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As the GDPR turns 2, Big Tech should watch out for big sanctions

Get ready to see the EU’s landmark privacy regulation flex its muscles as it prepares for a fight.

The GDPR’s quiet first two years give a false impression of the impact the law has had on the global stage. The legislation has raised the EU’s profile among regulators and lawmakers around the world and inspired similar regulations in Brazil and India, as well as in California, home to many of the tech giants. Tech companies have had to change their privacy policies and disclosures not only in Europe but around the world, since it doesn’t make sense to observe two sets of privacy standards.

And industry watchers say more moves are coming. The regulators are just taking the time to make sure these sanctions stick.

Source: As the GDPR turns 2, Big Tech should watch out for big sanctions – CNET

No need to mourn the death of the third-party cookie

Amid the whirlwinds of the industry’s response, it’s become abundantly clear that the demise of the cookie is probably a good thing for everyone involved – audience members, publishers and even marketers.

The cookie’s demise has been written on the wall for some time. Many trends have been gradually diminishing the efficacy of the cookie. And, people generally dislike the feeling of someone tracking their every online move. Why not replace that tension with a better model? It’s time to turn to newer, better tools.

Full article: No need to mourn the death of the third-party cookie

You can have privacy and fight Covid-19

You don’t have to give up privacy in fight against Covid, says Leonardo Cervera Navas, Director European Data Protection Supervisor, EDPS.

“We do not have to give up privacy entirely. It is perfectly possible to stop the contagion while at that same time have anonymity in place. It does not have to be one of the other,” or so said Leonardo Cervera Navas, Director at the EDPS.

Full article: You can have privacy and fight Covid, says Leonardo Cervera Navas of EDPS

Aggregated data provides a false sense of security

Accessing personal data comes at a risk to privacy, and there are many unfortunate examples of harm coming to individuals diagnosed with COVID-19.

One common refrain we’re hearing is to “aggregate” data to make it safe for sharing or release. Although aggregation may seem like a simple approach to creating safe outputs from data, it is fraught with hazards and pitfalls. Like so many things in our profession, the answer to the question of whether aggregation is safe is “it depends.”

Full article: Aggregated data provides a false sense of security

Coronavirus didn’t kill our privacy — it just exposed the corpse

In most countries only minor amendments of the laws sufficed to introduce Covid-19 surveillance, which normally would be an eye opener. It is the new normal, where privacy is no longer an issue or not even a “nuisance” for the power hungry.

The pandemic is an opportunity to mobilize the grassroots privacy effort and adapt to emergencies. If we don’t, tyrannies will act for the ‘greater good.’

Full article: Coronavirus didn’t kill our privacy — it just exposed the corpse

5G to raise privacy challenges and opportunities

No doubt the 5G technology will allow for dramatic new technological innovation, but at the same time, it poses some privacy issues.

Privacy professionals may feel 5G represents a whole new frontier full of challenges. With highly accurate data coming in at faster speeds, privacy professionals will have to focus on ensuring organizations are transparent with how data is used and how to handle gathering consent for data processing activities happening in real time.

Full article: 5G to raise privacy challenges and opportunities

California Consumer Privacy Act: Will it prompt federal data privacy & protection laws in the U.S.? 

Passed unanimously, and introduced on 1 January this year, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) is the first comprehensive legislation that focuses on consumer data and privacy in the US. Similar to the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the CCPA has forced most businesses operating in the state to make structural changes to their privacy programs.

The CCPA has already triggered a number of other data security and privacy regulations at state level, but how long will it take before we see federal data privacy and protection laws implemented in the US?

Full article: California Consumer Privacy Act: Will it prompt federal data privacy & protection laws in the U.S.? – PrivSec Report

Time to re-evaluate AI algorithms right from the design stage

The inherent bias that all-too-often springs from AI algorithms is well-documented.

With AI bias and errant outcomes surging, a call for more human involvement. ‘Even the people deploying these algorithms sometimes would be surprised that these things could happen’.

The best approaches to eradicating such bias is general awareness, as well as designating trained people to examine and audit AI output.

Full article: Time to re-evaluate AI algorithms right from the design stage, experts urge | ZDNet

GDPR ushers in civil litigation claims across the EU

The EU General Data Protection Regulation ushered in an enhanced private right of action for violations of the law, both for material or non-material damage.

Plaintiffs can sue for compensation based on the damage suffered. Attorneys say there’s now a significant uptick in cases brought alleging such a grievance has occurred, often as a “follow-on” to data protection authorities’ investigations. And depending on any given judge’s sympathy for plaintiffs alleging data misuse, as well as how sizable the class is, the cost to organizations could be significant.

Full article: GDPR ushers in civil litigation claims across the EU

Advocate General delivers opinion on GDPR consent

On March 4, 2020, Advocate General Szpunar (“AG”) delivered his opinion in the case C-61/19 Orange România SA v Autoritatea Naţională de Supraveghere a Prelucrării Datelor cu Caracter Personal (ANSPDCP).

The AG concluded that a printed telecommunication contract stating that customers consent to the processing of a copy of their identification card does not meet the strict requirements for consent of the GDPR, even if the customers are orally informed that they can refuse their consent by writing this by hand on the contract.

Source: Advocate General delivers opinion on GDPR consent

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