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Tag Archives for " opinion "

Even ticking a box does not necessarily mean consent is freely given

Digiday spoke to Giovanni Buttarelli, European data protection supervisor, to hear whether media and advertising businesses have done enough to comply. He believes Google and Facebook must work harder to achieve compliance.

Full article: Giovanni Buttarelli on state of GDPR adoption: ‘Even ticking a box does not necessarily mean consent is freely given’ – Digiday

‘Privacy Is Becoming a Luxury’: What Data Leaks Are Like for the Poor

The last few years have featured some of the largest and most potentially damaging data leaks in history, like the Equifax credit breach. But low-income Americans often find themselves trading personal information for access to benefits ranging from food to housing to childcare.

“For low-income people, the stakes [of a data breach] are higher,” said Michele E. Gilman, director of the Saul Ewing Civil Advocacy Clinic at the University of Baltimore, and a former Department of Justice civil rights attorney. She cited examples of former clients whose utilities were shut off after someone opened a false account in their name and failed to pay, or who were picked up on warrants for crimes committed by someone else under their name. For people without money to quickly reinstate a utility service or hire a criminal attorney, those types of errors—even if eventually rectified—can have long-lasting consequences, including job loss or child protective involvement.

Full article: ‘Privacy Is Becoming a Luxury’: What Data Leaks Are Like for the Poor – VICE

Can Facebook Ever Be Fixed?

From many scandals in 2018 to an actual spyware app the company paid users to download to downright disastrous security practices exposed earlier this year, the Facebook can’t seem to get much right.

In the recent post Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg proposes four new ideas to regulate the internet. However, the hard truth is that Facebook’s own interests diverge — in some cases, wildly — from those of its users. So its trust problem won’t change until its business model does.

Full article: Can Facebook Ever Be Fixed?

How to achieve digital governance?

Digital governance is corporate oversight of technologies that use personal or sensitive information, make autonomous decisions or exercise human-like responsibilities. The concept addresses disruptive technologies including artificial intelligence (AI), connected devices (IoT, cars, ubiquitous sensors, etc), and machine learning.

To establish digital governance programmes, companies must:

  1. first structure themselves accordingly,
  2. have a full picture of what they are doing,
  3. create an organisational culture that values fair digital practices.

Full article: Data Protection & Cybersecurity 2019 | Global Practice Guides | Chambers and Partners

How to address new privacy issues raised by artificial intelligence and machine learning

Artificial intelligence and machine learning present unique challenges for protecting the privacy of personal data.

For this reason, policymakers need to craft new national privacy legislation that accounts for the numerous limitations that scholars have identified in the notice and consent model of privacy that has guided privacy thinking for decades. The exacerbation of privacy externalities created by machine learning techniques is just one more reason regarding the need for new privacy rules.

Full article: How to address new privacy issues raised by artificial intelligence and machine learning

Data Is the New Opex

As the industry transforms itself, instead of being a line item on the capital expense (capex) side of the house, data tech will continue to become more and more integrated into the back office and ultimately become a business-mandatory operating expense (opex). We already see this with the increasing number of businesses migrating data to the cloud.

Full article: Data Is the New Opex – DATAVERSITY

De-Identification Should Be Relevant to a Privacy Law, But Not an Automatic Get-Out-of-Jail-Free Card

The most important definition in any privacy law is the scope of information that is covered by that law. A line must be drawn somewhere between personal and non-personal data, the argument goes , or else laws will capture all information even if it presents no risks to an individual’s privacy.

Full article: De-Identification Should Be Relevant to a Privacy Law, But Not an Automatic Get-Out-of-Jail-Free Card

Surrendering privacy for survival

Americans at the lower end of the economic ladder suffer from an ever-growing privacy divide, impacting more than just their personal dignity and autonomy.

Low-income communities have historically been been monitored by government and their privacy has been routinely invaded. In Colonial America, most towns had an “overseer of the poor” who tracked poor people and either chased them out of town or auctioned off their labor. Current public benefits programs ask applicants extremely detailed and personal questions and sometimes mandate home visits, drug tests, fingerprinting, and collection of biometric information.

Full article: Another tax on the poor: Surrendering privacy for survival

Forget about defining a DPO; define the data protection committee instead

Data protection professionals and organization management officers share a common question: Who should the data protection officer be? Some argue that a legal professional is most suitable for this role; some argue that an operations professional is the natural pick.

Full article: Forget about defining a DPO; define the data protection committee instead

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