’s Biggest Privacy Hole

The recent news that Mozilla and Cloudflare are deploying their own DNS recursive resolver has once again raised hopes that users will enjoy improved privacy, since they can send DNS traffic encrypted to Cloudflare, rather than to their ISP.

In this post, we explain why this approach only moves your private data from the ISP to (yet another) third party. You might trust that third party more than your ISP, but you still have to trust them. In this post, we present an alternative design—Oblivious DNS—that prevents you from having to make that choice at all.

Source: Oblivious DNS: Plugging the Internet’s Biggest Privacy Hole

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