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Tag Archives for " law enforcement "

Your ‘smart home’ is watching – and possibly sharing your data with the police

Smart-home devices like thermostats and fridges may be too smart for comfort – especially in a country with few laws preventing the sale of digital data to third parties.

This problem stems from the US government buying data from private companies, a practice increasingly unearthed in media investigations though still quite shrouded in secrecy. It’s relatively simple in a country like the United States without strong privacy laws: approach a third-party firm that sells databases of information on citizens, pay them for it and then use the data however deemed fit.

Full article: Your ‘smart home’ is watching – and possibly sharing your data with the police | Technology | The Guardian

UK may force Facebook services to allow backdoor police access

UK Ministers are considering forcing Facebook to implement a backdoor to allow security agencies and police to read the contents of messages sent across its Messenger, WhatsApp and Instagram chat services.

“End-to-end encryption poses an unacceptable risk to user safety and society. It would prevent any access to messaging content and severely erode tech companies’ ability to tackle the most serious illegal content on their own platforms, including child abuse and terrorism,” they said.

Source: UK may force Facebook services to allow backdoor police access | Technology | The Guardian

ICE Investigators Use Private Database Covering Millions of Individuals to Pursue Immigration Violations

United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers have bought private data containing millions of individuals’ phone, water, electricity, and other utility records.

ICE will use these records to pursue immigration violations. ICE’s use of this private data shows how government agencies exploit commercial data to gain access to information that they are not to compile themselves.

Source: ICE Investigators Using Private Database

UK to introduce new laws and a code of practice for police wanting to rifle through mobile phone messages

A new UK law will explicitly authorise the “voluntary” slurping of data from mobile phones of crime suspects and witnesses.

The Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, which was introduced to Parliament this week, contains clauses that will allow police and others to extract data from mobile phones if the user “voluntarily” hands the device over.cA legally binding code of practice will also be introduced.

It appears that the proposed law is an effort to address campaigners by introducing some easy-to-meet procedural requirements.

Source: UK to introduce new laws and a code of practice for police wanting to rifle through mobile phone messages • The Register

Digidog, a Robotic Dog Used by the Police, Stirs Privacy Concerns

The New York Police Department has been testing Digidog, which it says can be deployed in dangerous situations and keep officers safer, but some fear it could become an aggressive surveillance tool.

The police said the robot can see in the dark and assess how safe it is for officers to enter an apartment or building where there may be a threat.

Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst with the American Civil Liberties Union, said empowering a robot to do police work could have implications for bias, mobile surveillance, hacking and privacy. There is also concern that the robot could be paired with other technology and be weaponized.

Source: Digidog, a Robotic Dog Used by the Police, Stirs Privacy Concerns – The New York Times

CJEU fines Spain €15 million for failure to implement Data Protection Law Enforcement Directive

The Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) ordered Spain to pay the European Commission 15.5 million euros and a potential daily fine thereafter for failing to transpose the Data Protection Law Enforcement Directive (Directive (EU) 2016/680).

On top of the €15 million fine Spain will have to pay a daily penalty payment of € 89 000 for each day of delay on transposition following the CJEU’s judgment.

Source: CJEU press release

Swedish Police unlawfully used facial recognition app, says Privacy Watchdog

Upon news in the media of the Swedish Police Authority using the application Clearview AI for facial recognition the Swedish Authority for Privacy Protection (IMY) initiated an investigation against the Police.

The investigation concludes that Cleaview AI has been used by the Police on a number of occasions. According to the Police a few employees have used the application without any prior authorisation.

IMY imposed an administrative fine of SEK 2,500,000 (approximately EUR 250,000) on the Police Authority for infringements of the Criminal Data Act. IMY also ordered the Police to conduct further training and education of its employees in order to avoid any future processing of personal data in breach of data protection rules and regulations.

Source: Police unlawfully used facial recognition app – Integritetsskyddsmyndigheten

New EFF Report Shows Cops Used Ring Cameras to Monitor Black Lives Matter Protests

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has obtained emails that show that the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) sent at least one request—and likely many more—for Amazon Ring camera video of last summer’s Black-led protests against police violence.

In a report released yesterday, EFF shows that the LAPD asked for video related to “the recent protests,” and refused to disclose to EFF what crime it was investigating or how many hours of footage it ultimately requested.

Source: New EFF Report Shows Cops Used Ring Cameras to Monitor Black Lives Matter Protests | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Minneapolis prohibits use of facial recognition software by its police department

The Minneapolis City Council voted unanimously to approve an ordinance banning the use of facial recognition software by its police department and other city agencies. The ban adds Minneapolis to the list of US cities moving to limit or end the use of such technology by its law enforcement officers and city employees.

But Minneapolis police chief Medaria Arradondo said in a statement that the ban was created without feedback from him, and that he believes it’s possible for facial recognition technology to be “utilized in accordance with data privacy and other citizen legal protections,” according to the Star Tribune. Facial recognition software has been found to have age, race, and ethnic biases, and privacy advocates have raised concerns about its use by law enforcement. Minneapolis’ ordinance created an appeals process allowing city agencies to request exemptions under some circumstances.

Source: Minneapolis prohibits use of facial recognition software by its police department – The Verge

Google challenges French data watchdog’s €100 million fine in court

France’s administrative court known as the Council of State considered on Thursday an application for interim measures filed by Google LLC and Google Ireland after the French Data Protection Authority known as the CNIL fined the digital giant €100 million last December for its cookie collection policy.

In its deliberation of 7 December 2020, the French data protection authority (CNIL) accused the US giant, whose European headquarters are based in Dublin, of contravening the law on information technology, files, and freedoms.

For its part, Google has appealed to the one-stop-shop mechanism provided for in the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which, in its view, requires it to report on data protection matters only to the corresponding authority in the country in which it is based, namely Ireland.

Source: Google challenges French data watchdog’s €100 million fine in court – EURACTIV.com

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