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Tag Archives for " monitoring "

San Francisco Police Accessed Business District Camera Network to Spy on Protestors

The San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) conducted mass surveillance of protesters at the end of May and in early June using a downtown business district’s camera network, according to new records obtained by EFF.

The records show that SFPD received real-time live access to hundreds of cameras as well as a “data dump” of camera footage amid the ongoing demonstrations against police violence.

Source: San Francisco Police Accessed Business District Camera Network to Spy on Protestors

The FBI Is Secretly Using A $2 Billion Travel Company As A Global Surveillance Tool

An unprecedented order on a huge travel company reveals how the FBI tracks suspects around the world.

As the biggest of three companies that store the vast majority of the world’s travel information—from airline seats to hotel bookings — Sabre has been called on to hand over that travellers’ data and, on at least one occasion, do “real-time” tracking of a suspect. And, say former employees, the same powerful trove of information could be used to help monitor the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Source: The FBI Is Secretly Using A $2 Billion Travel Company As A Global Surveillance Tool

Coronavirus opens door to company surveillance of workers

Privacy advocates warn of a slippery slope toward “normalizing” new levels of employer surveillance.

Employers are rushing to use digital tracking technology to reduce virus transmission in the workplace. But privacy experts worry that businesses will start using their newfound surveillance capabilities for purposes far beyond public health. The data could be used to evaluate workers’ productivity, see which colleagues are holding meetings or even flag an employee who unexpectedly ducks out of the office during work hours.

Full article: Coronavirus opens door to company surveillance of workers – POLITICO

PwC facial recognition tool criticised for home working privacy invasion

Accounting giant PwC has come under fire for the development of a facial recognition tool that logs when employees are absent from their computer screens while they work from home.

The technology, which is being developed specifically for financial institutions, recognises the faces of workers via their computer’s webcam and requires them to provide a written reason for any absences, including toilet breaks.

Source: PwC facial recognition tool criticised for home working privacy invasion – Personnel Today

Long before the Coronavirus emergency law, Netherlands Central Bureau of Statistics had been tracking civilian mobile phones

An emergency law of the cabinet must regulate that the government can monitor the mobile phones of citizens in the Netherlands for the fight against COVID-19, but it now appears that the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) previously did this on a large scale.

Together with Vodafone, Statistics Netherlands recorded how many people visited King’s Day 2018 in Amsterdam and where they came from. The Dutch Data Protection Authority (AP) is therefore examining whether the statistical office has thereby violated the law.

Source: Lang voor de coronaspoedwet volgde het CBS al telefoons van burgers – NRC

Police body cameras at protests raise privacy concerns

They were supposed to add accountability to the police. But critics say they’re backfiring and could cause a chilling effect on free speech at protests.

Protesters have long been worried about surveillance at demonstrations, the latest twist being police use of technology like facial recognition and social media monitoring to identify people in crowds. Using body cameras as surveillance tools at protests threaten people’s privacy and could have a chilling effect on free speech.

Full article: Police body cameras at protests raise privacy concerns – CNET

Glasses Equipped With Facial Recognition Are Coming

New York-based Vuzix is selling augmented reality headsets to identify suspects.

In February, Gizmodo reported that Vuzix was working with Clearview AI to bring its billion-person facial recognition to Vuzix’s AR glasses. (Clearview said at the time that the app was just a prototype.)

Vuzix also recently announced that it was working with a company called TensorMark to bring facial recognition to the company’s headsets. Vuzix is pitching its product as a solution not just for security, but also border patrol, first responders, retail, hospitality, and banking.

Facial recognition in an AR headset raises all the same issues as the technology when deployed in CCTV cameras, including privacy and accuracy. But the small form factor also begs new questions, like what shortcuts might have been taken to run facial recognition algorithms on smaller, weaker computing chips? Do matches get double-checked by anyone?

Source: Glasses Equipped With Facial Recognition Are Coming

A key part of surveillance reform is now in jeopardy.

Seven years after the Snowden revelations, there’s a real chance for changes that will bolster oversight and provide some much-needed accountability.

The Senate version of the USA FREEDOM Reauthorization Act expands the role of amici curiae who can help protect the rights of those under surveillance.

Source: A key part of surveillance reform is now in jeopardy.

French Court Bans the Use of Drone Surveillance to Enforce Covid-19 Lockdown

The Conseil d’État, France’s highest administrative court, issued a decision banning French authorities from using drone surveillance to track individuals violating social distancing rules.

The Court cited privacy issues with drone surveillance and stated that drone surveillance by police would be banned until technology is added to prevent the filming and identification of individuals or approval was given by France’s privacy regulator, the Commission nationale de l’informatique et des libertés (CNIL).

Source: French Court Bans the Use of Drone Surveillance to Enforce Covid-19 Lockdown

German Mass Surveillance Abroad is Ruled Unconstitutional

In a landmark decision, the German Constitutional Court has ruled that mass surveillance of telecommunications outside of Germany conducted on foreign nationals is unconstitutional.

In its press release about the decision, the court found that the privacy rights of the German constitution also protects foreigners in other countries and that the German intelligence agency, Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND), had no authority to conduct telecommunications surveillance on them.

The court also decided that as currently structured, there was no way for the BND to restrict the type of data collected and who it was being collected from. Unrestricted mass surveillance posed a particular threat to the rights and safety of lawyers, journalists and their sources and clients.

Source: Victory! German Mass Surveillance Abroad is Ruled Unconstitutional

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