fbpx

Download free GDPR compliance checklist!

Tag Archives for " monitoring "

French Court Bans the Use of Drone Surveillance to Enforce Covid-19 Lockdown

The Conseil d’État, France’s highest administrative court, issued a decision banning French authorities from using drone surveillance to track individuals violating social distancing rules.

The Court cited privacy issues with drone surveillance and stated that drone surveillance by police would be banned until technology is added to prevent the filming and identification of individuals or approval was given by France’s privacy regulator, the Commission nationale de l’informatique et des libertés (CNIL).

Source: French Court Bans the Use of Drone Surveillance to Enforce Covid-19 Lockdown

German Mass Surveillance Abroad is Ruled Unconstitutional

In a landmark decision, the German Constitutional Court has ruled that mass surveillance of telecommunications outside of Germany conducted on foreign nationals is unconstitutional.

In its press release about the decision, the court found that the privacy rights of the German constitution also protects foreigners in other countries and that the German intelligence agency, Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND), had no authority to conduct telecommunications surveillance on them.

The court also decided that as currently structured, there was no way for the BND to restrict the type of data collected and who it was being collected from. Unrestricted mass surveillance posed a particular threat to the rights and safety of lawyers, journalists and their sources and clients.

Source: Victory! German Mass Surveillance Abroad is Ruled Unconstitutional

Has coronavirus opened the door to mass electronic surveillance in the UK?

An app that, once downloaded, lets you escape lockdown may sound tempting, but its implications could be dystopian.

In authoritarian states such as Russia or China, the fear is surely that tracking systems could be abused. In Britain, the worry is more that everyday life could swiftly become difficult for those unwilling to sign up. Even if it’s strictly voluntary, are we so sure that unscrupulous employers wouldn’t demand applicants install the app as a condition of hiring, that rogue landlords won’t try to discriminate against tenants who can’t show they have it, that insurers won’t seek to restrict health cover accordingly?

Full article: Has coronavirus opened the door to mass electronic surveillance in the UK? | Gaby Hinsliff | Opinion | The Guardian

Some shirts hide you from cameras—but will anyone wear them?

It’s theoretically possible to become invisible to cameras. But can it catch on?

The idea of using the “ugly shirt” to render oneself invisible to cameras has been a part of science fiction for a decade or more. But today, there are indeed computer scientists and artists working to make invisibility as simple as a shirt or a scarf… in theory, at least.

Full article: Some shirts hide you from cameras—but will anyone wear them? | Ars Technica

US task force seeks national coronavirus surveillance system

White House senior adviser Jared Kushner’s task force has reached out to a range of health technology companies about creating a national coronavirus surveillance system to give the government a near real-time view of where patients are seeking treatment and for what, and whether hospitals can accommodate them, according to four people with knowledge of the discussions.

The proposed national network could help determine which areas of the country can safely relax social-distancing rules and which should remain vigilant. But it would also represent a significant expansion of government use of individual patient data, forcing a new reckoning over privacy limits amid a national crisis.

Source: Kushner’s team seeks national coronavirus surveillance system – POLITICO

Detroit employs ‘Plane Flyovers, Video Surveillance’ to Enforce Social Distancing

The city of Detroit is increasing its Big Brother-type controls to ensure residents abide by social distancing orders.

City leaders are growing increasingly annoyed with residents who are ignoring commands, as the city comprises 6.7 percent of Michigan’s population but one-quarter of the state’s coronavirus cases.

Source: Detroit: ‘Plane Flyovers, Video Surveillance’ to Enforce Social Distancing

Privately funded surveillance planes to begin patrolling Baltimore skies

Three privately funded surveillance planes were cleared to begin patrolling Baltimore from the sky Wednesday, despite opposition from multiple civil liberties groups who warned that such surveillance could violate protections in the U.S. Constitution.

It allows the planes to collect images of the city to help investigate murders, nonfatal shootings, armed robberies and carjackings.

Source: Privately funded surveillance planes to begin patrolling Baltimore skies – The Washington Post

Armenia amends law to allow tracking of infected

The National Assembly of the Republic of Armenia on 31 March, 2020 passed amendments to the Law on Legal Regime of the State of Emergency and to the Law on Electronic Communication as a response to the current COVID-19 (‘Coronavirus’) pandemic.

Amendments in the Law on Electronic Communication will allow the tracking of individuals infected with the Coronavirus through smart phones and technical means.

Source: National Assembly of the Republic of Armenia | Official Web Site | parliament.am

Australia will install home surveillance hardware to ensure virus isolation

The State of Western Australia has given itself the power to install surveillance devices in homes, or compel people to wear them, to ensure that those required to isolate during the coronavirus crisis don’t interact with the community.

Not all people will be required to use the devices. State Premier Mark McGowan said they’ll only be used if: “Someone who is directed to self-isolate and fails to comply.”

Source: Australian state will install home surveillance hardware to make sure if you’re in virus isolation, you stay there • The Register

Justice Department audit finds widespread flaws in FBI surveillance applications 

A Justice Department audit of the FBI’s use of secret surveillance warrants has found widespread problems with the law enforcement agency’s process for ensuring that facts are backing up the claims made to judges when seeking a warrant.

The finding of broader failings in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act program came in a review launched by Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz after an earlier inquiry found numerous errors in applications to monitor former Trump campaign foreign policy adviser Carter Page. In a bid to assess whether the faults in the Page’s surveillance process were an aberration or a chronic problem, Horowitz’s audit team zeroed in on 29 applications for surveillance of U.S. citizens or green-card holders over a five-year period.

Source: Justice Department audit finds widespread flaws in FBI surveillance applications – POLITICO

1 2 3 22
>