Tag Archives for " internet "

ICANN loses injunction bid in dispute over WHOIS data in Germany

A German appeal’s court has rejected a bid from the internet’s global domain name organisation, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), to force a domain name registrar in the country to collect additional personal data.

Source: ICANN loses injunction bid in dispute over WHOIS data in Germany

Browser setting rules could be dropped from new ePrivacy Regulation

Plans to force web browser providers to ask users to set their privacy preferences could be scrapped, according to ePrivacy Regulation proposals under consideration by EU law makers as they have raised a lot of concerns. Such requirement would create burden for browsers and apps, the competition aspect, the link to fines for non-compliance but also the impact on end-users and the ability of this provision to address e.g. the issue of consent fatigue.

Source: Browser setting rules could be dropped from new e-Privacy Regulation

Against privacy defeatism: why browsers can still stop fingerprinting

Because of differences in operating systems, browser versions, fonts, plugins, and at least a dozen other factors, different users’ web browsers tend to look different. This can be exploited by websites and third-party trackers to create so-called fingerprints. These fingerprints are much more effective than cookies for tracking users across websites: they leave no trace on the device and cannot easily be reset by the user.

The question is simply this: how effective is browser fingerprinting? That is, how unique is the typical user’s device fingerprint? The answer has big implications for online privacy. But studying this question scientifically is hard: while there are many tracking companies that have enormous databases of fingerprints, they don’t share them with researchers.

Read full article: Against privacy defeatism: why browsers can still stop fingerprinting

Domain names and WHOIS information in a post-GDPR world

With the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) having taken effect across the EU on 25 May 2018, this has meant a big change to the availability of WHOIS data. Temporary arrangements are now in place so that the WHOIS system is still (in a much restricted form) available. This is as a result of the Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data (“Temporary Specification”) which came into effect on 25 May 2018 and applies to operators of gTLD registries and ICANN-accredited Registrars such as the likes of GoDaddy.

However, as can be seen from the information below, the critical information for those bringing domain name disputes, namely registrant contact information, is no longer publicly available and as things stand currently there is no uniform way of obtaining access to it.

Read full article: EUROPE: Domain names and WHOIS information in a post-GDPR world (gTLDs update)

Apple Just Made Safari the Good Privacy Browser

The newest version of Apple’s Safari comes with new privacy enhancing features. Browser will push back hard against the ad-tracking methods and device fingerprinting techniques that marketers and data brokers use to monitor web users as they browse.

The next version of Safari will explicitly prompt you when a website tries to access your cookies or other data, and let you decide whether to allow it, a welcome step toward explicit choices about online tracking. Safari will also make a dent in defeating the so-called “fingerprinting” approach, in which marketers use publicly accessible information about devices—like the way they’re configured, the fonts they have installed, and the plug-ins they run—to assign them an individual, trackable ID.

Source: WWDC 2018: Apple Just Made Safari the Good Privacy Browser | WIRED

Domain Names and GDPR

When the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) takes effect across the EU on 25 May 2018, large amounts of WHOIS data will no longer be publicly available. WHOIS has to date been a public register of contact information about people controlling domain names (and websites hosted at them), and so has been an important source of information about those who both own and infringe IP.

Source: Eu: Domain Names And Whois Information – Changes Afoot When The Gdpr Comes Into Force – Get Ready!

What Europe’s Tough New Data Law Means for You, and the Internet

The European Union is introducing some of the strictest online privacy rules in the world. The changes aim to give internet users more control over their information, but the long-term effects of the new law won’t be known for years.

Source: What Europe’s Tough New Data Law Means for You, and the Internet – The New York Times

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