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Tag Archives for " law enforcement "

London police to deploy live facial recognition cameras

The Metropolitan police has announced that it will begin the operational use of Live Facial Recognition (LFR) technology.

The cameras will be linked to a database of suspects, to which if the system detects someone an alert is generated, and ff the system detects someone who is not on the database their information will not be saved.

Source: #Privacy: Metropolitan police to deploy facial recognition cameras

Australian government secretly releasing sensitive medical records to police

The Australian government is releasing highly sensitive medical records to police through a secret regime that experts say contains fundamentally flawed privacy protections.

The Department of Human Services fields large volumes of requests for Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) data from state and federal policing agencies each year.

Source: Australian government secretly releasing sensitive medical records to police

EDPS investigates European Parliament’s 2019 election activities and takes enforcement actions

The European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) is carrying out an investigation into the European Parliament’s use of a US-based political campaigning company to process personal data as part of its activities relating to the 2019 EU parliamentary election.

The EDPS is actively engaged in seeking solutions to the challenges of online manipulation in elections. Data protection plays a fundamental role in ensuring electoral integrity and must therefore be treated as a priority in the planning of any election campaign.

Source: EDPS investigates European Parliament’s 2019 election activities and takes enforcement actions | European Data Protection Supervisor

Lawmakers introduce bill to help police access digital evidence during investigations 

Rep. Val Demings (D-Fla.) on Friday introduced bipartisan legislation to help police officers learn how to access digital evidence, including data and online messages, during investigations.

The Technology in Criminal Justice Act would create a new office at the Department of Justice to educate state and local law enforcement agencies about how to sift through digital evidence — on phones and computers — in a way that does not flout the law. The legislation would also create a federal center to serve as a central clearinghouse providing training, tech expertise and legal assistance on gathering digital evidence.

Source: Lawmakers introduce bill to help police access digital evidence during investigations | TheHill

US court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptops

A federal court in Boston has ruled that warrantless U.S. government searches of the phones and laptops of international travelers at airports and other U.S. ports of entry violate the Fourth Amendment.

Tuesday’s ruling in U.S. District Court came in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation on behalf of 11 travelers whose smartphones and laptops were searched without individualized suspicion at U.S. ports of entry.

Source: Court rules against warrantless searches of phones, laptops

EU and US work on electronic evidence agreement

European Commission and U.S. Department of Justice officials met on September 25 to begin formal negotiations on an EU-U.S. agreement to facilitate access to electronic evidence in criminal investigations.

There was agreement to regular negotiating rounds with the view to concluding an agreement as quickly as possible. Progress will be reviewed at the next EU-U.S. Justice and Home Affairs Ministerial in December.

Source: European Commission – PRESS RELEASES – Press release – Criminal justice: Joint statement on the launch of EU-U.S. negotiations to facilitate access to electronic evidence

UK Court Dismisses Challenge to Police Use of Facial Recognition Technology

On September 4, 2019, the High Court of England and Wales dismissed a challenge to South Wales Police’s use of Automated Facial Recognition technology. The Court determined that the police’s use of AFR had been necessary and proportionate to achieve their statutory obligations.

The police would subsequently match the images captured with wanted persons in their own databases using biometric data analysis. Where a match was not made with any of these watchlists, the images were immediately and automatically deleted.

Source: High Court Dismisses Challenge to Police Use of Facial Recognition Technology

EU-US launch talks on e-evidence access

EU member states have approved a mandate for the European Commission to launch international negotiations with the U.S. to speed and streamline cross-border access to electronic evidence in criminal investigations.

EU Commission Spokesperson Christian Wigand said the new legislation and getting agreement with the U.S. is incredibly important because e-evidence “is needed in around 85% of criminal investigations, and in two-thirds of these investigations there is a need to obtain evidence from online service providers based in another jurisdiction.”

Full article: EU-US launch talks on e-evidence access

FBI proposal outlines plans for large-scale collection of social media data

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is planning to step up its efforts to monitor social media platforms more aggressively in order to detect potential threats.

The law enforcement agency is said to be seeking technological solutions from third-party contractors that would make it possible to harvest publicly-available information en masse from Facebook, Twitter, and other social media platforms.

Source: FBI proposal outlines plans for large-scale collection of social media data

Amazon’s Ring Is a Perfect Storm of Privacy Threats

Recent reports show that Ring has partnered with police departments across the country to hawk this new surveillance system—going so far as to draft press statements and social media posts for police to promote Ring cameras.

This creates a vicious cycle in which police promote the adoption of Ring, Ring terrifies people into thinking their homes are in danger, and then Amazon sells more cameras.

Source: Amazon’s Ring Is a Perfect Storm of Privacy Threats | Electronic Frontier Foundation

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