fbpx

Download free GDPR compliance checklist!

Tag Archives for " marketing "

Facebook allows pseudo-science ads target cancer patients

Being targeted by those who traffic in false promises feels like a “slap in the face”.

Pseudoscience companies tap directly into their fears and isolation, offering a sense of control, while claiming their products can end our pain. They exploit emotions to offer phony alternatives.

Source: Opinion | I Have Cancer. Now My Facebook Feed Is Full of ‘Alternative Care’ Ads. – The New York Times

Apple declined to implement 16 Web APIs in Safari due to privacy concerns

Apple said this week that it declined to implement 16 new web technologies (Web APIs) in Safari because they posed a threat to user privacy by opening new avenues for user fingerprinting.

Apple claims that the 16 Web APIs above would allow online advertisers and data analytics firms to create scripts that fingerprint users and their devices.

Source: Apple declined to implement 16 Web APIs in Safari due to privacy concerns | ZDNet

European Parliament calls to ban micro-targeted ads

European Parliament recently called on a ban on micro-targeted ads. Such a decision made by a democratically elected body is somewhat unprecedented.

Micro-targeting allows advertisers to use platform profiling to reach the “right” audience. For example targeting content based on traits such as: Male/Female, age, the location (i.e. based in Brussels), or preferences (i.e.  “likes yoghurt”), so on so on.

Source: European Parliament calls to ban micro-targeted ads. Now what?

UK launches new fake ad alert system to target online fraud

Fraudulent online advertising is being targeted via a new reporting system created by UK authorities.

The UK Scam Ad Alert, launched by The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) and the Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB) allows people to report scam ads appearing in paid-for-spaces online to the ASA, who will then circulate details of the ads, remove them and suspend the advertiser’s account where possible.

Source: #Privacy: UK launches new fake ad alert system to target online fraud – PrivSec Report

Belgian Data Protection Authority Imposes Fine on Non-Profit Organization for Unlawful Direct Marketing Practices

On May 29, 2020, the Litigation Chamber of the Belgian Data Protection Authority  imposed a fine of €1,000 on a non-profit organization.

The decision followed a complaint filed by an individual who continued to receive promotional materials from the organization after he had objected to the processing of his contact details for direct marketing purposes and had requested that the organization erase his data from its database.

Source: Belgian Data Protection Authority Imposes Fine on Non-Profit Organization for Unlawful Direct Marketing Practices

Report Reveals Consumers Want Contextually Relevant Ads, Yet Remain Cautious About Privacy

Two years since the enactment of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), data privacy remains a key concern for a significant 94% of consumers. Alongside this, whilst 33% of consumers remain unaware of data privacy regulations, such as the GDPR, nearly nine in ten (87%) of consumers now understand their browsing data will be used for advertising purposes.

The type of targeted advertising consumers are most receptive to was found to be behavioural and contextual. Consumer’s top preference for targeted ads includes targeting based on purchase history (35%) or browsing history (34%). A close second is targeted ads that are contextually relevant to the site a consumer is browsing, stated by a third (33%) of consumers to be their preferred means of targeting. Targeting based on demographic data, such as life stage (19%) or job (15%), was the least preferred method of targeted advertising.

Source: Report Reveals Consumers Want Contextually Relevant Ads, Yet Remain Cautious About Privacy | ExchangeWire.com

Google is auditioning candidates to succeed the third-party cookie

Google wants other ad exchanges and demand-side platforms to run tests to see whether its proposals to replace third-party cookies will work in actual ad auctions.

Google is ready to test some of its recently announced “Privacy Sandbox” proposals with other exchanges and demand-side platforms to see how its plans to replace third-party cookies with less data-invasive solutions will actually work within advertising auctions. The move marks yet another step in Google’s two-year countdown towards its intention to end support for third-party cookies in Chrome.

Source: Google is auditioning candidates to succeed the third-party cookie – Digiday

No need to mourn the death of the third-party cookie

Amid the whirlwinds of the industry’s response, it’s become abundantly clear that the demise of the cookie is probably a good thing for everyone involved – audience members, publishers and even marketers.

The cookie’s demise has been written on the wall for some time. Many trends have been gradually diminishing the efficacy of the cookie. And, people generally dislike the feeling of someone tracking their every online move. Why not replace that tension with a better model? It’s time to turn to newer, better tools.

Full article: No need to mourn the death of the third-party cookie

Adtech giant Criteo is being investigated by France’s data watchdog

Adtech giant Criteo is under investigation by the French data protection watchdog, the CNIL, following a complaint filed by privacy rights campaign group Privacy International.

Privacy International has been campaigning for more than a year for European data protection agencies to investigate several adtech players and data brokers involved in programmatic advertising.

Source: Adtech giant Criteo is being investigated by France’s data watchdog | TechCrunch

Publishers Are Wary Of New Tech That Wants To Use Their First-Party Cookies

With the clock ticking on third-party cookies, publishers will soon be the only part of the ad ecosystem with direct relationships with their readers.

The identity-preserving workarounds pitched by agencies and buy-side ad tech often involve using a publisher’s first-party cookie to store information, and allowing outside partners to call up these first-party cookie records (often via API) and stitch them together to understand identity.

Other solutions use local storage or have a publisher create a new subdomain (a CNAME record) for the ad tech company that allows them to set first-party cookies. Then, buyers can essentially recreate the identity that powers the open web.

Unfortunately, most – though not all – of these solutions fail to meet publishers’ privacy compliance criteria, and many feel these are temporary workarounds vs. true innovations.

Full article: Publishers Are Wary Of New Tech That Wants To Use Their First-Party Cookies | AdExchanger

1 2 3 24
>