fbpx

Download free GDPR compliance checklist!

Tag Archives for " law enforcement "

UK police get access to people told to self-isolate

People who have been told to self-isolate through NHS test and trace could have their contact details passed to police, a move some fear could deter people from being tested for coronavirus.

Police forces will be able to access information about people “on a case-by-case” basis, so they can learn whether an individual has been told to self-isolate, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHCS) said.

Source: Police get access to people told to self-isolate by NHS test and trace

The Netherlands Is Becoming a Predictive Policing Hot Spot

A report released late last month by Amnesty International revealed that Dutch law enforcement have been engaged in a number of predictive-policing pilots and referred to the Netherlands as “one of the countries at the forefront of predictive policing in practice.”

The project is not only intrusive, the report claims, but discriminatory by design, since its aim is to fight “mobile banditry” (crimes like theft, pickpocketing, and drug trafficking), a term which explicitly excludes people of Dutch nationality and assumes that the offender is either of Eastern European origin or Romani, a minority ethnic group.

‘Predictive policing projects like these are explicitly biased and prejudiced and rely on data that is explicitly biased and prejudiced, but nobody does anything about it.’ says Amnesty International.

Source: The Netherlands Is Becoming a Predictive Policing Hot Spot

US Homeland Security collaring a suspected arsonist after asking Google for the IP addresses of folks who made a specific search

An unsealed warrant in a case involving alleged pedophile R&B star R. Kelly has shown how the Feds can get Google to hand over the details of people who make specific web search queries.

It raises a mild concern that if Uncle Sam’s request is too broad, and Google can’t or won’t resist the order, you could be swept up into an investigation simply by searching for the wrong thing at the wrong time. We note, though, that in this particular tale, the query was rather narrow, and Google insists it challenges overly broad warrants.

Source: Here’s US Homeland Security collaring a suspected arsonist after asking Google for the IP addresses of folks who made a specific search • The Register

Japan’s police introduce facial recognition system in criminal probes

About 10 million facial images are currently stored in the agency’s database, including those of suspects referred to prosecutors who have not been arrested.

Japanese police have been using a system that can match photos of people who have been previously arrested with images gathered by surveillance cameras and social media, police officials said Saturday, a move that could raise concerns about privacy violations.

The facial analysis system has been operated by police across the nation since March to identify criminal suspects more quickly and accurately, the officials said. But critics warn that the system could turn the country into a surveillance society unless it is operated under strict rules.

Source: Japan’s police introduce facial recognition system in criminal probes | The Japan Times

European Police Malware Could Harvest GPS, Messages, Passwords, More

The malware that French law enforcement deployed en masse onto Encrochat devices, a large encrypted phone network using Android phones, had the capability to harvest “all data stored within the device,” and was expected to include chat messages, geolocation data, usernames, passwords, and more.

As well as the geolocation, chat messages, and passwords, the law enforcement malware also told infected Encrochat devices to provide a list of WiFi access points near the device.

Organized crime groups across Europe and the rest of the world heavily used the network before its seizure, in many cases to facilitate large scale drug trafficking.

Source: European Police Malware Could Harvest GPS, Messages, Passwords, More

Doorbell Cameras Help to Spy on Police

Two leaked documents show how a monitoring tool used by police has been turned against them.

The rise of the internet-connected home security camera has generally been a boon to police, as owners of these devices can (and frequently do) share footage with cops at the touch of a button. But according to a leaked FBI bulletin, law enforcement has discovered an ironic downside to ubiquitous privatized surveillance: The cameras are alerting residents when police show up to conduct searches.

Source: Doorbell Cameras Like Ring Give Early Warning of Police Searches, FBI Warned

Police Want Your Smart Speaker—Here’s Why

Requests are rising from law enforcement for information on the devices, which can include internet queries, food orders, and overheard conversations.

When police and prosecutors collect smart home or speaker data, it’s typically used as evidence against suspects. Smart home devices and wearables have a growing role in police investigations.

Full article: Police Want Your Smart Speaker—Here’s Why | WIRED

UK Court Finds Unlawful Use of Automated Facial Recognition by Police

On August 11, 2020, the Court of Appeal of England and Wales overturned the High Court’s dismissal of a challenge to South Wales Police’s use of Automated Facial Recognition technology (AFR), finding that its use was unlawful and violated human rights.

In September 2019, the UK’s High Court had dismissed the challenge to the use of AFR, determining that its use was necessary and proportionate to achieve South Wales Police’s statutory obligations.

Source: UK Court of Appeal Finds Automated Facial Recognition Technology Unlawful in Bridges v South Wales Police

Documents Reveal What TikTok Shares with U.S. Authorities

Recently hacked police documents reveal the nature of the company’s relationship to law enforcement — not in China but in the United States.

Documents published in the BlueLeaks trove show the information that TikTok shared with U.S. law enforcement in dozens of cases. Experts familiar with law enforcement requests say that what TikTok collects and hands over is not significantly more than what companies like Amazon, Facebook, or Google regularly provide, but that’s because U.S. tech companies collect and hand over a lot of information.

Source: BlueLeaks Reveals What TikTok Shares with U.S. Authorities

The NYDFS Brings First Enforcement Action under the Cybersecurity Regulation

On Tuesday, July 21, 2020, the New York Department of Financial Services (NYDFS) brought its first enforcement action under its Cybersecurity Regulation against a large title insurer for failing to protect sensitive personal information.

The NYDFS is seeking civil monetary penalties, an order requiring the Company to remedy the alleged violations, and any other relief deemed just and appropriate.

Source: The NYDFS Brings First Enforcement Action under the Cybersecurity Regulation

1 2 3 13
>