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Tag Archives for " monitoring "

Activists Sue San Francisco for Wide-Ranging Surveillance of Black-Led Protests Against Police Violence

Violating San Francisco’s Surveillance Technology Ordinance, SFPD Secretly Used Camera Network to Spy on People Protesting Police Killing of George Floyd.

Local activists sued San Francisco today over the city police department’s illegal use of a network of more than 400 non-city surveillance cameras to spy on them and thousands of others who protested as part of the Black-led movement against police violence.

Source: Activists Sue San Francisco for Wide-Ranging Surveillance of Black-Led Protests Against Police Violence

Europe’s top court confirms no mass surveillance without limits

Europe’s top court has delivered another slap-down to indiscriminate government mass surveillance regimes.

In a ruling the CJEU has made it clear that national security concerns do not exclude EU Member States from the need to comply with general principles of EU law such as proportionality and respect for fundamental rights to privacy, data protection and freedom of expression.

However the court has also allowed for derogations, saying that a pressing national security threat can justify limited and temporary bulk data collection and retention — capped to ‘what is strictly necessary’.

Source: Europe’s top court confirms no mass surveillance without limits | TechCrunch

Students Are Rebelling Against Eye-Tracking Exam Surveillance Tools

Invasive test-taking software has become mandatory in many places, and some companies are retaliating against those who speak out.

he software turns students’ computers into powerful invigilators—webcams monitor eye and head movements, microphones record noise in the room, and algorithms log how often a test taker moves their mouse, scrolls up and down on a page, and pushes keys. The software flags any behavior its algorithm deems suspicious for later viewing by the class instructor.

Students’ and educators’ objections to exam proctoring software go beyond the privacy concerns around being watched and listened to in their bedrooms while they take a test. As more evidence emerges about how the programs work, and fail to work, critics say the tools are bound to hurt low-income students, students with disabilities, students with children or other dependents, and other groups who already face barriers in higher education.

Source: Students Are Rebelling Against Eye-Tracking Exam Surveillance Tools

Apple delays new anti-tracking privacy feature for phones and tablets

Apple has delayed the introduction of a stricter privacy feature designed to stop apps and websites tracking people online without their consent. The company had previously announced a change that would mean app developers have to ask users for permission to track them for advertising purposes.

The company had previously announced a change that would mean app developers have to ask users for permission to track them for advertising purposes. The measures were due to be implemented in the iOS 14 update to its operating system in the autumn.

Source: Apple delays new anti-tracking privacy feature for phones and tablets

Doorbell Cameras Help to Spy on Police

Two leaked documents show how a monitoring tool used by police has been turned against them.

The rise of the internet-connected home security camera has generally been a boon to police, as owners of these devices can (and frequently do) share footage with cops at the touch of a button. But according to a leaked FBI bulletin, law enforcement has discovered an ironic downside to ubiquitous privatized surveillance: The cameras are alerting residents when police show up to conduct searches.

Source: Doorbell Cameras Like Ring Give Early Warning of Police Searches, FBI Warned

Surveillance Scandal Involving U.S. Intelligence Hits Denmark

Denmark has been rocked by a surveillance scandal in which private citizens’ data was allegedly collected by military intelligence and then shared with foreign powers.

The revelations, brought forward by a whistle-blower, have already resulted in several high-level dismissals at the agency.

Source: Surveillance Scandal Involving U.S. Intelligence Hits Denmark

Barclays faces ICO probe for ‘spying on staff’

The watchdog is investigating allegations the firm used computer monitoring software to track employees.

The British bank has been known in the past to use employee-tracking software such as Sapience and OccupEye. Sapience is used for tracking employees’ productivity by monitoring their computer usage, while OccupEye tracks the time that is spent by employees at their desks.

Source: Barclays faces ICO probe for ‘spying on staff’ | IT PRO

San Francisco Police Accessed Business District Camera Network to Spy on Protestors

The San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) conducted mass surveillance of protesters at the end of May and in early June using a downtown business district’s camera network, according to new records obtained by EFF.

The records show that SFPD received real-time live access to hundreds of cameras as well as a “data dump” of camera footage amid the ongoing demonstrations against police violence.

Source: San Francisco Police Accessed Business District Camera Network to Spy on Protestors

The FBI Is Secretly Using A $2 Billion Travel Company As A Global Surveillance Tool

An unprecedented order on a huge travel company reveals how the FBI tracks suspects around the world.

As the biggest of three companies that store the vast majority of the world’s travel information—from airline seats to hotel bookings — Sabre has been called on to hand over that travellers’ data and, on at least one occasion, do “real-time” tracking of a suspect. And, say former employees, the same powerful trove of information could be used to help monitor the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Source: The FBI Is Secretly Using A $2 Billion Travel Company As A Global Surveillance Tool

Coronavirus opens door to company surveillance of workers

Privacy advocates warn of a slippery slope toward “normalizing” new levels of employer surveillance.

Employers are rushing to use digital tracking technology to reduce virus transmission in the workplace. But privacy experts worry that businesses will start using their newfound surveillance capabilities for purposes far beyond public health. The data could be used to evaluate workers’ productivity, see which colleagues are holding meetings or even flag an employee who unexpectedly ducks out of the office during work hours.

Full article: Coronavirus opens door to company surveillance of workers – POLITICO

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