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Tag Archives for " law "

EU Commission looks for feedback on GDPR

The European Commission will report on the application of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) later this year. In accordance with Article 97 of the GDPR Commission is obliged to provide the report two years after its entry into application.

Commission opened for feedback its roadmap on the report on the application of the GDPR. Feedback will be taken into account for further development and fine tuning of the initiative.

You can provide feedback until 29 April 2020.

Source: Report on the application of the General Data Protection Regulation

Armenia amends law to allow tracking of infected

The National Assembly of the Republic of Armenia on 31 March, 2020 passed amendments to the Law on Legal Regime of the State of Emergency and to the Law on Electronic Communication as a response to the current COVID-19 (‘Coronavirus’) pandemic.

Amendments in the Law on Electronic Communication will allow the tracking of individuals infected with the Coronavirus through smart phones and technical means.

Source: National Assembly of the Republic of Armenia | Official Web Site | parliament.am

Washington Enacts New Facial Recognition Law

On March 31st , Washington Governor Jay Inslee signed into law SB 6280, a bill aimed at regulating state and local government agencies’ use of facial recognition services.

Governor Inslee vetoed Section 10 of the bill, which aimed to establish a legislative task force that would study and provide recommendations regarding various issues related to facial recognition services (including “potential abuses and threats posed by the use of facial recognition services” and the “quality, accuracy, and efficacy” of a particular facial recognition service).

Source: Washington Enacts New Facial Recognition Law

Lawmakers Leave Washington Without Renewing Expired Surveillance Powers

House lawmakers left town Friday after passing a roughly $2 trillion dollar coronavirus relief package without voting to renew a set of intelligence powers that expired earlier this month, meaning surveillance tools used by the FBI to pursue terrorism suspects will likely remain defunct for at least several more weeks.

The surveillance powers, originally enacted after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks have lapsed before due to congressional inaction, but only for about a day. They expired on March 15.

Source: Lawmakers Leave Washington Without Renewing Expired Surveillance Powers – WSJ

Amendments to the German Infection Protection Act interfere with privacy

On 23 March 2020 the Federal Cabinet adopted the Amendments to the Infection Protection Act, as proposed by the Federal Ministry of Health (BMG) which include measures that aim to slow down the infection rate of COVID-19 (‘Coronavirus’) and have an impact on the right to privacy.

The Federal Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information (‘BfDI’), Ulrich Kelber, criticised some of the Amendments as potentially excessive and not proven to be effective. In particular, the BfDI highlights that the Amendments contain extensive record obligations for the transport sector, and also lack the obligation to delete personal data recorded during the health crisis afterwards.

Source: Germany: Amendments to the Infection Protection Act interfere with “right to privacy quite significantly” | DataGuidance

UK to pass Emergency bill: what’s in it?

The new bill giving ministers unprecedented powers is set to become law after clearing the House of Lords.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock told MPs the emergency legislation will allow “extraordinary measures” never seen in peace time in the UK. Mr Hancock has stressed that the powers in the bill would only be used “when strictly necessary” and would remain in force only for as long as required to respond to the crisis.

Read full article: Coronavirus: What’s in the emergency legislation? – BBC News

USA: Senator introduces comprehensive federal data privacy bill

U.S. Senator, Jerry Moran, announced, on 12 March 2020, that he had introduced a bill for the Consumer Data Privacy and Security Act of 2020.

The Bill aims to establish a clear federal standard for data privacy protection, giving businesses a uniform standard rather than a patchwork of state laws, as it would expressly pre-empt any provision of a law, rule, regulation, or other requirement of any state or locality to the extent that such provision relates to the privacy or security of personal data.

Source: USA: Senator introduces comprehensive federal data privacy bill

Study reveals the global impact of GDPR

With the introduction in May 2018 of the European Union’s (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), 2019 was expected to be the year of enforcement, with regulators using extended powers to set a higher bar for managing individuals’ data.

The latest Beazley Breach Insights report analyses the actions of data protection regulators across the EU in 2019 and the impact on organizations based elsewhere that are nonetheless subject to the rules through their business structure or customer base.

Source: #Privacy: Study reveals the global impact of GDPR – PrivSec Report

Proposed US law is “Trojan horse” to stop online encryption, critics say

Child-exploitation bill could dissuade companies from using end-to-end encryption.

Two Republicans and two Democrats in the US Senate have proposed a law that aims to combat sexual exploitation of children online, but critics of the bill call it a “Trojan horse” that could harm Americans’ security by reducing access to encryption.

The EARN IT (Eliminating Abusive and Rampant Neglect of Interactive Technologies) Act “would create incentives for companies to ‘earn’ liability protection for violations of laws related to online child sexual abuse material,” an announcement by the bill’s supporters said.

Source: Proposed US law is “Trojan horse” to stop online encryption, critics say | Ars Technica

Washington state approves stronger facial recognition regulations

Washington officials have approved a set of stronger facial recognition regulations for the state.

Under the bill, facial recognition technologies have to be tested for fairness and accuracy, since they’ve been proven to show bias against women and people of color. Law enforcement agencies would have to secure a court order or a warrant to be able to use them, and Washington state has to form a task force to study how public agencies should use and deploy facial recognition technologies.

Source: Washington state approves stronger facial recognition regulations | Engadget

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