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Tag Archives for " Japan "

Five Eyes governments, India, and Japan make new call for encryption backdoors

Members of the intelligence-sharing alliance Five Eyes, along with government representatives for Japan and India, have published a statement over the weekend calling on tech companies to come up with a solution for law enforcement to access end-to-end encrypted communications.

The statement is the alliance’s latest effort to get tech companies to agree to encryption backdoors.

The Five Eyes alliance, comprised of the US, the UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, have made similar calls to tech giants in 2018 and 2019, respectively.

Source: Five Eyes governments, India, and Japan make new call for encryption backdoors | ZDNet

Japan’s police introduce facial recognition system in criminal probes

About 10 million facial images are currently stored in the agency’s database, including those of suspects referred to prosecutors who have not been arrested.

Japanese police have been using a system that can match photos of people who have been previously arrested with images gathered by surveillance cameras and social media, police officials said Saturday, a move that could raise concerns about privacy violations.

The facial analysis system has been operated by police across the nation since March to identify criminal suspects more quickly and accurately, the officials said. But critics warn that the system could turn the country into a surveillance society unless it is operated under strict rules.

Source: Japan’s police introduce facial recognition system in criminal probes | The Japan Times

Japan enacts Act on the Protection of Personal Information

On June 5, the law amending the Act on the Protection of Personal Information was enacted.

After the Cabinet order and rules of the Personal Information Protection Commission regarding the amendments are made, the new law is expected to take effect in the first half of 2022 or last quarter of 2021, although it is not clear exactly when.

Source: Japan enacts Act on the Protection of Personal Information

Japan considers applying domestic privacy rules to global tech giants

A communications ministry panel says Japan should consider a legal revision so it can impose “secrecy of communications” rules on overseas-based technology giants such as Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon.com.

The panel of experts released the finding Monday in a draft list of issues related to applying domestic privacy protection rules to global information technology giants.

Source: Japan considers applying domestic privacy rules to global tech giants | The Japan Times

Japan superfans lose fight for 1966 Beatles tour footage

Group of Japanese Beatles fans have lost their bid to get police to hand over historic footage of the band’s 1966 Japan visit.The superfans took their battle for the film — recorded by police as a security measure — all the way to the Supreme Court, arguing it was a “historical document.”

Police had offered to release the footage, reportedly about 35 minutes long, but only after blurring the faces of everyone in the film except the Beatles, citing privacy reasons. Two lower courts backed the police against a group of citizens from Nagoya who wanted the entire film released uncensored, saying it would be almost impossible to identify people in the footage more than 50 years later. But the long and winding legal battle ended last week when the Supreme Court rejected their argument, the group announced.

Source: Don’t let me down: Japan superfans lose fight for 1966 Beatles tour footage | The Japan Times

EU Begins Formal Approval for Japan Adequacy Decision

On September 5, 2018, the European Commission announced in a press release the launch of the procedure to formally adopt the Commission’s adequacy decision with respect to Japan. The press release notes that the EU-Japan talks on personal data protection were completed in July 2018, and announces the publication of the draft adequacy decision and related documents which, among other things, set forth the additional safeguards Japan will accord EU personal data that is transferred to Japan.

Source: EU Begins Formal Approval for Japan Adequacy Decision

EU and Japan agreed to create the world’s largest area of safe data flows

On July 17 the EU and Japan successfully concluded their talks on reciprocal adequacy. They agreed to recognise each other’s data protection systems as ‘equivalent’, which will allow data to flow safely between the EU and Japan. Each side will now launch its relevant internal procedures for the adoption of its adequacy finding.

Source: European Commission – PRESS RELEASES – Press release – The European Union and Japan agreed to create the world’s largest area of safe data flows

EU approaching adequacy deals with Japan and Korea

The EU is currently finalising a trade agreement with Japan – a process that began in March 2015. Since then, data protection concerns have gained currency in the EU and efforts are now made to ensure that future trade deals will go hand-in-hand with sufficient protection. Japan’s law requires Japan to also find the EU’s data protection regime “adequate.”

Source: EU approaching adequacy deals with Japan, Korea

Significant developments on adequacy findings between Japan and Europe

On 25 April 2018, Japan’s data protection authority published draft guidelines relating to adequacy findings for international personal data transfers from Europe to Japan (Guidelines).

If the Guidelines come into force in their current form, they will allow for personal data to be transferred from the EEA (which includes the EU, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) to Japan without measures such as specific data subject consent or standard contractual clauses.

Source: Data Protection – Significant developments on adequacy findings between Japan and Europe

2018 global legislative predictions in privacy

Taking a look at the activities of 2017, it’s clear that the coming year will see lots of movement on the privacy front. This week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup consists of contributions from around the globe on expected and potential legislation. With more than 20 entries coming in from countries and regions spanning Argentina to Zimbabwe, hopefully we’ve hit on some important upcoming developments you should have on your radar.

Source: 2018 global legislative predictions

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