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Tag Archives for " law "

Lawmakers introduce bill to restrict NSA surveillance

A bipartisan coalition of US lawmakers have introduced a new bill that would protect Americans’ rights against unnecessary government surveillance.

The Safeguarding Americans’ Private Records Act, introduced by US Senator Roy Wyden, D-Ore, will reform section 215 of the PATRIOT Act and prevent abuses of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

Source: #Privacy: Lawmakers introduce bill to restrict NSA surveillance

Like CCPA, But Make it Virginia: States Scramble to Introduce Data Privacy Legislation of Their Own

With companies still scrambling to comply with the newly effective California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), other states continue to introduce data privacy legislation of their own.

Virginia added itself to the ever-growing list of states considering such bills when the Virginia Privacy Act (VPA) was introduced to the General Assembly for consideration January 8. The VPA combines the CCPA’s notice requirements with consumer rights similar to those found in the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Source: Like CCPA, But Make it Virginia: States Scramble to Introduce Data Privacy Legislation of Their Own | News & Knowledge | Adams and Reese LLP

Croatian Presidency tempers expectations on ePrivacy progress

The Croatian Presidency of the Council of the European Union is the just the latest EU presidency to try to tackle the ePrivacy Regulation.

Finland, Romania, Austria and Bulgaria were among the countries that could not figure out ePrivacy during their presidencies, and now it’s Croatia’s turn at the plate. While the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs pushed forward a version of ePrivacy back in October 2017, however, progress since that vote has essentially been nonexistent.

Full article: Croatian Presidency tempers expectations on ePrivacy progress

Lawmakers push bipartisan update to children’s online privacy law

House lawmakers are introducing a bipartisan bill Thursday to update a long-standing children’s online privacy law so that parents could force companies to delete personal information collected about their kids.

The changes include allowing parents to delete personal information collected online about their kids. The legislation would also require parental consent before companies can collect personal data like names, addresses and selfies from children under 16 years old.

Source: Reps. Walberg and Rush push bipartisan update to children’s online privacy law – Axios

State Legislatures Are Off to the Privacy Races

New Hampshire legislators introduced new data privacy legislation, New Hampshire House Bill 1680.

The legislation is similar to the California Consumer Privacy Act (which we’ve written extensively about before, including here and here ). It grants consumers access, portability, transparency, non-discrimination, deletion, and opt-out-of-sale rights (or opt-into-sale rights for minor consumers) with respect to their personal information.

New Hampshire’s is the first data privacy bill we have seen this season, but it’s worth noting that Virginia and Illinois have introduced their own bills. Additionally, several states, including Washington and New York, had proposed privacy bills in the 2019 legislative session.

Source: State Legislatures Are Off to the Privacy Races, With New Hampshire in the Lead

Ten Questions—And Answers—About the California Consumer Privacy Act

You may have heard from a lot of businesses telling you that they’ve updated their privacy policies because of a new law called the California Consumer Privacy Act. But what’s actually changed for you?

EFF has spent the past year defending this law in the California legislature, but we realize that not everyone has been following it as closely as we have.

Read full article: Ten Questions—And Answers—About the California Consumer Privacy Act

Avoid heavy AI regulation, White House tells EU

The US administration has urged European lawmakers to avoid heavy regulation frameworks in the future rollout of Artificial Intelligence technologies on the continent.

The call comes ahead of the European Commission’s planned presentation of its AI strategy, set to be announced early this year.

Source: Avoid heavy AI regulation, White House tells EU – EURACTIV.com

Most companies not yet compliant with CCPA

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) became effective on January 1, 2020, but according to major news sources most companies are not yet compliant or prepared for the impact CCPA will have.

The use of third-party data is threatened by the CCPA as it will greatly affect what data can be used for targeting purposes. This means first-party data still reigns supreme and for brands, managing customer relationships is more important now than ever before.

Source: #Privacy: Most companies not yet compliant with CCPA

California Will Be Key Battleground in Tech Privacy Fight in 2020

On Jan. 1, the law—the California Consumer Privacy Act—officially took effect. But that is hardly the end of it. The legislation could very well be back on the ballot in the state in 2020, an illustration of how little has been settled when it comes to rules about privacy, either in California or nationally.

Many privacy advocates remain skeptical of the prospects for a federal privacy law. With Congress stalled, other states may also press ahead with their own laws.

Full article: California Will Be Key Battleground in Tech Privacy Fight in 2020 – Bloomberg

Twitter and Microsoft show data privacy is moving from sticking point to selling point

A couple of tech heavyweights are making data privacy part of their branding, hoping to stay ahead of regulations.

Twitter thinks a strong position on data privacy could be advantageous. Distrust of social media platforms has never been so widespread, and in the current environment, it’s not crazy to decide that winning on trust can make a real long-term difference to user numbers and bottom line. Microsoft is another heavyweight positioning itself to benefit from a commitment to user data privacy.

Full article: Twitter and Microsoft show data privacy is moving from sticking point to selling point | VentureBeat

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