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Tag Archives for " monitoring "

Privacy rights under threat with Irish government’s national ID card

A UN representative has called out the Irish government’s introduction of an ID card which contains biometric information.

UN special rapporteur on extreme poverty Prof Philip Alston criticised the roll-out of the Public Services Card (PSC), saying the government introduced the card “without any transparency of public debate”.

Source: UN official says privacy rights under threat with Irish government’s national ID card | The Canary

Appeal against government mass surveillance loses in High Court

The human rights group Liberty has failed in its legal bid to put an end to the Investigatory Powers Act.

The law permits mass monitoring of connected devices to enable intelligence agencies to extend surveillance and government knowledge. But the legislation, branded the “Snoopers’ Charter” by its detractors has come under heavy criticism.

Source: Appeal against government mass surveillance loses in High Court

Fujifilm’s first surveillance camera can read a license plate from 1km away

Fujifilm is getting into surveillance cameras with the SX800, a long-range surveillance camera with a 40x optical zoom that’s designed to offer security at international borders and large commercial facilities.

Fujifilm says the SX800 will have a total equivalent focal length of 1000mm, which is enough to focus on a car’s license plate from 1km or roughly 0.6 miles away.

For everyone it’s a good reminder that just because you can’t see a security camera, that doesn’t mean one can’t see you, even if it’s multiple kilometers away.

Source: Fujifilm’s first surveillance camera can read a license plate from 1km away – The Verge

Automated facial recognition trials backed by UK home secretary

Home Secretary Sajid Javid has given his backing to the police in their trials of facial recognition cameras.

The surveillance software, which is designed to help spot suspects in public spaces, has been trialled by several forces, including the Met.

Civil liberties campaigners have criticised the technology, which is the subject of a legal challenge.

Source: Automated facial recognition trials backed by home secretary – BBC News

ECHR rules uninterrupted CCTV surveillance of detainees is breach of privacy

The case originated in three applications against the Russian Federation lodged with the European Court of Human Rights (Court). The applicants complained, in particular, that constant surveillance of their cells, at times by female guards, by closed-circuit television cameras had violated their right to respect for their private life, as guaranteed by Article 8 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.

The Court found that the permanent CCTV camera monitoring of the applicants, all in detention, breached their right to private life in contravention of Article 8 of the Convention.

Read ruling

Government watchdog says the FBI has access to about 640 million photographs

A government watchdog says the FBI has access to about 640 million photographs — including from driver’s licenses, passports and mug shots — that can be searched using facial recognition technology.

The fact was reported by the Government Accountability Office at a congressional hearing in which both Democrats and Republicans raised questions about the use of the technology.

The figure reflects how the technology is becoming an increasingly powerful law enforcement tool, but is also stirring fears about the potential for authorities to intrude on the lives of Americans.

Source: Government watchdog says the FBI has access to about 640 million photographs [Video]

Amazon’s helping police build a surveillance network with Ring doorbells

While residential neighborhoods aren’t usually lined with security cameras, the smart doorbell’s popularity has essentially created private surveillance networks powered by Amazon and promoted by police departments.

Police departments across the country, from major cities like Houston to towns with fewer than 30,000 people, have offered free or discounted Ring doorbells to citizens, sometimes using taxpayer funds to pay for Amazon’s products. While Ring owners are supposed to have a choice on providing police footage, in some giveaways, police require recipients to turn over footage when requested.

Source: Amazon’s helping police build a surveillance network with Ring doorbells – CNET

Facial recognition smart glasses could make public surveillance discreet and ubiquitous

A new product from UAE firm NNTC shows where this tech is headed next. The AR glasses have an 8-megapixel camera embedded in the frame which allows the wearer to scan faces in a crowd and compare with a database of 1 million images.

Technology like this means law enforcement agencies can adopt facial recognition algorithms and use them in public spaces with less hassle and fewer distractions. That means it’s likely to be used more widely.

Source: Facial recognition smart glasses could make public surveillance discreet and ubiquitous – The Verge

AI used to identify thieves in Walmart

The American supermarket chain, Walmart has said that it uses AI recognition technology on its checkouts to help root out shoplifters.

The AI cameras are capable of spotting when items have been placed inside a shopping bag without having been scanned either by a cashier or through the self-service scan mechanism.

Source: AI used to identify thieves in Walmart, USA

Irish DPA issues guidance on the Use of CCTV

Irelands data protection authority – Data Protection Commission – has issued a guidance on use of CCTVs and video surveillance.

This guidance is intended to assist owners and occupiers of premises, in particular those that are workplaces or are otherwise accessible to the public, to understand their responsibilities and obligations regarding data protection when using CCTV.

Access guidance: Guidance on the Use of CCTV – For Data Controllers • DPO.guide

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