Tag Archives for " internet "

Apple Just Made Safari the Good Privacy Browser

The newest version of Apple’s Safari comes with new privacy enhancing features. Browser will push back hard against the ad-tracking methods and device fingerprinting techniques that marketers and data brokers use to monitor web users as they browse.

The next version of Safari will explicitly prompt you when a website tries to access your cookies or other data, and let you decide whether to allow it, a welcome step toward explicit choices about online tracking. Safari will also make a dent in defeating the so-called “fingerprinting” approach, in which marketers use publicly accessible information about devices—like the way they’re configured, the fonts they have installed, and the plug-ins they run—to assign them an individual, trackable ID.

Source: WWDC 2018: Apple Just Made Safari the Good Privacy Browser | WIRED

Domain Names and GDPR

When the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) takes effect across the EU on 25 May 2018, large amounts of WHOIS data will no longer be publicly available. WHOIS has to date been a public register of contact information about people controlling domain names (and websites hosted at them), and so has been an important source of information about those who both own and infringe IP.

Source: Eu: Domain Names And Whois Information – Changes Afoot When The Gdpr Comes Into Force – Get Ready!

What Europe’s Tough New Data Law Means for You, and the Internet

The European Union is introducing some of the strictest online privacy rules in the world. The changes aim to give internet users more control over their information, but the long-term effects of the new law won’t be known for years.

Source: What Europe’s Tough New Data Law Means for You, and the Internet – The New York Times

How the internet tricks you out of privacy using ‘dark patterns’ of design

Deceptive design nudges, tricks and goads you into sharing more than you might intend to online — when you think you’re in control of your own data, you rarely are.

The padlock is the internet’s talisman of privacy and safety. It’s in the corner of your browser when you have a secure website connection. It appears on a Twitter protected profile. It indicates where to find Facebook’s privacy settings.

Source: How the internet tricks you out of privacy using ‘dark patterns’ of design | ABC Radio Australia

Privacy as an Afterthought: ICANN’s Response to the GDPR

Almost three years ago, the global domain name authority ICANN chartered a working group to consider how to build a replacement for the WHOIS database, a publicly-accessible record of registered domain names.

Because it includes the personal information of millions of domain name registrants with no built-in protections for their privacy, the legacy WHOIS system exposes registrants to the risk that their information will be misused by spammers, identity thieves, doxxers, and censors.

Source: Privacy as an Afterthought: ICANN’s Response to the GDPR

GDPR Privacy Policy Fail: Only 34% of EU Sites Compliant

Just a third of websites in the EU and even fewer in the UK have their privacy policy in order ahead of major new legislation set to land next month.

The European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) represents the biggest change to the EU’s privacy laws in almost a generation.

Source: GDPR Privacy Policy Fail: Only 34% of EU Sites Compliant – Infosecurity Magazine

DNS: Strengthening the Weakest Link in Internet Privacy

For many, the conversation about online privacy centers around a few high-profile companies, and rightly so. We consciously engage with their applications and services and want to know who else might access our information and how they might use it.

But there are other, less obvious ways that accessing the World Wide Web exposes us. In this post we will look at how one part of the web’s infrastructure, the Domain Name System (DNS), “leaks” your private information and what you can do to better protect your privacy and security. Although DNS has long been a serious compromise in the privacy of the web, we’ll discuss some simple steps you can take to improve your privacy online.

Source: DNS: Strengthening the Weakest Link in Internet Privacy

Google loses landmark ‘right to be forgotten’ case

A businessman has won his legal action to remove search results about a criminal conviction in a landmark “right to be forgotten” case that could have wide-ranging repercussions.

The ruling was made by Mr Justice Warby in London on Friday. The judge rejected a similar claim brought by a second businessman who was jailed for a more serious offence.

Source: Google loses landmark ‘right to be forgotten’ case | Technology | The Guardian

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