fbpx

Download free GDPR compliance checklist!

Tag Archives for " internet "

Privacy Debated in Fight Over Google Chrome Browser History Tracking

The plaintiffs in the class action claim they signed up for Chrome because Google explicitly said they would not have their browsing history sent to Google unless they decided to “sync” the browser with their account.

Despite these assurances, Chrome tracked their web browsing and sent it to Google, in violation of federal law and the newly minted California Consumer Privacy Act.

Google attorney Andrew Schapiro said plaintiffs had misconstrued the issue, saying that each of the plaintiffs was notified their web browsing history would be tracked when they agreed to the terms of service.

The attorney for Google also said the plaintiffs misunderstand how the advertising tracking component of the company works, because it tracks web browsing based on the website not on the browser.

Source: Privacy Debated in Fight Over Google Chrome Browser History Tracking – Courthouse News Service

Tracker pixels in emails are now an ‘endemic’ privacy concern

Spy pixels, also known as tracking pixels or web beacons, are invisible, tiny image files — including .PNGs and .GIFs — that are inserted in the content body of an email.

They may appear as clear, white, or another color to merge with the content and remain unseen by a recipient and are often as small as 1×1 pixels. Similar pixels are also widely used on web domains to track visitors.

However, according to Hey co-founder David Heinemeier Hansson, they also represent a “grotesque invasion of privacy.”

Full article: Tracker pixels in emails are now an ‘endemic’ privacy concern | ZDNet

Constitutional court bans bulk Internet surveillance in South Africa

In a landmark judgment handed down on Thursday, the constitutional court banned the South African state from bulk surveillance of online communication, preventing security agencies from hoovering up Internet data.

This sort of surveillance, which is routinely done by agencies such as the National Security Agency in the US and GCHQ in the UK – both of which have routinely tapped into submarine Internet cables – is now illegal in South Africa thanks to the country’s highest court.

Source: Constitutional court bans bulk Internet surveillance in South Africa – TechCentral

Privacy-focused DuckDuckGo launches new effort to block online tracking

DuckDuckGo, the maker of search engine and browser technology that doesn’t track you online, is sharing data it’s collected about online trackers with other companies so they can also protect your privacy.

The company said Thursday it’s started sharing a data set called Tracker Radar that details 5,326 internet domains used by 1,727 companies and organizations that track you online. The data is available to anyone, and browser maker Vivaldi said on Tuesday it has begun doing so.

Source: Privacy-focused DuckDuckGo launches new effort to block online tracking – CNET

Advertisers scramble to plan for the uncertain ‘cookieless future’

It’s hard to be sure of any potential outcome when there are so many question marks over what comes after third-party cookies.

With so much up in the air right now, advertisers are focused on what they do know — Google will remove cookies from its dominant browser sometime next year bar a major u-turn. Whatever advertisers’ beliefs are about how the industry has responded to this deadline, they’re slowly waking up to the idea that the answer — or at least part of it — rests on their ownership of first-party data in the absence of third-party data they’d usually get from cookies.

Full article: Advertisers scramble to plan for the uncertain ‘cookieless future’ | Digiday

He Created the Web. Now He’s Out to Remake the Digital World.

Three decades ago, Tim Berners-Lee devised simple yet powerful standards for locating, linking and presenting multimedia documents online. He set them free into the world, unleashing the World Wide Web.

Now Mr. Berners-Lee believes the online world has gone astray. Too much power and too much personal data, he says, reside with the tech giants like Google and Facebook — “silos” is the generic term he favors, instead of referring to the companies by name. Fueled by vast troves of data, he says, they have become surveillance platforms and gatekeepers of innovation.

But Mr. Berners-Lee is taking a different approach: His answer to the problem is technology that gives individuals more power.

Full article: He Created the Web. Now He’s Out to Remake the Digital World. – The New York Times

The vulnerabilities that allowed Russia’s SolarWinds hack have been known for decades

The most stunning thing about Russia’s latest hack of 18,000 computer networks—including those of at least six federal agencies, including the State Department, the Homeland Security Department, and the National Nuclear Security Administration—is not how sophisticated the attack was. It’s that these sorts of attacks are still happening—are still possible, in some cases easy—and that months can go by with nobody noticing them.

The awareness that something like this could happen dates all the way back to the dawn of the internet, when it was a Defense Department research-sharing project called the ARPANET.

Full article: The vulnerabilities that allowed Russia’s SolarWinds hack have been known for decades.

Firefox to ship ‘network partitioning’ as a new anti-tracking defense

Firefox 85, scheduled to be released next month, in January 2021, will ship with a feature named Network Partitioning as a new form of anti-tracking protection.

The feature is based on “Client-Side Storage Partitioning,” a new standard currently being developed by the World Wide Web Consortium’s Privacy Community Group. Network Partitioning will allow Firefox to save resources like the cache, favicons, CSS files, images, and more, on a per-website basis, rather than together, in the same pool.

Source: Firefox to ship ‘network partitioning’ as a new anti-tracking defense | ZDNet

New report shows Google tracks 80% of the Web, with Amazon likely to overtake Facebook as second-worst privacy threat

Google is tracking four-fifths of Web traffic, and is thus gaining unparalleled insights into what individuals are doing, and what the online trends are both globally and locally. That tracking data provides Google with market research that is unmatched by any other company.

In 2020 in the U.S., Amazon surpassed Facebook in tracking reach, clocking in at 29.4% tracker reach, with Facebook at only 23%. In the EU and globally, Amazon remains just behind Facebook, ranking 3rd most widespread and coming in at 17.2% reach in the EU and 19.2% globally.

Source: New report shows Google tracks 80% of the Web, with Amazon likely to overtake Facebook as second-worst privacy threat

Cloudflare and Apple design a new privacy-friendly internet protocol

Engineers at Cloudflare and Apple say they’ve developed a new internet protocol that will shore up one of the biggest holes in internet privacy that many don’t know even exists.

Dubbed Oblivious DNS-over-HTTPS, or ODoH for short, the new protocol makes it far more difficult for internet providers to know which websites you visit.

Source: Cloudflare and Apple design a new privacy-friendly internet protocol | TechCrunch

1 2 3 12
>