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Facial recognition technology to be used in London streets

Retail zones and shops in the UK capital are guaranteed to be bustling with consumers seeking out presents this Yuletide period. But central London shoppers themselves may also be getting picked out by new facial recognition technology implemented by Metropolitan police.

Source: Facial recognition technology to be used in London streets

Australia’s horrific new encryption law likely to obliterate its tech scene

Australia‘s government signed a bill into law last week giving law enforcement agencies the right to force technology companies to reveal users’ encrypted messages. Another way of putting it: Australia‘s tech scene will soon be located on the Wayback Machine.

The law was introduced as the Telecommunications and Other Legislation Amendment (Assistance and Access) Bill 2018, but now it’s official. And there’s a lot to be concerned about, even if you don’t live or work in Australia.

Full article: Australia’s horrific new encryption law likely to obliterate its tech scene

UK police ‘gang matrix’ breached data laws

The Metropolitan police’s list of gang suspects breached data protection laws, potentially causing damage and distress to a disproportionate number of young black men, an investigation by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has found.

The list, called the gangs violence matrix, has also been criticised by human rights campaigners, who say it racialises the war on gangs and stigmatises black youngsters.

Source: Met’s ‘gang matrix’ breached data laws, investigation finds

Amazon is at the center of a debate over public safety versus privacy

As more devices such as voice assistants, home security cameras, appliances and even doorbells come online, the trove of intimate data that technology companies hold is increasing exponentially. People are voluntarily bringing in devices that record their conversations, track their heart rates, and comings-and-goings — all of which produces more intimate and real-time potential evidence that law enforcement might want to help solve crimes.

Full article: The Cybersecurity 202: Amazon is now at the center of a debate over public safety versus privacy – The Washington Post

Microsoft to comply with the data localisation requests from all countries

Microsoft is committed to complying with the law of the land when it comes to data privacy and will honour data localisation requests from all countries, including India.

“We will have to comply with data laws of various countries. That is mandatory for us. We are already fully compliant with the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and will do the same with other countries’ data protection laws,” Ann Johnson, Corporate Vice President, Cybersecurity Solutions Group at Microsoft, told IANS.

As the tech companies demand data to flow freely, Johnson said in order to improve current security and intelligent systems against cybercriminals who are well funded, certain sets of data have to move freely among the countries.

Source: Microsoft to comply with the data localisation requests from all countries- Technology News, Firstpost

Police access to personal data retained by ISPs is a matter of proportionality

On October 2nd 2018, the Court of Justice of European Union (CJEU) held a decision confirming the conditions of access to personal data retained by providers of electronic communications services by the police in the context of a criminal investigation. CJEU concluded that as the interference that the access to personal data entails is deemed not serious, access to such data can be justified by the objective of preventing, investigating, detecting and prosecuting ‘criminal offences’ generally, without it being necessary that those criminal offences to which it relates be ‘serious’.

Full article: Eu: Access By The Police To Personal Data Retained By Providers Of Electronic Communications Services – A Matter Of Proportionality!

Fitbit data leads to arrest of 90-year-old in stepdaughter’s murder

on Saturday, September 8th, at 3:20 pm, Karen Navarra’s Fitbit recorded her heart rate spiking. Within 8 minutes, the 67-year-old California woman’s heart beat rapidly slowed. At 3:28 pm, her heart rate ceased to register at all. She was dead.

Two pieces of technology led police to charge Ms. Navarro’s stepfather, Anthony Aiello, with allegedly having murdered her. Besides the Fitbit records, there are also surveillance videos that refuted Aiello’s version of events.

Full article: Fitbit data leads to arrest of 90-year-old in stepdaughter’s murder – Naked Security

The Newest Password Technology Is Making Your Phone Easier for Police to Search

For the first time, police have compelled a suspect to unlock his phone using Face ID. The case reveals an interesting inversion: More advanced password technology is less protected from police seizure.

Full article: face-recognition-iphone-unlock-police-force – The Atlantic

EU Court Endorses Minor Privacy Intrusion for Petty Crime

On Tuesday, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Justice concluded that invasions of privacy are justified not just by the objective of fighting serious crime. “When the interference that such access entails is not serious, that access is capable of being justified by the objective of preventing, investigating, detecting and prosecuting ‘criminal offenses’ generally,” the ruling states.

As such, the ruling concludes, it would not unduly interfere with privacy rights to let police access “data for the purpose of identifying the owners of SIM cards activated with a stolen mobile telephone, such as the surnames, forenames and, if need be, addresses of the owners.” Such interference “is not sufficiently serious to entail that access being limited, in the area of prevention, investigation, detection and prosecution of criminal offenses, to the objective of fighting serious crime,” the ruling continues.

Source: EU Court Endorses Minor Privacy Intrusion for Petty Crime

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