fbpx

Free tools and resources for Data Protection Officers!

Tag Archives for " location data "

International Privacy Experts Adopt Recommendations for AI, Location Tracking

The International Working Group on Data Protection has adopted new recommendations for artificial intelligence and location tracking.

The Berlin-based Working Group includes data protection authorities who assess emerging privacy challenges. The IWG report “Privacy and Artificial Intelligence” sets out fairness and respect for human rights, oversight, transparency and intelligibility as key elements of AI design and use.

Source: International Privacy Experts Adopt Recommendations for AI, Location Tracking

Hacker Finds He Can Remotely Kill Car Engines After Breaking Into GPS Tracking Apps

A hacker broke into thousands of accounts belonging to users of two GPS tracker apps, giving him the ability to monitor the locations of tens of thousands of vehicles and even turn off the engines for some of them while they were in motion.

The hacker hacked into more than 7,000 iTrack accounts and more than 20,000 ProTrack accounts, two apps that companies use to monitor and manage fleets of vehicles through GPS tracking devices. On some cars, the software has the capability of remotely turning off the engines of vehicles that are stopped or are traveling 12 miles per hour or slower, according to the manufacturer of certain GPS tracking devices.

Source: Hacker Finds He Can Remotely Kill Car Engines After Breaking Into GPS Tracking Apps – Motherboard

How to slow Google Sensorvault from tracking your location on iOS, Android

Not only is Google Maps tracking you, but a program called Google Sensorvault is potentially turning over your location data to law enforcement.

If you want to fully disable location tracking (which, keep in mind, will limit certain apps’ location-driven capabilities), you need to disable another setting called Web & App Activity.

Full article: How to slow Google Sensorvault from tracking your location on iOS, Android – CNET

83% of consumers now aware of marketers tracking their locations

The majority of people (63 percent) are now much more aware that marketers are using their personal data as compared with a year ago, likely due to stepped up reporting about various data breaches and scandals. Beyond this, 83 percent of survey respondents said that they were aware that companies “actively track their location data.”

Consumers have a layered or somewhat nuanced view of location tracking. The audience breaks into three groups: those who’ve disabled location tracking (33 percent), those who have permanently enabled it (29 percent) and those in the middle (38 percent) who will sometimes enable it when prompted.

Source: 83% of consumers now aware of marketers tracking their locations – study – MarTech Today

Data location vendor worked with GDPR regulator on data consent model, yielding 70% opt-in rates

Last August French privacy regulator CNIL cited two French location-intelligence companies (Fidzup and Teemo) as non-compliant with GDPR consent rules (as well as French privacy law).

Teemo then worked cooperatively with CNIL to develop specific consent language around third-party use of location data. Surprisingly, but the opt-in rates were 70%. Teemo says that transparency gives consumers a sense of control and they respond positively as a result.

Source: Data location vendor worked with GDPR regulator on data consent model, yielding 70% opt-in rates – MarTech Today

Digital IDs Are More Dangerous Than You Think

Governments seek to digitize their citizens in an effort to universalize government services, while the banking, travel, and insurance industries aim to create more seamless processes for their products and services. However, digital ID poses one of the gravest risks to human rights when combined with facial recognition technology, geo-location and other identifiers.

Source: Digital IDs Are More Dangerous Than You Think | WIRED

Google tracks your movements, like it or not

Google wants to know where you go so badly that it records your movements even when you explicitly tell it not to. An Associated Press investigation found that many Google services on Android devices and iPhones store your location data even if you’ve used a privacy setting that says it will prevent Google from doing so.

Source: AP Exclusive: Google tracks your movements, like it or not

How One Location-Based Data Firm Is Preparing for GDPR

Mobile location firms that collect latitude and longitude stats have been particularly scrutinized because the data is considered personal under GDPR, requiring that consumers consent to providing companies with their information—which could potentially creep consumers out if they know their location is being mined for advertising.

Los Angeles location firm Factual is aiming to mitigate GDPR’s risks by scraping all of its data collected on European citizens. It will then get to work rebuilding its database by asking for consumers’ “explicit consent.” The company’s contracts now also require that partners have obtained data explicitly.

Source: How One Location-Based Data Firm Is Preparing for GDPR – Adweek

Your Location Data Is Being Sold—Often Without Your Knowledge

As location-aware advertising goes mainstream—like that Jack in the Box ad that appears whenever you get near one, in whichever app you have open at the time—and as popular apps harvest your lucrative location data, the potential for leaking or exploiting this data has never been higher.

It’s true that your smartphone’s location-tracking capabilities can be helpful, whether it’s alerting you to traffic or inclement weather. But you are giving away more data about your location than you probably realize through smartphone apps—and that data is being sold, often without your knowledge.

Source: Your Location Data Is Being Sold—Often Without Your Knowledge – WSJ

What the GDPR will mean for companies tracking location

The tracking of people’s location is becoming an increasingly useful tool for many businesses, whether they want to use it to connect customers with their special offers, monitor footfall, or provide other location-based services.

However, a snag is coming in the shape of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, which introduces much tougher rules around the collection and use of personal data. And location data can most certainly qualify as personal data, anytime it relates to an identifiable individual.

Source: What the GDPR will mean for companies tracking location

>