Tag Archives for " monitoring "

New Zealand police eyeing up newer, smarter CCTV facial recognition technology

Cops look to upgrade their CCTV surveillance technology, sparking calls for a privacy debate.

With a network of CCTV cameras across the country, it would give criminals fewer places to hide. Also in the high-tech system would be suspects, prisoners, firearms licence details, missing people and those on the child sex offender register.

Source: Police eyeing up newer, smarter CCTV facial recognition technology | Stuff.co.nz

Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent Crime

Citizens may object to their social media mining by law enforcement, but the practice can keep the public safe.

Police departments should continue to monitor social media to inform law enforcement. After all, social media sites are full of data that can make police interventions more effective, from posts about crimes in progress to damning evidence offered freely by criminals and even live videos of crimes. However, in designing these initiatives, police departments need to pay closer attention to the Constitution as well as the needs of citizens.

Source: Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent Crime | WIRED

How to Delete Your Google Search History in a Few Easy Steps

Deleting your Google web browser history and Google Google search history is one way to limit how much data you allow to be collected about you on the internet. Even if you’re someone who already uses Google’s incognito web browser, you’re still not being kept completely anonymous online.

Believe it or not, there are other web browsers out there besides Google, they are just much less well-known. One example of a search engine that prioritizes user privacy is DuckDuckGo, which is essentially a Google that doesn’t track you online.

Source: How to Delete Your Google Search History in a Few Easy Steps | Money

Are your phone camera and microphone spying on you?

Here is what the former FBI director James Comey said when he was asked back in September 2016 if he covered his laptop’s webcam with tape.

“Heck yeah, heck yeah. Also, I get mocked for a lot of things, and I am much mocked for that, but I hope people lock their cars … lock your doors at night. I have an alarm system, if you have an alarm system you should use it, I use mine.”

Source: Are your phone camera and microphone spying on you? | Dylan Curran | Opinion | The Guardian

US suspects cellphone spying devices in DC

For the first time, the U.S. government has publicly acknowledged the existence in Washington of what appear to be rogue devices that foreign spies and criminals could be using to track individual cellphones and intercept calls and messages.

The use of what are known as cellphone-site simulators by foreign powers has long been a concern, but American intelligence and law enforcement agencies — which use such eavesdropping equipment themselves — have been silent on the issue until now.

Source: APNewsBreak: US suspects cellphone spying devices in DC

How to Turn Off Location Services on Your Smartphone

It’s no secret that marketers and others are using smartphone location tracking to monitor your travels. So what can you do about it? Consumer Reports explains how to limit access to that data through your phone’s settings.

Source: How to Turn Off Location Services on Your Smartphone – Consumer Reports

Dutch say ‘no’ in referendum on spy agency tapping powers

Dutch voters have narrowly rejected a law that would give spy agencies the power to carry out mass tapping of Internet traffic delivering a setback to Prime Minister Mark Rutte’s government.

Dubbed the “trawling law” by opponents, the legislation would allow spy agencies to install wire taps targeting an entire geographic region or avenue of communication, store information for up to three years, and share it with allied spy agencies.

Source: Dutch say ‘no’ in referendum on spy agency tapping powers

China to bar people with bad ‘social credit’ from planes, trains

China said it will begin applying its so-called social credit system to flights and trains and stop people who have committed misdeeds from taking such transport for up to a year.

People who would be put on the restricted lists included those found to have committed acts like spreading false information about terrorism and causing trouble on flights, as well as those who used expired tickets or smoked on trains, according to two statements issued on the National Development and Reform Commission’s website on Friday.

Source: China to bar people with bad ‘social credit’ from planes, trains

Uber to share its London data in latest charm offensive

Uber is fighting to keep its 40,000 drivers operating on the roads of Britain’s capital city, its most important European market, after Transport for London (TfL) deemed it not “fit and proper” to run a taxi service, in a move which it is appealing.

The Silicon Valley firm has announced a number of changes to its business model in recent months including the introduction of 24/7 telephone support and the proactive reporting of serious incidents to London’s police.

Source: Uber to share its London data in latest charm offensive

Madison Square Garden Has Used Face-Scanning Technology on Customers

Madison Square Garden has quietly used facial-recognition technology to bolster security and identify those entering the building, according to multiple people familiar with the arena’s security procedures.

The technology uses cameras to capture images of people, and then an algorithm compares the images to a database of photographs to help identify the person and, when used for security purposes, to determine if the person is considered a problem. The technology, which is sometimes used for marketing and promotions, has raised concerns over personal privacy and the security of any data that is stored by the system.

Source: Madison Square Garden Has Used Face-Scanning Technology on Customers – The New York Times

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