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Tag Archives for " opinion "

How regulators can get facial recognition technology right

As facial recognition technology (FRT) spreads, regulators have tools to ensure that this technology does not result in inaccurate or biased outcomes.

Policymakers can ensure that responsible protocols are in place to validate that facial recognition technology works as billed and to inform decisions about whether and how to use FRT. In building a framework for responsible testing and development, policymakers should empower regulators to use stronger auditing authority and the procurement process to prevent facial recognition applications from evolving in ways that would be harmful to the broader public.

Full article: How regulators can get facial recognition technology right

Defining data protection standards could be a hot topic in state legislation in 2021

Some states could follow the New York Shield Act’s lead and set clearer regulatory expectations for reasonable cybersecurity. Election security legislation likely not on the agenda.

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, at least 38 states, along with Washington, DC, and Puerto Rico introduced or considered more than 280 bills or resolutions that deal significantly with cybersecurity as of September 2020. Setting aside privacy and some grid security funding issues, there are two categories of cybersecurity legislative issues at the state level to watch during 2021. The first and most important is spelling out more clearly what organizations need to meet security and privacy regulations. The second is whether states will pick up election security legislation left over from the 2020 sessions.

Source: Defining data protection standards could be a hot topic in state legislation in 2021 | CSO Online

3 Things Businesses Need To Know About the Shifting Privacy Landscape of 2020

The main issues surrounding data management and consumer privacy will only accelerate as we move forward into the final months of the year. Here are three major trends and events to look out for.

1. A new California privacy law is on the way, and the federal government is up for grabs.

2. The EU continues to change how companies will transfer data internationally

3. Big tech players are responding to new consumer expectations

Full article: 3 Things Businesses Need To Know About the Shifting Privacy Landscape of 2020 – CPO Magazine

‘Accept cookies’ banners are undermining privacy

Amid the flurry of new privacy laws over the past few years like the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), companies resorted to accept cookies banners as a means of compliance. But are they actually working?

A recent study shows they may actually undermine EU privacy laws. The EU even released new guidelines this spring saying that companies cannot require users to accept cookies to access their website—because consent is only valid if it’s freely given, not in the form of a cookie wall that demands it.

Full article: Data privacy: ‘Accept cookies’ banners are undermining it | Fortune

Global AI fight heats up over health data

Spat over a Microsoft health data project highlights growing European distrust of U.S. tech.

The French government made that clear last week, when it said it wanted to move control of an effort to centralize the country’s health data project away from the American tech giant Microsoft and into the hands of a French or European platform.

The attention to health data underscores the increasing politicization of questions about who owns private information about European consumers, after the European Court of Justice struck down a framework for sharing data between the European Union and the United States known as the Privacy Shield.

It also comes as governments around the world race to develop new artificial intelligence technology — and grapple with how to regulate it. The EU is set to present rules on AI early next year, and must confront a risk inherent to rule-making: making regulation that quickly becomes obsolete.

Full article: Global AI fight heats up over health data – POLITICO

The next generation of wearables will be a privacy minefield

Amazon and Facebook are poised to gain newfound insights into our emotions. The privacy implications would be enormous.

Facebook will be piloting a new set of glasses that will lay the groundwork for an eventual consumer-ready product. Though the project is in its infancy, company is clearly enthusiastic about its potential.

But if you’re among those who believe Facebook already knows too much about our lives, you’re probably more than slightly disturbed by the idea of Facebook having a semi-permanent presence on your actual face.

Full article: The next generation of wearables will be a privacy minefield | Engadget

Dominic Cummings’ data law shake-up a danger to trade

A radical “pro-tech” plan championed by Dominic Cummings to rewrite Britain’s data protection laws is endangering future cooperation with the EU worth billions to the British economy, Brussels has warned.

The government’s newly published national data strategy, promising a “transformation” long sought by Boris Johnson’s chief adviser and the former Vote Leave director, has sparked concern at a sensitive time with the continued flow of data between the UK and EU member states in question.

Source: Dominic Cummings’ data law shake-up a danger to trade, says EU | Politics | The Guardian

Privacy, effectiveness among concerns of robocall-blocking apps

If you’re one of many Canadians who’ve considered alternative measures to block robocalls to your smartphone, a consumer agency says you should be aware of the dangers.

Whether or not the apps are effective is another matter, as most services won’t be able to completely block out the calls. Other features that some apps offer, such as answering calls with nonsensical messages, may actually result in a number getting more scam calls than before.

There is also the concern that a blocking app may expose your personal information, especially when it comes to those that require access to your voicemail.

Source: Better Business Bureau says there are better ways to block auto-dialers than using an app | CTV News

Atlassian says encryption-busting law has damaged Australia’s tech reputation

Startup darling has taken further aim at the TOLA Act, echoing calls for the warrant process to have independent oversight.

Atlassian believes Australia’s encryption-busting legislation continues to have a negative impact on the country’s technology sector, both from the perspective of partnering with an Australian company and attracting tech talent down under.

Source: Atlassian says encryption-busting law has damaged Australia’s tech reputation | ZDNet

As the GDPR turns 2, Big Tech should watch out for big sanctions

Get ready to see the EU’s landmark privacy regulation flex its muscles as it prepares for a fight.

The GDPR’s quiet first two years give a false impression of the impact the law has had on the global stage. The legislation has raised the EU’s profile among regulators and lawmakers around the world and inspired similar regulations in Brazil and India, as well as in California, home to many of the tech giants. Tech companies have had to change their privacy policies and disclosures not only in Europe but around the world, since it doesn’t make sense to observe two sets of privacy standards.

And industry watchers say more moves are coming. The regulators are just taking the time to make sure these sanctions stick.

Source: As the GDPR turns 2, Big Tech should watch out for big sanctions – CNET

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