Tag Archives for " monitoring "

UN Privacy Rapporteur releases Draft Legal Instrument on Government-led Surveillance and Privacy

On 10 January 2018 the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy, Joseph Cannataci, released the Draft Legal Instrument on Government-led Surveillance and Privacy. It aims at giving clear and detailed guidance for the area of government-led or organized surveillance using electronic means.

Read the Draft Legal Instrument here.

EU Law Analysis: Data Retention is still here to stay, for now…

This post critically analyses the Court of Appeal’s judgment in Tom Watson and Others v Secretary of State for the Home Department with regards to general data retention, access to communications data on the basis of prior review by a court or an independent administrative body and notifications.

Source: EU Law Analysis: Data Retention is still here to stay, for now…

(Mis)conceptions About the Impact of Surveillance

Does surveillance impact behavior? Many remain skeptical while others believe any effects, if they are real, are only temporary or trivial. Government surveillance is back in the news thanks to the so-called “Nunes memo”, making this is a perfect time to examine new research on the impact of surveillance.

Source: (Mis)conceptions About the Impact of Surveillance

Chinese police are using facial recognition sunglasses to track citizens

China’s police have a new weapon in their surveillance arsenal: sunglasses with built-in facial recognition. According to reports from local media, the glasses are being tested at train stations in the “emerging megacity” of Zhengzhou, where they’ll be used to scan travelers during the upcoming Lunar New Year migration. This is a period of extremely busy holiday travel, often described as the largest human migration event on Earth, and police say the sunglasses have already been used to capture seven suspects wanted in major cases, as well as 26 individuals traveling under false identities.

Source: Chinese police are using facial recognition sunglasses to track citizens – The Verge

Newly Released Surveillance Orders Show That Even with Individualized Court Oversight, Spying Powers Are Misused

Once-secret surveillance court orders obtained by EFF last week show that even when the court authorizes the government to spy on specific Americans for national security purposes, that authorization can be misused to potentially violate other people’s civil liberties.

Source: Newly Released Surveillance Orders Show That Even with Individualized Court Oversight, Spying Powers Are Misused | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Google and Facebook are watching our every move online. It’s time to make them stop.

To make any real progress in advancing data privacy this year, we have to start doing something about Google and Facebook. Not doing so would be like trying to lose weight without changing your diet. Simply ineffective.

Source: Google, Facebook data privacy concerns out of control-commentary

Balancing the benefits of location data with privacy protection

Popular lifestyle and utility apps have long raised privacy concerns about their collection and use of personally identifiable information, but the recent Strava “heatmap” issue has reminded us that privacy risks are not confined to PII.

Source: Balancing the benefits of location data with privacy protection

The DRIP(A) of Watson

Despite Security Minister Ben Wallace’s attempts to downplay it, the Court of Appeal’s ruling in the Watson case continues the drip of cases finding the Government’s draconian attempt to access bulk communications data (BCD) unlawful. Concerning the now expired sections 1 and 2 of Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act 2014 (DRIPA), the ruling impacts Part 4 of the Investigatory Powers Act 2016. Although amendments are already tabled, the upcoming judicial review brought by Liberty means the Government should heed the court’s warning. Watson and related cases centre on the state’s power to retain and access bulk communications data and privacy and communications rights. In this knotty area three key lessons can be found.

Source: The DRIP(A) of Watson – SCRIPTed

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