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Tag Archives for " law "

Two Bills Introduced to Restrict Microtargeting of Political Ads

Members of Congress have introduced two bills to restrict the microtargeting of online political advertisements.

The Banning Microtargeted Political Ads Act, sponsored by Rep. Anna Eshoo (CA-18), would prohibit online platforms from targeting ads at users on the basis of their personal data. The Protecting Democracy from Disinformation Act would restrict microtargeting of political ads based on demographic characteristics and personal data collected online.

Source: Two Bills Introduced to Restrict Microtargeting of Political Ads

California Privacy Compliance Obligations May Soon Change Under CPRA Ballot Initiative

The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) is progressing through California’s elections process for inclusion on the November 2020 ballot. Businesses may want to begin considering how their data privacy obligations in California may change if voters enact CPRA.

The CPRA is a ballot measure created by Californians for Consumer Privacy. It would significantly amend the CCPA. Substantive provisions of the CPRA would become effective on January 1, 2023.

Source: California Privacy Compliance Obligations May Soon Change Under CPRA Ballot Initiative

UK is lowering privacy standards, says EU officials

In his remarks following Round 3 of negotiations for a new partnership between the European Union and the United Kingdom Michel Barnier has pointed out that United Kingdom insists on lowering current standards and deviating from agreed mechanisms of data protection – “to the point that it is even asking the Union to ignore its own law and the jurisprudence of the European Court of Justice on passenger data (“PNR rules”)”.

Michel Barnier also notet that “The UK refuses to commit, in an agreement with us, to guarantees protecting fundamental rights and individual freedoms resulting from the European Convention on Human Rights, as agreed in the Political Declaration”.

Source: Remarks by Michel Barnier following Round 3 of negotiations for a new partnership between the European Union and the United Kingdom

Internet giants are fighting to protect your private browsing history

Earlier this month, the Senate passed the USA FREEDOM Reauthorization Act to reinstate the expired powers of the PATRIOT Act. Absent from the new bill is a crucial amendment that would require law enforcement to obtain a warrant before accessing private browsing data recorded by internet service providers. As it stands, the bill grants agencies like the FBI complete access to the internet history of all Americans.

Subsequently, several tech companies including Mozilla, Reddit, Twitter, and Patreon have co-signed a letter asking the House of Representatives to tidy up this mess. The House still needs to pass the bill for it to become law, and they can force the inclusion of the amendment. They vote this week.

Source: Internet giants are fighting to protect your private browsing history – TechSpot

Australia Tightens Privacy Protections on COVID-19 Tracing App

New legislation imposes stronger privacy protections on Australia’s planned contact-tracing app. “The Australian government’s coronavirus tracing app will have stronger privacy protections under legislation which has passed Parliament,” reports The New Daily.

The legislation was passed amid concerns about the government’s reluctance to be honest about the limitations of the app. It will put strict requirements on the collection, use and disclosure of COVIDSafe app data.

Source: Australia Tightens Privacy Protections on COVID-19 Tracing App

Senate Votes to Allow FBI to Look at Your Web Browsing History Without a Warrant

The government just got even more power to spy on your internet habits as millions remain quarantined at home.

The US Senate has voted to give law enforcement agencies access to web browsing data without a warrant, dramatically expanding the government’s surveillance powers in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The power grab was led by Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell as part of a reauthorization of the Patriot Act, which gives federal agencies broad domestic surveillance powers.

Source: Senate Votes to Allow FBI to Look at Your Web Browsing History Without a Warrant – VICE

Democrats introduce bill to protect data collected in coronavirus pandemic

Democratic lawmakers from both chambers yesterday introduced legislation to place limits on how tech companies and public health agencies use smartphones and other digital tools to track the spread of the coronavirus.

The bill would apply to a recent flood of Silicon Valley technologies coming to market amid the pandemic. The bill would require Americans to consent to participate in these efforts, and it would prohibit any data collected to address the health crisis from being used for other purposes such as advertising.

Source: The Technology 202: Democrats introduce bill to protect data collected in coronavirus pandemic – The Washington Post

Austrian ministry could face GDPR penalty after publishing personal data online

Austrians’ personal data has been publicly accessible on the Ministry of Economy’s website since 2009. One could simply go to the website, enter a name in the search field and find a person’s address and date of birth, as well as the date of tax returns.

The liberal party NEOS and NGO epicenter.works call it the “biggest data protection scandal of the Second Republic.” NEOS is considering legal action and a GDPR expert thinks it could be successful.

Source: Austrian ministry could face GDPR penalty after publishing personal data online – EURACTIV.com

CNIL Updates Data Protection Guidance for Employers in the Context of Lifting COVID-19 Containment Measures

On May 7, 2020, the French Data Protection Authority updated its previous guidance for employers relating to the processing of employee and visitor personal data in the context of the COVID-19 outbreak, in particular, in the context of lifting containment measures.

Some employers may consider implementing systematic body temperature checks at the entrance to their premises. Similarly, employers may wish to assess employees’ exposure to the virus or their health statuses when they return to work. The Updated Guidance analyzes some of these practices and outlines the principles applicable to data processing activities.

Source: CNIL Updates Data Protection Guidance for Employers in the Context of Lifting COVID-19 Containment Measures | Privacy & Information Security Law Blog

Washington, D.C. Adds Security Requirements in New Data Breach Notification Law

Washington, D.C. amended its data breach notification law (D.C. Act 23-268) on March 26, 2020, expanding the definition of personal information covered by the law and requiring businesses collecting data from D.C. residents to implement “reasonable security safeguards.”

Because D.C. law already provides a private right of action for violations of the data breach law, the updates will enable lawsuits in the event that an entity fails to meet the “reasonable security” standard—though recovery is limited to actual damages.

Source: Washington, D.C. Adds Security Requirements in New Data Breach Notification Law | Privacy & Security Law Blog | Davis Wright Tremaine

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