Tag Archives for " opinion "

When Obscurity Is Not a Defense

Many organizations facing a data-security incident struggle to understand how or why their organization was targeted in an attack. Most simply believe they are too small or too obscure to be targeted by malicious cyber actors.

Even larger, well-known businesses are lulled into complacency, mistaking years without a major security incident as evidence that their business is an unlikely target, or believing that a small corner of their business, perhaps the new cloud instance they’re testing, will go unnoticed.

Source: When Obscurity Is Not a Defense

Deep Fakes: A Looming Crisis for National Security, Democracy and Privacy?

Manipulating images, sound, or video to convincingly mislead the public could take so-called “fake news” to a new level.

Recent events amply demonstrate that false claims—even preposterous ones—can be peddled with unprecedented success today thanks to a combination of social media ubiquity and virality, cognitive biases, filter bubbles, and group polarization. The resulting harms are significant for individuals, businesses, and democracy. Belated recognition of the problem has spurred a variety of efforts to address this most recent illustration of truth decay, and at first blush there seems to be reason for optimism. Alas, the problem may soon take a significant turn for the worse thanks to deep fakes.

Source: Deep Fakes: A Looming Crisis for National Security, Democracy and Privacy? – Lawfare

Are the Standard Contractual Clauses Enough?

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) is arguably the most comprehensive – and complex – data privacy regulation in the world. As companies prepare for the GDPR to go into force on May 25, 2018, there continues to be a great deal of confusion regarding the requirements of the GDPR.

To help address that confusion, Bryan Cave is publishing a multi-part series that discusses the questions most frequently asked by clients concerning the GDPR.

Source: Bryan Cave – GDPR: The Most Frequently Asked Questions: Are the Standard Contractual Clauses Enough?

Article 29 Working Party Comments on FATCA

Article 29 Working responded to a letter on effect of U.S. Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) on European citizens who, due to U.S.
citizenship law, are either “accidental Americans” or dual European/US nationals.

At the moment all EU Member States have now signed individual intergovernmental agreements (IGAs) with the US. These IGAs provide the legal basis for the processing of the personal data of American nationals in the context of FATCA. In addition, EU data protection authorities have been monitoring the measures taken by European governments
to implement FATCA at national level.

Source: ARTICLE29 Newsroom – Letter of the Chair of the ART 29 WP to FATCA – European Commission

GDPR + e-Privacy = :-(

At some point in your life, you’ve probably had the experience of meeting someone who you feel you ought to like but, no matter how hard you try, you just can’t seem to gel with them – awkward silences creep into conversations and you find that, while you may share similar values, the ways you each go about approaching things are just different.

Source: GDPR + e-Privacy = 🙁

The Argument Against a Mobile Device Backdoor for Government

The ‘responsible encryption’ demanded by law enforcement and some politicians will not prevent criminals ‘going dark’; will weaken cyber security for innocent Americans; and will have a hit on the U.S. economy. At the same time, there are existing legal methods for law enforcement to gain access to devices without requiring new legislation.

These are the conclusions of Riana Pfefferkorn, cryptography fellow at the Center for Internet and Society at the Stanford Law School in a paper published Tuesday titled, The Risks of “Responsible Encryption”.

Source: The Argument Against a Mobile Device Backdoor for Government | SecurityWeek.Com

Is it time to crack down on facial recognition?

At least half of American adults have their photo in a facial recognition network that authorities can search without a court order or meaningful privacy protections.

But that finding by Georgetown University researchers, who dubbed the networks a “perpetual line-up” in late 2016, generated little legislative activity.

Source: Is it time to crack down on facial recognition?

The Tories claim the data protection bill will make us safer. That’s not true.

The government’s growing store of personal details allows automatic adjudication on crucial aspects of our lives, writes Diane Abbott, the shadow home secretary.

Source: The Tories claim the data protection bill will make us safer. That’s not true | Diane Abbott | Opinion | The Guardian

The General Data Protection Regulation Could Be A Big Opportunity

Ever since the European Union announced the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) — a sweeping new set of data privacy rules that will affect global firms that do business on European soil — much of the discussion has focused on its negative effects.

Source: ADPVoice: The General Data Protection Regulation Could Be A Big Opportunity. Here’s Why.

UN Privacy Rapporteur releases Draft Legal Instrument on Government-led Surveillance and Privacy

On 10 January 2018 the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy, Joseph Cannataci, released the Draft Legal Instrument on Government-led Surveillance and Privacy. It aims at giving clear and detailed guidance for the area of government-led or organized surveillance using electronic means.

Read the Draft Legal Instrument here.

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