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Tag Archives for " marketing "

Unsolicited marketing: the right approach for e-billing in light of GDPR

In a recent study by consumer body Which?, several major retailers were potentially at risk for violations of data protection regulations by sending marketing content to customers via e-receipts – the same customers who specifically requested not to be contacted for promotional offerings.

It comes as no surprise that retailers are determined to deploy such a high engagement tactic, but it does not take a GDPR expert to work out that turning transactional communications into a marketing opportunity requires thorough understanding of the rules about what can and cannot be done.

Full article: Unsolicited marketing: the right approach for e-billing in light of GDPR – GDPR.Report

Geofencing rises privacy concerns

Geofencing is becoming increasingly popular as a means by which to deliver hypertargeted advertising content.

At the same time, today’s data privacy regulatory environment is increasingly aggressive and gaining international momentum. Geofencing raises a number of legal concerns that digital marketers must consider to avoid being caught in regulatory crosshairs.

Full article: Geofencing Could Become A Magnet For Regulatory Scrutiny | AdExchanger

Company closure and 4-year ban for director after marketing regulation breach

A director of a lead generating service has been banned for four years after failing to ensure his company complied with text message regulations.

Lad Media Limited sent over 393,000 SMS messages were sent to members of the public, including to individuals whom had withdrawn their consent regarding the receipt of marketing texts or calls.

Irrespective of Lad Media’s claim that the illegal marketing had not been their fault, but was instead due to the actions of third parties, the ICO imposed a fine of £20,000.

Source: Company closure and 4-year ban for director after marketing regulation breach

Data location vendor worked with GDPR regulator on data consent model, yielding 70% opt-in rates

Last August French privacy regulator CNIL cited two French location-intelligence companies (Fidzup and Teemo) as non-compliant with GDPR consent rules (as well as French privacy law).

Teemo then worked cooperatively with CNIL to develop specific consent language around third-party use of location data. Surprisingly, but the opt-in rates were 70%. Teemo says that transparency gives consumers a sense of control and they respond positively as a result.

Source: Data location vendor worked with GDPR regulator on data consent model, yielding 70% opt-in rates – MarTech Today

EU DPAs urged to act against online ad auctions

Panoptykon Foundation, the Warsaw based digital rights organization, has joined in the complaints filed in the UK and Ireland in September by Jim Killock of the Open Rights Group, Michael Veale of University College London, and Dr Johnny Ryan of Brave.

Together, the complainants in Ireland, Poland, and the UK, have also filed new evidence today with the national data protection authorities of Ireland, Poland, and the United Kingdom, that reveals how ad auction companies, including Google, unlawfully profile Internet users’ religious beliefs, ethnicities, diseases, disabilities, and sexual orientation.

Full article: Update on GDPR complaint (RTB ad auctions)

Privacy Groups Claim Online Ads Can Target Abuse Victims

Complaints filed in Europe claim internet companies categorize users based on potentially sensitive browsing habits, and then use those labels to target ads.

For instance, the list of labels agreed upon by the Interactive Advertising Bureau, a trade group that establishes industry norms, includes categories like incest/abuse support, gay life, hate content, substance abuse, and AIDS/HIV.

Source: Privacy Groups Claim Online Ads Can Target Abuse Victims | WIRED

Facebook restricts campaigners’ ability to check ads for political transparency

Facebook has restricted the ability of external political transparency campaigners to monitor adverts placed on the social network, in a move described as an “appalling look” by one of the organisations affected.

The monitoring tools, which involve asking users to install a browser plug-in and collecting data on the adverts they see, has helped expose many of the advertising tactics used by politicians, making it harder for those who pay for negative adverts to escape scrutiny.

Source: Facebook restricts campaigners’ ability to check ads for political transparency

Google to block ad-blockers in Chrome

The drafted changes will limit the capabilities available to extension developers, ostensibly for the sake of speed and safety. Chromium forms the central core of Google Chrome, and, soon, Microsoft Edge.

Source: Wow, fancy that. Web ad giant Google to block ad-blockers in Chrome. For safety, apparently • The Register

The case against behavioral advertising is stacking up

The NYT’s experience puts fresh taint on long-running efforts by tech giants like Facebook to press publishers to give up more control and ownership of their audiences by serving and even producing content directly for the third party platforms.

Full article: The case against behavioral advertising is stacking up | TechCrunch

What is identity resolution?

Identity resolution tools take simple analytics a step further by tying online behavior to a consumer’s unique identity, giving marketers the information they need to zero in on their target consumers with highly personalized, tailored offers that, in turn, lead to higher ROI.

It works by reconciling all available data points, which include those collected by first-, second- and/or third-parties. A composite is built that provides marketers with a cherished 360-degree view of a customer’s identity and user journey, and enables an insight-informed, data-driven “single-customer view” — also known as people-based, or user-level, marketing.

Full article: What is identity resolution? – MarTech Today

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