Tag Archives for " marketing "

How PrivacyChain could solve one of consent management’s biggest problems

The new privacy blockchain proposal — announced last week by the Interactive Advertising Bureau’s Tech Lab in conjunction with identity resolution provider LiveRamp — could solve one of the biggest problems of consent management.

When a user allows a publisher to use her info for marketing or ads, the consent info is passed via a TCF-suitable consent management platform to vendors who have been approved by the publisher, such as ad exchanges, data management platforms, tag management platforms and so on. But those vendors could share the info with other vendors, or there might be vendors on the web site who got hold of the info without the publisher’s knowledge.

Full article: How the IAB Tech Lab’s new PrivacyChain could solve one of consent management’s biggest problems – MarTech Today

Facebook Is Giving Advertisers Access to Your Shadow Contact Information

Facebook is not content to use the contact information you willingly put into your Facebook profile for advertising. It is also using contact information you handed over for security purposes and contact information you didn’t hand over at all, but that was collected from other people’s contact books, a hidden layer of details Facebook has about you. The junk email address that you hand over for discounts or for shady online shopping is likely associated with your account and being used to target you with ads. And users who want their accounts to be more secure are forced to make a privacy trade-off and allow advertisers to more easily find them on the social network.

Source: Facebook Is Giving Advertisers Access to Your Shadow Contact Information

Building consumer trust and overcoming privacy barriers with on-device AI

New data and privacy legislation is helping to protect and give consumers what they want: less irrelevant marketing junk. However, with less access to online behaviours and little understanding of offline personas, it is becoming more difficult for brands to understand their consumer needs.  In order for brands to be able to communicate relevant and personalised content, a middle ground needs to be met.

Full article: Building consumer trust and overcoming privacy barriers with on-device AI

Here’s how GDPR is already changing web design

When Europe’s sweeping privacy regulations (called GDPR) took effect in May, it was unclear just how much the new rules would affect this completely ubiquitous fact of life on the internet, but a report from the Reuters Institute gives us an early look: Among news sites–which tend to use the most cookies, since they’re dependent on ad dollars–cookies are down by 22%.

Source: Third-party cookies have dropped by 22% since GDPR took effect

The growing role of second party data in marketing

May we see second party data have a growing role in marketing today if secure platforms are to enable such marketplaces to emerge? In an age where data is THE hot commodity, the trading of first party data between publishers, brands and like-minded organisations is a welcome and natural opportunity.

Read article: The growing role of second party data in marketing

Google and Mastercard Cut a Secret Ad Deal to Track Retail Sales

Google and Mastercard brokered a business partnership that gave Google an unprecedented asset for measuring retail spending, part of the search giant’s strategy to fortify its primary business against onslaughts from Amazon.com and others.

But the deal, which has not been previously reported, could raise broader privacy concerns about how much consumer data technology companies like Google quietly absorb. People don’t expect what they buy physically in a store to be linked to what they are buying online.

Source: Google and Mastercard Cut a Secret Ad Deal to Track Retail Sales – Bloomberg

GDPR: what does it mean for direct mail?

The dust is beginning to settle and we are slowly exiting the grey GDPR cloud. Of course, the legislation is far from out of the news, and many are still unsure what it means for the future of marketing. Direct mail is one such medium that hasn’t suffered the same effects as online advertising, with the GDPR proving a potential boon for the channel.

Read full article: GDPR: what does it mean for direct mail?

California Privacy Protection Act will impact Ad Tech

On June 28, the California Legislature hastily passed the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA). The law, which takes effect in less than 1 ½ years, Jan. 1, 2020, ushers in a GDPR-light approach here in the United States. No more buffer. No more distant regulators unable or unwilling to reach US companies on their home turf. If they haven’t already done so, the time for ad tech companies to change the way they store and process data is fast approaching.

Read article: Should Ad Tech Panic Over The California Privacy Protection Act Now Or Later? | AdExchanger

Under GDPR, publishers are adopting consent management platforms

More publishers are feeling under pressure to adopt a consent-management platform to be compliant with the General Data Protection Regulation. In the U.K., 31 percent of publishers had a CMP, an increase of 12 percent from July to August. Among U.S. publishers, 27 percent had a CMP in August, up 13 percent from the month before.

Source: Under GDPR, publishers are adopting CMPs for fear of losing out on ad revenue – Digiday

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