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Tag Archives for " monitoring "

Apple delays new anti-tracking privacy feature for phones and tablets

Apple has delayed the introduction of a stricter privacy feature designed to stop apps and websites tracking people online without their consent. The company had previously announced a change that would mean app developers have to ask users for permission to track them for advertising purposes.

The company had previously announced a change that would mean app developers have to ask users for permission to track them for advertising purposes. The measures were due to be implemented in the iOS 14 update to its operating system in the autumn.

Source: Apple delays new anti-tracking privacy feature for phones and tablets

Doorbell Cameras Help to Spy on Police

Two leaked documents show how a monitoring tool used by police has been turned against them.

The rise of the internet-connected home security camera has generally been a boon to police, as owners of these devices can (and frequently do) share footage with cops at the touch of a button. But according to a leaked FBI bulletin, law enforcement has discovered an ironic downside to ubiquitous privatized surveillance: The cameras are alerting residents when police show up to conduct searches.

Source: Doorbell Cameras Like Ring Give Early Warning of Police Searches, FBI Warned

Surveillance Scandal Involving U.S. Intelligence Hits Denmark

Denmark has been rocked by a surveillance scandal in which private citizens’ data was allegedly collected by military intelligence and then shared with foreign powers.

The revelations, brought forward by a whistle-blower, have already resulted in several high-level dismissals at the agency.

Source: Surveillance Scandal Involving U.S. Intelligence Hits Denmark

Barclays faces ICO probe for ‘spying on staff’

The watchdog is investigating allegations the firm used computer monitoring software to track employees.

The British bank has been known in the past to use employee-tracking software such as Sapience and OccupEye. Sapience is used for tracking employees’ productivity by monitoring their computer usage, while OccupEye tracks the time that is spent by employees at their desks.

Source: Barclays faces ICO probe for ‘spying on staff’ | IT PRO

San Francisco Police Accessed Business District Camera Network to Spy on Protestors

The San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) conducted mass surveillance of protesters at the end of May and in early June using a downtown business district’s camera network, according to new records obtained by EFF.

The records show that SFPD received real-time live access to hundreds of cameras as well as a “data dump” of camera footage amid the ongoing demonstrations against police violence.

Source: San Francisco Police Accessed Business District Camera Network to Spy on Protestors

The FBI Is Secretly Using A $2 Billion Travel Company As A Global Surveillance Tool

An unprecedented order on a huge travel company reveals how the FBI tracks suspects around the world.

As the biggest of three companies that store the vast majority of the world’s travel information—from airline seats to hotel bookings — Sabre has been called on to hand over that travellers’ data and, on at least one occasion, do “real-time” tracking of a suspect. And, say former employees, the same powerful trove of information could be used to help monitor the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Source: The FBI Is Secretly Using A $2 Billion Travel Company As A Global Surveillance Tool

Coronavirus opens door to company surveillance of workers

Privacy advocates warn of a slippery slope toward “normalizing” new levels of employer surveillance.

Employers are rushing to use digital tracking technology to reduce virus transmission in the workplace. But privacy experts worry that businesses will start using their newfound surveillance capabilities for purposes far beyond public health. The data could be used to evaluate workers’ productivity, see which colleagues are holding meetings or even flag an employee who unexpectedly ducks out of the office during work hours.

Full article: Coronavirus opens door to company surveillance of workers – POLITICO

PwC facial recognition tool criticised for home working privacy invasion

Accounting giant PwC has come under fire for the development of a facial recognition tool that logs when employees are absent from their computer screens while they work from home.

The technology, which is being developed specifically for financial institutions, recognises the faces of workers via their computer’s webcam and requires them to provide a written reason for any absences, including toilet breaks.

Source: PwC facial recognition tool criticised for home working privacy invasion – Personnel Today

Long before the Coronavirus emergency law, Netherlands Central Bureau of Statistics had been tracking civilian mobile phones

An emergency law of the cabinet must regulate that the government can monitor the mobile phones of citizens in the Netherlands for the fight against COVID-19, but it now appears that the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) previously did this on a large scale.

Together with Vodafone, Statistics Netherlands recorded how many people visited King’s Day 2018 in Amsterdam and where they came from. The Dutch Data Protection Authority (AP) is therefore examining whether the statistical office has thereby violated the law.

Source: Lang voor de coronaspoedwet volgde het CBS al telefoons van burgers – NRC

Police body cameras at protests raise privacy concerns

They were supposed to add accountability to the police. But critics say they’re backfiring and could cause a chilling effect on free speech at protests.

Protesters have long been worried about surveillance at demonstrations, the latest twist being police use of technology like facial recognition and social media monitoring to identify people in crowds. Using body cameras as surveillance tools at protests threaten people’s privacy and could have a chilling effect on free speech.

Full article: Police body cameras at protests raise privacy concerns – CNET

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