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Tag Archives for " law enforcement "

The NYDFS Brings First Enforcement Action under the Cybersecurity Regulation

On Tuesday, July 21, 2020, the New York Department of Financial Services (NYDFS) brought its first enforcement action under its Cybersecurity Regulation against a large title insurer for failing to protect sensitive personal information.

The NYDFS is seeking civil monetary penalties, an order requiring the Company to remedy the alleged violations, and any other relief deemed just and appropriate.

Source: The NYDFS Brings First Enforcement Action under the Cybersecurity Regulation

Police take too much data from victims’ phones, says watchdog

Police are extracting “excessive amounts of personal data” from the mobile phones of victims and witnesses during investigations and are in danger of discouraging the public from reporting crime, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has warned.

In a critical study of data extraction policies, the ICO concludes that procedures are inconsistent across forces in England and Wales and calls for a new statutory code of practice to provide “greater clarity”.

Source: Police take too much data from victims’ phones, says watchdog | Police | The Guardian

Police Are Buying Access to Hacked Website Data

Hackers break into websites, steal information, and then publish that data all the time, with other hackers or scammers then using it for their own ends. But breached data now has another customer: law enforcement.

Some companies are selling government agencies access to data stolen from websites in the hope that it can generate investigative leads, with the data including passwords, email addresses, IP addresses, and more.

Source: Police Are Buying Access to Hacked Website Data

Many Police Departments Have Software That Can Identify People In Crowds

BriefCam, a facial recognition and surveillance video analysis company, sells the ability to surveil protesters and enforce social distancing — without the public knowing.

BriefCam shows the line between contact tracing, policing, and surveillance can be thin — as cities can spend tens of thousands of dollars for powerful technology, with few restrictions on how police can use it.

Source: Many Police Departments Have Software That Can Identify People In Crowds

It’s unconstitutional for cops to force phone unlocking, court rules

Indiana’s Supreme Court has ruled that the Fifth Amendment allows a woman accused of stalking to refuse to unlock her iPhone.

The court held that the Fifth Amendment’s rule against self-incrimination protected Katelin Seo from giving the police access to potentially incriminating data on her phone. The courts are divided on how to apply the Fifth Amendment in this kind of case.

Source: It’s unconstitutional for cops to force phone unlocking, court rules | Ars Technica

Wrongfully Accused by an Algorithm

In what may be the first known case of its kind, a faulty facial recognition match led to a Michigan man’s arrest for a crime he did not commit.

Mr. Williams’s case combines flawed technology with poor police work, illustrating how facial recognition can go awry.

Full article: Wrongfully Accused by an Algorithm – The New York Times

iPhone spyware lets police log suspects’ passcodes when cracking doesn’t work

A tool, previously unknown to the public, doesn’t have to crack the code that people use to unlock their phones. It just has to log the code as the user types it in.

The spyware has been available for about a year but this is the first time details of its existence have been reported, in part because of the non-disclosure agreements police departments sign when they buy a device from Grayshift known as GrayKey.

Source: iPhone spyware lets police log suspects’ passcodes when cracking doesn’t work

Geofence warrants: How police can use protesters’ phones against them

Rather than seeking warrants for a person backed up with probable cause, police have begun relying on geofence warrants that sweep up information on any device that happened to be in the vicinity of a crime.

Using these wide-ranging data requests, police often get information from companies like Google, collecting data on people who were in the area and almost all of whom are innocent. Police have used the tactic for serious cases like murder investigations, as well as nonviolent property crimes like burglaries.

Source: Geofence warrants: How police can use protesters’ phones against them – CNET

Amazon Bans Police Use of Its Face Recognition for a Year

Amazon on Wednesday banned police use of its face-recognition technology for a year, making it the latest tech giant to step back from law-enforcement use of systems that have been criticized for incorrectly identifying people with darker skin.

Amazon said it will still allow organizations such as the International Center for Missing and Exploited Children to use the technology.

Source: Amazon Bans Police Use of Its Face Recognition for a Year | Time

Police body cameras at protests raise privacy concerns

They were supposed to add accountability to the police. But critics say they’re backfiring and could cause a chilling effect on free speech at protests.

Protesters have long been worried about surveillance at demonstrations, the latest twist being police use of technology like facial recognition and social media monitoring to identify people in crowds. Using body cameras as surveillance tools at protests threaten people’s privacy and could have a chilling effect on free speech.

Full article: Police body cameras at protests raise privacy concerns – CNET

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