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Tag Archives for " opinion "

Facial recognition’s fate could be decided in 2021

At stake is the role facial recognition will play as society weighs the importance of security over civil liberties. Though millions of consumers use the technology every day through the Face ID feature on their iPhones, opponents worry that the public use of facial recognition is an invasion of your personal privacy.

Others warn that the algorithms are flawed, often showing bias against women and minorities. 2020 saw its share of headlines on the topic.

A number of lawsuits and legislative measures mean the debate over the use of facial recognition is poised to ramp up.

Full article: Facial recognition’s fate could be decided in 2021 – CNET

EU-US data transfer clarity may take several months, warns head of EDPS

European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) Wojciech Wiewiorowski says he does not expect a new solution to the Privacy Shield problem for several months, as the Biden administration grapples with other priority issues.

The head of the EDPS told Reuters said he is doubtful that EU businesses will receive clarity in the coming weeks and months over the uncertainty around EU-US data transfers.

Source: EU-US data transfer clarity may take several months, warns head of EDPB

If It’s Fiction, Can It Be an Invasion of Privacy?

When nonfiction writers face backlash for their depictions of loved ones, the disputes tend to center on how far their indiscretions have stretched. But what happens when someone no longer wants to appear in an ex-partner’s work, period?

Emmanuel Carrère’s latest novel, “Yoga,” has stoked debate in France after the author’s ex-wife, Hélène Devynck, accused him of writing about her without her consent.

Full article: If It’s Fiction, Can It Be an Invasion of Privacy? – The New York Times

GDPR enforcement must level up to catch big tech, report warns

A new report by European consumer protection umbrella group Beuc, reflecting on the barriers to effective cross-border enforcement of the EU’s flagship data protection framework, makes awkward reading for the regional lawmakers and regulators as they seek to shape the next decades of digital oversight across the bloc.

Beuc’s report — which it’s called “The long and winding road: Two years of the GDPR: A cross-border data protection case from a consumer perspective” — details the procedural obstacles its member organizations have faced in seeking to obtain a decision related to the original complaints, which were filed with a variety of DPAs around the EU.

Source: GDPR enforcement must level up to catch big tech, report warns | TechCrunch

The Biden administration should push for a federal data protection law

In the United States, companies are largely not required by law to protect your personal data. There are some exceptions—certain specific types of data are regulated (health information, for instance, or data about children under 13), and the California Consumer Privacy Act, which went into effect this year, imposes some security and privacy requirements on companies collecting information about California residents.

But those piecemeal solutions do not come close to adequately addressing the huge gap at the heart of U.S. civilian cybersecurity policy: the absence of a federal data protection law. However, this could be a rare opportunity for bipartisan cooperation in Congress.

Full article: The Biden administration should push for a federal data protection law.

How regulators can get facial recognition technology right

As facial recognition technology (FRT) spreads, regulators have tools to ensure that this technology does not result in inaccurate or biased outcomes.

Policymakers can ensure that responsible protocols are in place to validate that facial recognition technology works as billed and to inform decisions about whether and how to use FRT. In building a framework for responsible testing and development, policymakers should empower regulators to use stronger auditing authority and the procurement process to prevent facial recognition applications from evolving in ways that would be harmful to the broader public.

Full article: How regulators can get facial recognition technology right

Defining data protection standards could be a hot topic in state legislation in 2021

Some states could follow the New York Shield Act’s lead and set clearer regulatory expectations for reasonable cybersecurity. Election security legislation likely not on the agenda.

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, at least 38 states, along with Washington, DC, and Puerto Rico introduced or considered more than 280 bills or resolutions that deal significantly with cybersecurity as of September 2020. Setting aside privacy and some grid security funding issues, there are two categories of cybersecurity legislative issues at the state level to watch during 2021. The first and most important is spelling out more clearly what organizations need to meet security and privacy regulations. The second is whether states will pick up election security legislation left over from the 2020 sessions.

Source: Defining data protection standards could be a hot topic in state legislation in 2021 | CSO Online

3 Things Businesses Need To Know About the Shifting Privacy Landscape of 2020

The main issues surrounding data management and consumer privacy will only accelerate as we move forward into the final months of the year. Here are three major trends and events to look out for.

1. A new California privacy law is on the way, and the federal government is up for grabs.

2. The EU continues to change how companies will transfer data internationally

3. Big tech players are responding to new consumer expectations

Full article: 3 Things Businesses Need To Know About the Shifting Privacy Landscape of 2020 – CPO Magazine

‘Accept cookies’ banners are undermining privacy

Amid the flurry of new privacy laws over the past few years like the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), companies resorted to accept cookies banners as a means of compliance. But are they actually working?

A recent study shows they may actually undermine EU privacy laws. The EU even released new guidelines this spring saying that companies cannot require users to accept cookies to access their website—because consent is only valid if it’s freely given, not in the form of a cookie wall that demands it.

Full article: Data privacy: ‘Accept cookies’ banners are undermining it | Fortune

Global AI fight heats up over health data

Spat over a Microsoft health data project highlights growing European distrust of U.S. tech.

The French government made that clear last week, when it said it wanted to move control of an effort to centralize the country’s health data project away from the American tech giant Microsoft and into the hands of a French or European platform.

The attention to health data underscores the increasing politicization of questions about who owns private information about European consumers, after the European Court of Justice struck down a framework for sharing data between the European Union and the United States known as the Privacy Shield.

It also comes as governments around the world race to develop new artificial intelligence technology — and grapple with how to regulate it. The EU is set to present rules on AI early next year, and must confront a risk inherent to rule-making: making regulation that quickly becomes obsolete.

Full article: Global AI fight heats up over health data – POLITICO

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