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Tag Archives for " Israel "

A patent shows how surveillance drones could ID you from above

An Israeli biometrics startup with a history of defense contracts has applied for a patent on technology that repositions drones to get a better shot of a person on the ground.

The patent application, titled “Adaptive Positioning of Drones for Enhanced Face Recognition,” describes a computer vision system that analyzes the angle of a drone camera in relation to the face of a person on the ground, then instructs the drone on how to improve its vantage point. The system can then send that image through a machine-learning model trained to classify individual faces. The model sends back a classification with a probability score. If the probability score falls below a certain threshold, the whole process starts over again.

A future defined by this type of mass surveillance would “obliterate privacy and anonymity in public as we know it,” said Kade Crockford, head of the Technology for Liberty Program at the ACLU of Massachusetts.

Source: A patent shows how surveillance drones could ID you from above

Israel’s data-for-vaccines deal with Pfizer raises privacy concerns

Israel has struck a deal with Pfizer, promising to share vast troves of medical data with the international drug giant in exchange for the continued flow of its hard-to-get vaccine.

Proponents say the deal could allow Israel to become the first country to vaccinate most of its population, while providing valuable research that could help the rest of the world. But critics say the deal raises major ethical concerns, including possible privacy violations and a deepening of the global divide that enables wealthy countries to stockpile vaccines as poorer populations, including Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, have to wait longer to be inoculated.

Source: Israel’s data-for-vaccines deal with Pfizer raises privacy concerns | The Times of Israel

Israel introduces new contact-tracing bill

Throughout the COVID-19 global outbreak, Israel has taken a unique approach for fighting the pandemic.

While other countries have developed and implemented new technologies for contact tracing, Israel preferred using a covert technology, operated by the General Secret Service for anti-terror purposes.

Source: Israel introduces new contact-tracing bill

Israel Steps Back From Law Involving Secret Service in COVID-19 Tracing

Following widespread protest by the Israeli privacy community and the population at large, a decision by the Israeli Supreme Court and a statement from the head of the Israeli Secret Service that its involvement is not necessary given the current state of the pandemic—the Israeli cabinet has decided to withdraw a controversial law allowing monitoring of COVID-19 spread through invasive cellphone tracking by the Israeli Secret Service.

Source: Israel Steps Back From Law Involving Secret Service in COVID-19 Tracing

Israel restricts COVID-19 phone tracking to ‘special cases’

Israel’s cabinet has limited COVID-19 phone tracking to ‘special cases’ where normal methods might not be enough.

Officials initially wanted to track the location of virtually every infected person with the technology, which was originally intended to fight terrorism. It theoretically helped Israel determine if people were isolating properly, and would help determine who might have been exposed. Privacy advocates quickly objected, though, and the Israeli parliament put a stop to it after determining that the drawbacks outweighed the benefits.

Source: Israel restricts COVID-19 phone tracking to ‘special cases’ | Engadget

Will the GDPR violate Israeli sovereignty?

Privacy professionals are repeatedly struggling with understanding the potential global reach of the EU General Data Protection Regulation. Here is one example of just how far it could go.

In June 2016, Israel’s Ministry of Tourism initiated an online campaign called “Two Cities – One Break.” It was designed to promote Israel’s two main cities, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, to Europeans as a vacation destination.

Source: Will the GDPR violate Israeli sovereignty?

Israeli tech firm undercuts facial recognition to bolster privacy

Riding the wave of a global push to comply with new privacy standards, a small Israeli company believes it can help you, and your face, stay anonymous in a hyper-connected world. The startup, called D-ID, says it has developed a “firewall” to block facial recognition, the ubiquitous technology that can now unlock smartphones, tag friends on Facebook, or help police pick out an individual hiding in a crowd.

Source: Israeli tech firm undercuts facial recognition to bolster privacy

2018 global legislative predictions in privacy

Taking a look at the activities of 2017, it’s clear that the coming year will see lots of movement on the privacy front. This week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup consists of contributions from around the globe on expected and potential legislation. With more than 20 entries coming in from countries and regions spanning Argentina to Zimbabwe, hopefully we’ve hit on some important upcoming developments you should have on your radar.

Source: 2018 global legislative predictions

Israeli DPA guidelines on workplace surveillance

On Oct. 17, Israel’s data protection authority, which recently changed its name to the Privacy Protection Authority (formerly the ILITA), published guidelines on the use of surveillance cameras in the workplace and in the framework of an employment relationship. The new guidelines constitute supplementary materials to previous guidelines on the more general issue of privacy consideration in the use of surveillance cameras.

Source: Israeli DPA guidelines on workplace surveillance

Israeli DPA publishes guidelines on workplace surveillance

On Oct. 17, Israel’s data protection authority, which recently changed its name to the Privacy Protection Authority (formerly the ILITA), published guidelines on the use of surveillance cameras in the work place and in the framework of an employment relationship.

Source: Israeli DPA guidelines on workplace surveillance

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