Tag Archives for " law enforcement "

U.S. government seeks Facebook help to wiretap Messenger

The U.S. government is trying to force Facebook to break the encryption in its popular Messenger app so law enforcement may listen to a suspect’s voice conversations in a criminal probe, three people briefed on the case said, resurrecting the issue of whether companies can be compelled to alter their products to enable surveillance.

Source: Exclusive: U.S. government seeks Facebook help to wiretap Messenger – sources | Reuters

Australian Law Draft Requires Companies to share Encryption Data

The Australian government has proposed a new law that would force tech companies that have encrypted data relevant to an investigation to hand over the information they have stored when requested by law enforcement. Companies that don’t comply could face fines up to $7.3 million and people involved in not complying could face jail time.

Source: Proposed Australian Law Threatens Apple and Facebook’s Privacy Policies | Fortune

International Privacy Experts Adopt Recommendations for Cross-Border Law Enforcement Requests for Data

The International Working Group on Data Protection in Telecommunications has adopted new recommendations to protect individual rights during criminal cross-border law enforcement. The Berlin-based Working Group includes Data Protection Authorities and experts who assess emerging privacy challenges.

Source: International Privacy Experts Adopt Recommendations for Cross-Border Law Enforcement Requests for Data

Proposed UK surveillance laws give police power to access electronic devices

Proposed laws would also compel Facebook, Apple and Google to assist in decrypting private communications Law enforcement agencies would gain new powers to conduct covert surveillance on electronic devices and compel technology companies to assist in decrypting private communications under proposed legislation.

Source: Coalition’s surveillance laws give police power to access electronic devices

Facial recognition software is not ready for use by law enforcement

Facial recognition technologies, used in the identification of suspects, negatively affects people of color. To deny this fact would be a lie. And clearly, facial recognition-powered government surveillance is an extraordinary invasion of the privacy of all citizens — and a slippery slope to losing control of our identities altogether. There’s really no “nice” way to acknowledge these things.

Read article: Facial recognition software is not ready for use by law enforcement | TechCrunch

Apple to Close iPhone Security Hole That Law Enforcement Uses to Crack Devices

Apple is closing a technological loophole that let authorities hack into locked iPhones, infuriating law enforcement officials and reigniting a debate over security versus privacy.

Source: Apple to Close iPhone Security Hole That Law Enforcement Uses to Crack Devices – The New York Times

London cops’ facial recognition doesn’t work

London cops’ facial recognition kit has only correctly identified two people to date – neither of whom were criminals – and the UK capital’s police force has made no arrests using it. Police’s automated facial recognition (AFR) technology has a 98 per cent false positive rate.

Source: Zero arrests, 2 correct matches, no criminals: London cops’ facial recog tech slammed • The Register

UK’s police warns tech companies on use of encryption

The encryption technology that keeps smartphone users’ private messages safe could be regulated by the government because it is sometimes used by terrorists, the senior inspector overseeing the UK’s police forces has claimed.

Firms responsible for instant messaging apps are “making life easier for terrorists, paedophiles and organised criminals” while frustrating law enforcement by locking out the police, HM Chief Inspector of Constabulary said.

Source: Tech companies are bringing regulation on themselves by using encryption, warns UK’s top police watchdog | The Independent

The Next Frontier of Police Surveillance Is Drones

A major drone company DJI and a major police-camera company Axon are teaming up, and the possibilities are frightening. The devices will be linked to Axon’s cloud-based database for law enforcement, Evidence.com, which is used to process body-camera data too. And it could open a vast new frontier for police surveillance.

Source: Axon and DJI are teaming up to make surveillance drones, and the possibilities are frightening.

Justice ministers divided over proposal for police access to real-time data

National justice ministers are pushing to create new powers for law enforcement authorities to intercept communication data in real time as part of their criminal investigations.

But national governments and the European Parliament must agree on a compromise version of the legislation before it can go into effect—and the Commission is coming under pressure to carve out even more options for police to access data from tech firms.

Source: Justice ministers divided over proposal for police access to real-time data – EURACTIV.com

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