Tag Archives for " monitoring "

10 ways China watches its citizens

From tracking the activity of mobile app users to setting up a social credit scorecard, the world’s most populated country is taking surveillance technology to new heights. With a population of 1.3 billion, China’s plan to create a facial recognition system that can identify people within three seconds – with a 90 per cent accuracy rate – may seem ambitious, but that does not stop it from trying.

Read full article: Drones, facial recognition and a social credit system: 10 ways China watches its citizens | South China Morning Post

Facial recognition system to be used in 2020 Tokyo Olympics

A facial recognition system will be used across an Olympics for the first time as Tokyo organizers work to keep security tight and efficient at dozens of venues during the 2020 Games. The NeoFace technology developed by NEC Corp. will be customized to monitor every accredited person – including athletes, officials, staff and media – at more than 40 venues, games villages and media centres.

Source: Facial recognition system set to be used in Olympic security | CTV News

Nice is building “safe city”, rising privacy concerns

After terrorist attack of July 14, 2016, French city of Nice has turned itself into a testing ground for surveillance technology. Growing opposition to cutting-edge security highlights how the use of systems like facial recognition and artificial intelligence to fight crime is on a collision course with advocates of data privacy.

Read full article: Two Years Ago Terror Struck. Now They’re Unsure of the Response – Bloomberg

Walmart’s Newly Patented Technology For Eavesdropping On Workers Presents Privacy Concerns

Walmart just won a patent for audio surveillance technology that measures workers’ performance, and could even listen to their conversations with customers at checkout. While there’s no guarantee that Walmart will ever build this technology, the patent shows the company is thinking about using tech not just to facilitate deliveries or make its warehouses more efficient, but also to manage its workforce, which is the largest in the United States.

Source: Walmart’s Newly Patented Technology For Eavesdropping On Workers Presents Privacy Concerns

How Fracking Companies Use Facebook Surveillance to Ban Protest

Oil and gas companies are discrediting activists using social media to justify banning their protests. Three companies are currently seeking injunctions against protesters: British chemical giant INEOS, which has the largest number of shale gas drilling licenses in the UK; and small UK outfits UK Oil and Gas (UKOG), and Europa Oil and Gas. Among the thousands of pages of documents submitted to British courts by these companies are hundreds of Facebook and Twitter posts from anti-fracking protesters and campaign groups.

Source: How Fracking Companies Use Facebook Surveillance to Ban Protest – Motherboard

China’s Dystopian Dreams: A.I., Shame and Lots of Cameras

With millions of cameras and billions of lines of code, China is building a high-tech authoritarian future. Beijing is embracing technologies like facial recognition and artificial intelligence to identify and track 1.4 billion people. It wants to assemble a vast and unprecedented national surveillance system, with crucial help from its thriving technology industry.

China is reversing the commonly held vision of technology as a great democratizer, bringing people more freedom and connecting them to the world. In China, it has brought control.

Source: Inside China’s Dystopian Dreams: A.I., Shame and Lots of Cameras – The New York Times

Smart technology sees through walls to track and identify people

A group of researchers and students at MIT have developed an intelligent radar-like technology that makes it possible to see through walls to track people as they move around. This technology, known as RF-Pose, can reveal whether someone is walking, sitting, standing or even waving — and can identify individuals from a known group with a success rate of 83 percent. RF-Pose can be useful for monitoring the elderly or sick as well as for other applications — but that also raises privacy concerns.

Source: Smart technology sees through walls to track and identify people

DNA Tests on Separated Migrant Children Raise Privacy Issues

The Trump administration’s decision to use DNA testing to help reunite children separated from their parents at the Mexican border is sparking concerns among privacy advocates about how data will be used. Potential concerns include government surveillance of migrant families, or using the health information gleaned from DNA tests to deny access to services in the future. There are also concerns that DNA samples from children won’t be obtained with proper consent.

Source: DNA Tests on Separated Migrant Children Raise Privacy Issues – Bloomberg

EU Nations ‘Still Breaking The Law On Mass Surveillance’

Campaign groups, NGOs and academics have teamed up to file a series of complaints with the EU over bulk surveillance in several countries. They are calling for EU governments to stop requiring companies to store all communications data – a practice that’s been ruled unlawful by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) not just once but twice.

Blanket data retention requires phone and internet providers to retain the traffic data – numbers called, IP addresses, location data and identity – of all of their users for several months or years, depending on local national law. And despite rulings in 2014 and 2016 that this contravened European law, the practice still continues in more than a dozen EU countries.

Source: EU Nations ‘Still Breaking The Law On Mass Surveillance’

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