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Tag Archives for " law enforcement "

Defining privacy in text messages -€ a step forward and maybe a step back

When the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms was enacted in 1982, the first text message was still a decade away. Nevertheless, the twelve words of Section 8 of the charter have proven to provide strong protection against warrantless access by the state to this pervasive form of communication.

Source: Defining privacy in text messages – A step forward and maybe a step back

Government requests for Facebook user data continue to increase worldwide

Facebook continues to see increased requests for user data from governments worldwide, according to its latest transparency report.

The social network first introduced the reports, which give raw figures on data requests and data granted, in 2013 to help increase visibility on government behavior. Facebook is limited on what information it can share, but sheer numbers show requests hit 78,890 in the first half of 2017, an increase of 33 percent year-on-year and 23 percent on the previous six-month period.

Source: Government requests for Facebook user data continue to increase worldwide | TechCrunch

UN privacy expert weighs in on landmark US Supreme Court case on jurisdiction over cloud data

The UN Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy has submitted independent expert advice to the US Supreme Court in a landmark case.

The court is to decide on the validity of a search warrant which requires Microsoft to hand over the entire contents of an email account housed in its data centre located in Ireland.

Source: OHCHR | UN privacy expert weighs in on landmark US Supreme Court case on jurisdiction over cloud data

Watching the watchmen: surveillance in 2017 and beyond

Have you ever assessed the many ways your government spies on you? A crucial government surveillance authority is up for reauthorization before December 31. We will talk about potential avenues for that reform and do “a surveillance year in review” with Michelle Richardson, Deputy Director of the Center for Democracy and Technology’s Freedom, Security, and Technology Project, Senior Fellow at GW’s Center for Cyber and Homeland Security.

Source: Have you ever assessed the many ways your government spies on you? A crucial government surveillance authority is up fo…

European Commission weighs in on Microsoft Ireland case

The European Commission has filed an amicus curiae brief on behalf of the European Union in the ongoing legal dispute between Microsoft Inc. and the United States. The case, which has been widely covered following Microsoft’€™s victory in the Second Circuit , concerns whether the United States can compel Microsoft to turn over information stored on a server owned by one of Microsoft’s EU subsidiaries and physically located in Ireland, via a warrant procured under the Stored Communications Act.

Source: European Commission weighs in on Microsoft Ireland case

Commission wants to extend law for police data access to the US

The European Commission hopes to set an international standard with its upcoming proposal to give police easier access to data from tech companies, and has already asked the United States to cooperate.

Source: Commission wants to extend law for police data access to the US – EURACTIV.com

NHS accused of breaching doctor-patient confidentiality for helping Home Office target foreigners

The Home Office is facing a legal challenge over claims NHS data-sharing violates patients’ right to privacy under the Human Rights Act. A memorandum of understanding published in January gave the Home Office access to confidential patient information to aid immigration enforcement. It was published without consultation with NHS staff, medical organisations or the public.

Source: NHS accused of breaching doctor-patient confidentiality for helping Home Office target foreigners | The Independent

Can Algorithms Send You to Prison? Apparently, Yes.

The New York Times reported in an opinion piece last week on a fascinating and disturbing story. In 2013, police officers in Wisconsin arrested Eric Loomis, who was driving a car that had been used in a recent shooting. He pleaded guilty to attempting to flee an officer, and no contest to operating a vehicle without the owner’s consent.

Source: Can Algorithms Send You to Prison? Apparently, Yes.

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