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Facebook monitors and tracks the locations of users it deems a threat

Facebook monitors and tracks the locations of its users when the company’s security team finds that they are making credible threats on its social network.

The company actively monitors its platform for threatening comments. Once Facebook determines that a threat from a user is credible, the company uses data from its products to track that person’s location. However, it’s unclear what a ‘credible’ threat actually looks like.

Source: Facebook monitors and tracks the locations of users it deems a threat – The Verge

Google has quietly dropped ban on personally identifiable web tracking

When Google bought the advertising network DoubleClick in 2007, Google founder Sergey Brin said that privacy would be the company’s “number one priority when we contemplate new kinds of advertising products.”

But this summer, Google quietly erased that last privacy line in the sand – literally crossing out the lines in its privacy policy that promised to keep the two pots of data separate by default. In its place, Google substituted new language that says browsing habits “may be” combined with what the company learns from the use Gmail and other tools.

Source: Google has quietly dropped ban on personally identifiable web tracking

Many popular iPhone apps secretly record your screen without asking

Many major companies, like Air Canada, Hollister and Expedia, are recording every tap and swipe you make on their iPhone apps.

In most cases you won’t even realize it. And they don’t need to ask for permission. You can assume that most apps are collecting data on you. Some even monetize your data without your knowledge.

Source: Many popular iPhone apps secretly record your screen without asking | TechCrunch

Your VPN could be a privacy trap

When people turn to a VPN service, they expect full-on anonymity. Particularly when the VPN service says, “we do NOT keep any logs that can identify … a user” or “we have a strict zero-logs policy.”

These days, it seems that when it comes to claims about VPN logging policy, it is mostly just marketing speak. Many VPN services actually keep logs of user activity despite making claims to the contrary — in other words, they are disguised privacy traps waiting to be triggered.

Source: Your VPN could be a privacy trap

Google Screenwise: An Unwise Trade of All Your Privacy for Cash

Imagine this: an enormous tech company is tracking what you do on your phone, even when you’re not using any of its services, down to the specific images that you see. It’s also tracking all of your network traffic, because you’re installing one of its specially-designed routers.

Full article: Google Screenwise: An Unwise Trade of All Your Privacy for Cash

Apple cracks down on Facebook after it paid teens for access to their data

Facebook paid users as young as 13 to install an app that gave the company access to everything their phone sent or received over the internet. In response, Apple has revoked Facebook’s ability to publish certain apps, in a move that could have far-reaching implications for both companies.

Facebook has been accused of exploiting a loophole in Apple’s privacy regulations to publish the iPhone app, which provided it with data it used to keep ahead of youth trends.

Source: Apple cracks down on Facebook after it paid teens for access to their data

Why Facebook’s ’10-Year Challenge’ Is A Disaster For Big Data Surveillance

Whether the response to this latest viral meme is a change of direction or a bump in the road, it’s too early to tell. But it’s definitely an awakening of sorts. For the first time, Big Tech might not have its hands so firmly on the steering wheel. The thing is, though, no-one else does either.

Full article: Why Facebook’s ’10-Year Challenge’ Is A Disaster For Big Data Surveillance

Bulk surveillance is always bad, say human rights groups

A band of human rights organisations have appealed against a top European court’s ruling on bulk surveillance, arguing that any form of mass spying breaches rights to privacy and free expression.

The group, which includes Liberty, Privacy International and the American Civil Liberties Union, has taken issue with parts of a September judgment from the European Court of Human Rights.

Full article: Bulk surveillance is always bad, say human rights orgs appealing against top Euro court • The Register

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